Poster Space Poster Presentations
Dec 06, 2022 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM(Africa/Casablanca)
20221206T1530 20221206T1615 Africa/Casablanca Poster Presentations - Overcoming Barriers to Change: Stigma, Hesitancy, Misconceptions & Norms Poster Space International Social and Behavior Change Communication Summit info@sbccsummit.org
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Building Core Competencies of the Social Service Workforce Project in Europe and Central Asia: Implementing a sustainable, community of practice, capacity building model engaging academia, government, and practice sectors
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Presenters
MV
Mario Vasquez
UNICEF’s Europe And Central Asia Regional Office (ECARO)
Co-authors
TH
Timothy Hunt
Columbia University School Of Social Work
LK
Lyudmila Kim
SP
Sholpan Primbetova
Columbia University Global Health Research Center Of Central Asia
AH
Ari Holman
Columbia University Social Intervention Group
COVID -19 Health and Social Stigma in Sudan
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Stigma, a mark of disgrace and disapproval from society, can generate shame and social isolation. Historically, patients with infectious diseases have experienced stigma and discrimination. Further, fear of social stigma, discrimination, and shame can lead sick patients to delay or not seek care for their condition. This research-practice collaboration qualitatively explored experiences with COVID-19-related stigma through interviews and focus group discussions across six conflict or post-conflict regions in Sudan. Data from 69 transcripts were analyzed to understand the lived experiences of recovered Sudanese COVID-19 patients and their surrounding network (i.e., family, community members, healthcare workers).
Though often not referred to directly by name, stigma was noted across all participant groups. It manifested in three primary ways: instances of witnessing stigma, experiencing stigma, and of perpetrating stigma. Experiencing stigma can lead to (and was often noted to result in) feelings of sadness, fear, and isolation. Healthcare workers and community members were most likely to report perpetrating stigmatizing behaviors, leading to self-reports of isolating or avoiding stigmatized others. Lastly, witnessing stigma led some to suggest that witnessing stigmatizing behaviors led community members to hide their diagnoses to avoid negative social consequences.
 
Research further supported that support mechanisms are critical to individuals and families affected by COVID-19. Decision makers are encouraged to increase access to psychosocial support services in order to reach those impacted by COVID-19 where possible. This can include using behavioural and community engagement interventions to directly address COVID-19 related concerns.
Presenters
EA
Elhafiz Hussein Abdalla
UNICEF Sudan
CC
Chelsi Campbell
Duke University And North Carolina State University
Co-authors
LG
Lyndsay Gavin
Center For Advanced Hindsight
EA
Eman Eltigani Ali
UNICEF Polio
SE
Samah Elsir
UNICEF
JB
Julianne Birungi
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
LF
Lori Foster
Using information sharing to improve students’ education: A global evidence review
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Many children struggle to master basic skills despite a rise in school enrollment around the world. For instance, India's 2018 Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) found that only about half of all grade 5 students in rural India could read a grade 2 text. Assessments showed similar results in many other countries. The Covid-19 pandemic, which took 1.6 billion children out of school, further exacerbated this  loss. Programs providing information - about parents' roles in education, school quality, students' academic levels, financial aid, and wage returns to education -  address this lack of learning by making relevant information more available.


Results from 23 randomized evaluations from low-, middle-, and high-income countries show that overcoming a gap in knowledge about education often increases parental engagement, student effort, or both, leading to improved learning . Almost all of the programs led to an increase in parental involvement or student motivation, which led to small to medium increases in learning. However, disseminating information has not improved learning levels when key health, financial, or structural barriers persist that information alone cannot overcome, or when the information is discouraging, rather than encouraging, to students.


Because information-based interventions are typically very low cost and have been effective in many contexts, policymakers interested in increasing learning outcomes should consider if there are gaps in parent or student knowledge that they can overcome. This presentation will discuss some of the ways that information-based interventions have been successful, as well as implementation lessons.




Presenters
SW
Samuel Wolf
J-PAL
DW
Demitria Wack
J-PAL
Co-authors
MA
Margaret Andersen
J-PAL Global
From Narratives to Actions: How Social Listening Encourages Proactive and Reactive Pandemic Response in the Philippines
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Two years after the pandemic hit in 2020, social and behavior change communicators continue to take the cudgels, battling the COVID-19 global infodemic from local and community frontlines. COVID-19 response teams around the world have used social listening to navigate through the public health emergency's complex information ecosystem. In the Philippines, the Department of Health (DOH) is working together with USAID Breakthrough ACTION (BA) to sustain info-awareness initiatives and convey COVID-19 health solutions to various publics. 
Social listening helped DOH in feedback gathering, measuring its program effectiveness based on public perception and sentiments. Monitoring news and social media provided a holistic understanding of the shifting narratives surrounding public policy and scientific progress in relation to the government's COVID-19 response, enabling communications strategies and messaging to adjust accordingly. Moving from weekly to bi-weekly reporting, challenges on the time gap from data gathering to reporting resulted in limitations in responding to urgent issues. Nonetheless, results still provided insights useful in organizational decision-making. Through a periodic sweep, social listening enables DOH to "go back in time", analyze, and improve its public responses. Moreover, the opportunity is there to explore social listening as a monitoring and evaluation tool to support impact research, lessons learned activities, and after action reviews. 
Presenters
MA
Maria Kristina Alvarez
Paolo Balderia
Evident Strategic Research And Consulting Inc.
MC
Maryrose Rochelle Caliwan
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
AA
Aaron Joseph Aspi
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Impact of Interpersonal Communication Campaign on Knowledge, Attitude, Intention, and Consumption of Iron Folate Acid Tablets and Iron Rich Foods among Indonesian Women
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Presenters
KD
Kirk Dearden
Corus International
Co-authors
JW
Joshua West
Brigham Young University
CH
Cougar Hall
Brigham Young University
BC
Benjamin Crookston
Brigham Young University
ML
Mary Linehan
IMA World Health
ST
Scott Torres
IMA World Health
Can phone calls help improve knowledge and behaviours for COVID-19 positive patients under home isolation? An interim analysis of the COVID-19 Care Companion Program in Punjab, India.
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
The intended impact of the program is proper management of COVID-19 symptoms with pre-existing medical conditions like Diabetes,Hypertension etc, prevention of virus spread from patient to others at home and in the community, ability to recognise danger signals early to seek care and Improved outcomes for positive patients.The main idea behind this study was to test the scope of an effective family health education intervention being remote, safe, cost effective and readily scalable, in order to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs for COVID-19.Results from this study indicate that this remote, teletraining counseling program can reduce likelihood of hospitalisations.Amongst those who were trained, there was a 48% less likelihood of hospitalisations compared to those who remained untrained.Further evaluations are needed to understand the pathways and replicability of these findings.
Presenters
AC
Adithi Chandrasekar
Noora Health
SY
Shirley Yan
Noora Health
Informed choice challenges for introduction and scale-up of new contraceptive methods and service delivery innovations
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Communication de Risque et Engagement Communautaire pour la lutte contre la COVID19 au MAROC : Une collaboration fructueuse entre le Ministère de la Santé et de la Protection Sociale et l’UNICEF
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
La stratégie nationale de riposte à la COVID19 au Maroc s'est démarquée au niveau mondial, Le bureau de l'UNICEF au Maroc s'est mobilisé pour appuyer le Ministère de la Santé et de la Protection Sociale (MSPS) et ce à plusieurs niveaux ; en termes de Communication de Risque et Engagement Communautaire (RCCE), plusieurs axes d'intervention ont été identifiés et initiés avec plusieurs départements institutionnels et la société civile :
Communication de masse à travers les différents canaux médiatiques et réseaux sociaux en coordination avec les partenaires clés et notamment le MSPS ;Communication interpersonnelle et engagement Communautaire ;L'Engagement des jeunes et adolescent.e.s. à travers la mise en œuvre d'initiatives avec et par les jeunes ainsi que la cocréation de contenus de sensibilisation ;Plaidoyer public pour la réalisation des droits des enfants en situation de pandémie avec la mobilisation de célébrités et enfants défenseurs des droits de l'enfant ;Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs nationaux en matière de RCCE ;La génération d'évidences pour orienter la planification RCCE ;Le développement et la mise en œuvre de partenariats innovants.
Presenters
ME
Meriam ERRAOUI
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors Hala Benjelloun Andaloussi
Ministère De La Santé Maroc
HB
Hala Benjelloun Andalousi
Ministère De La Santé Maroc
Using Behavioural Insights to Understand and Encourage COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance in Ghana
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Despite the importance of vaccines being well documented (Cella et al., 2020), during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health officials were challenged with people's hesitation to get fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccine hesitancy was identified as one of the top ten global health threats in 2019 (WHO, 2019). As of March 2022, 16% of Ghana's population is fully vaccinated. This two-part study leverages a behavioural insights (BI) approach to detect implicit drivers of vaccine acceptance in Ghana. The proposed BI approach employs a Define, Diagnose, Design and Test methodology. First, a survey administered using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system focused on respondents' vaccination status, their intentions to get vaccinated in the future, self-reported attitudes towards the vaccine, and factors such as perceived risk, social norms, and ease of getting vaccinated. After completing this part of the survey, respondents heard a jingle encouraging them to get vaccinated and were again asked about their intentions. Respondents were randomly assigned to one of six messages, which varied with respect to the messengers portrayed (i.e., healthcare workers, doctors, and religious leaders) and the message framing (i.e., fear, altruism, and social norms). All data have been collected, and at the time of this writing, data analysis is nearing completion, which includes confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), analysis of variances (ANOVA), chi-square tests, multiple regression, and relative weights analysis. The results of this study will play a crucial role in understanding vaccination behaviours and developing effective COVID-19 vaccine campaigns in Ghana.
Presenters
SV
Swathi Vepachedu
Anastasiia Nurzhynska
UNICEF
Co-authors
AL
Anna-Leena Lohiniva
PA
Paul Ayiku
VIAMO
JA
Joshua Amo-Adjei
Kantar Public, Ghana
MS
Mrunal Shetye
UNICEF Ghana
JB
Julianne Birungi
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
JS
Joseph Sherlock
Duke University
LF
Lori Foster
Building Vaccine Confidence within Communities through Religious and Traditional Leaders: An Example from Sokoto State, Nigeria
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Even though the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the uptake of vaccines to reduce the effect of Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) across the world, there was a lot of misinformation about its efficacy across different communities in Nigeria. These included conspiracy theories around population control, change of genetic composition, potential to cause sterility, amongst others. 
This made accelerating uptake of COVID-19 vaccines very difficult especially within rural communities. Sokoto State, which is a religious powerhouse within the country had one of the lowest uptake of the vaccines in Northern Nigeria with only 1.58% of the eligible population having received their first dose as at December 2021. Whereas, Nigeria has a national target of at least 50% uptake of the vaccines among the eligible population by March 2022.
Considering the importance attached to religion in Sokoto state, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded Breakthrough ACTION project collaborated with the State's health officials to engage religious and traditional leaders to identify the reasons for vaccine hesitancy, debunk rumors and provide them with accurate information. This helped the religious leaders to develop their own key messages to encourage vaccine uptake within their communities. Through this effort, the number of fully vaccinated persons in Sokoto state increased by five-fold in two months. 
Identifying and engaging trusted voices such as religious leaders as behavior change agents is critical to improve outcomes of public health responses especially during emergencies, as this helps to build confidence in recommended behaviors.
Presenters Olayinka Umar-Farouk
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors
OO
Omolara Oyinlola
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
MG
Mukhtar Gaya
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
SS
Sabyen Sheni
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
IF
Isah Fakai
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Coaching as a social behavior change approach to health provider skills building
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
While health provider capacity hampers service delivery in low-resource setting, behavior change interventions can be used to improve skills and knowledge. Many countries rely on didactic training with minimal on-the-job exposure. Coaching as an intervention can help reduce the skills gap while ensuring retention of knowledge among health providers even with exit of funders.
Presenters Njeri Mbugua
None, Jhpiego
Rishta Na Soch Badlio (Change your mindset, not your relationships): Developing Stigma-Reduction Campaigns for People Living with HIV in District Larkana, Sindh, Pakistan
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
April 2019 marked an HIV epidemic in Ratodero Town, District Larkana, Pakistan, where over 1100 children were diagnosed with HIV. Previous HIV campaigns have relied upon medicalized messaging, which may have further perpetuated stigma. To address stigma against people living with HIV (PLHIV), a contextualized three-month-long mass communications campaign, Sujaag (meaning 'To-Awaken'), was piloted in Ratodero Town  - the epicenter of the outbreak. 
Formative research conducted through a survey with 404 respondents, revealed that people held negative perceptions towards children and adults living with HIV (scores of 67% and 69% respectively). Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) revealed that the majority of community concerns were non-medical and centered around the social aspects of the disease. In light of this context, the campaign focused on strengthening social ties for PLHIV: Rishta Na, Soch Badlio (meaning 'change mindsets, not relationships'). Branded local vehicles, interactive social media, and television advertisements, were deployed around this key message.
At the campaign's conclusion, 395 respondents were surveyed: 30.3% were exposed to at least one campaign feature. Those exposed had an aggregate score of 72%, reflecting a moderate to high HIV knowledge and perceptions score, compared to 63% amongst those not exposed. Post-campaign FGDs indicated that emphasis on lived realities had an impact on PLHIV and their families' communal lives.
Sujaag aligned the campaign to community insights and showcased destigmatizing attitudes via narrative of communities celebrating life together. Contextual campaigns building social capital can address HIV stigma effectively by improving knowledge and perceptions.
Presenters Kainat Khurshid
Interactive Research & Development
Co-authors
SH
Syed Aun Haider
Interactive Research & Development
UA
Usman Ali Ahmed
Interactive Research & Development
HJ
Hashmat Jatoi
MS
Mohammad Tahir Sario
Interactive Research & Development
RS
Raja Sarfraz Saroh
Interactive Research & Development
JS
Junaid-ur-Rehman Siddiqui
The Aga Khan University, Pakistan
Mehek Ali
IRD Global
MK
Myra Khan
IRD Global
Testing Non-Traditional Approaches to Increase COVID-19 Vaccination Rates in South Africa
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
PLM is a public-private partnership that deploys The Coca-Cola Company's supply-chain management and marketing expertise to support African governments in strengthening access to and uptake of health commodities and services. With support from USAID, since September 2021 PLM has worked with the NDoH in South Africa to improve uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. 
In the early stages of the COVID-19 vaccine roll-out, NDoH needed to share how, why, and where eligible and willing population segments could be vaccinated. As vaccine roll-out progressed and COVID-19 restrictions relaxed, there was increased complacency and a reduced sense of vaccination as a priority, slowing vaccine uptake rates, particularly amongst young people.
Initially, PLM implemented a mass media strategy, reaching an average of 27 million people per month through mass media channels. In early 2022, as vaccine uptake slowed, a need for more targeted interventions emerged. PLM began to test a range of non-traditional platforms to reach and motivate segments with low vaccine uptake, especially focused on youth 12-35Y.
These interventions included engaging with TikTok and Radio DJ influencers, nudges and incentives, micro-influencers, and community influencers to spread approved vaccine messaging. The digital format for the campaigns enabled innovative approaches to evaluate the impact of the campaigns.
Learnings from the non-traditional platforms tested can offer insights on how to effectively adapt and tailor different communications platforms as risk communications needs evolve, and how to leverage a range of communications interventions to reach specific target groups.
Presenters Camilla Osborne
Project Last Mile
Utilisation de Facebook comme un outil de communication pour la sensibilisation dans la lutte contre le COVID-19 et la vaccination.
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Le COVID-19 a changé le mode vie avec les confinements et les distanciations sociales obligatoires.  Chacun est resté chez lui tout en essayant de rester connecté aux autres grâce aux réseaux sociaux, notamment Facebook.  Il a été ainsi utilisé comme un canal de communication, notamment dans la lutte contre le COVID-19 et  la vaccination.
PSI Madagascar a bénéficié d'une opportunité de collaboration avec Facebook qui a octroyé une formation en ligne pour optimiser l'utilisation de ce réseau social, en tant qu'outil de communication pour le changement social et comportemental dans la lutte contre le COVID-19. Un crédit de communication a été également alloué pour faire des publications boostées. 
Trois phases de campagnes de communication ont été menées d'Avril à Décembre 2021. A chaque phase, différents constats et leçons ont été tirés afin d'augmenter le nombre de personnes atteintes ainsi que les réactions obtenues.
Utiliser Facebook comme outil de communication offre de nombreuses possibilités et avantages comparativement aux canaux traditionnels. En effet, on peut piloter et ajuster plus rapidement les campagnes, comme le choix des visuels, messages, ciblages précis … et surtout avoir une plus grande interaction avec le public.
Cependant, dans le cas présent du COVID et de la vaccination, le changement social et comportemental est complexe car il résulte de multiples expériences, influences, croyances et valeurs personnelles. Faire évoluer les attitudes à l'égard des vaccins par Facebook seul est insuffisant. D'autres interventions de communication complémentaires à plusieurs niveaux (masse, personnel, communautaire, institutionnel) sont nécessaires.
Presenters
NR
Nathalie RANDRIAMANGA
Population Services International (PSI)
CR
Christian RANAIVO
PSI
Facilitating large scale behaviour change and collective action through DigiRedio Social and Behaviour Change Platform
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Presenters Catherine Lengewa
Centre For Behavior Change And Communication
Getting it Right: Scaled Items to Measure Individual Motivation to Seek Out COVID-19 Vaccination
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Across the globe behavioral research is being used to understand what motivates individuals to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Behavioral models and theories ground much of this research but scaled items to measure motivation are not readily available to practitioners. As part of our COVID-19 vaccine demand creation work, FHI 360 developed scaled items to measure elements of motivation based on the BJ Fogg Behavioral Model (FBM). According to the FBM, elements of motivation include hope and fear, pleasure and pain, and social acceptance and rejection. 
 
Using the FBM as a guide, we conducted formative research to understand people's motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Yopougon Est, Cote d'Ivoire. Data from this formative research were used to develop scaled items for each FBM element. We then used cognitive interviews to assess whether the scaled items accurately measured the elements of interest for people in Yopougon-Est. 
 
In this poster, we describe our experience developing and testing scaled items to understand determinants of COVID-19 vaccination uptake in Côte d'Ivoire. We present the final items and discuss strategies for using cognitive interviews to contextualize them. These scaled items can be adapted and used by practitioners to understand motivational factors of vaccine uptake and hesitancy in other contexts. 
U-Report for Risk Communication and Community Engagement – COVID-19 Vaccine Chatbot and Awareness Campaigns in Uganda
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
UNICEF, together with the Uganda Ministry of Health (MOH) and other partners adopted U-Report as a risk communication tool to help combat the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. U-Report, through polls, alerts, and the COVID-19 vaccine chatbot was used to reinforce key messages on COVID-19 preventive measures, vaccine awareness campaigns, and assessments on vaccine compliance and acceptance.
Overall, 135,885 U-Reporters benefited from the RCCE interventions including through the COVID-19 vaccine chatbot, polls, alerts and awareness messages conducted in response to the vaccine hesitancy. Data received from the rapid assessment on vaccine acceptance and compliance polls enabled UNICEF and MOH communications teams to address concerns and safeguard against anti-vaccination rumors and misinformation. 
U-Report is best positioned for use as a risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) tool during emergencies and disease outbreaks. Dissemination of life saving information and flagging out emerging issues within the communities across the country is another effective use of the tool. The platform is fast, cost-effective, reaches many people at once, and provides opportunities for direct communication with affected people including those in hard-to-reach areas.


Presenters Douglas Lubowa Sebba
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors
MC
Mandi Chikombero
UNICEF Uganda
FN
Fatuma Namukose
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
AO
Abraham Okiror
UNICEF
Leveraging digital tools to decrease contraceptive misconceptions and increase use among youth in Cambodia
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Low modern contraceptive use among youth in Cambodia and recognition of young adulthood as a critical period to establish social norms and behavioral patterns led Population Services International's Promoting Healthy Behaviors Activity (PHB), with funding from USAID, to design a digital campaign for youth to provide a safe space for youth in Cambodia to learn about sex and sexuality, prevent unplanned pregnancy and plan for their future. The results of the six month campaign, launched in January 2022, will be assessed through social media data and a pre and post quiz advertised on Facebook at the start and end of the campaign measuring changes in knowledge, attitude and social norms on SRH and modern methods, and misconceptions around FP use.
Till date the digital campaign has reached over 800,000 youth. The pre-assessment quiz, completed by 182 youth aged 18-29 years old in Phnom Penh in early 2022, found that only 24% of youth correctly recall the five modern methods of contraception (male condom, pills, injection, implant and IUD). 14% of participants incorrectly stated that use of modern methods will affect future fertility while 19% believed that prior use of an IUD will affect future fertility. 37% of respondents believe that women need their partners approval before using contraception. Youth are a critical priority for SRH SBC interventions and the exclusive use of digital tools and youth-friendly digital touchpoints can provide a sustainable and cost-effective way to raise awareness of SRH issues and encourage use of modern contraception.
Presenters Socheata Kong
17Triggers
Co-authors
SS
Shwetha Srinivasan
JM
Jim Malster
Population Services International (PSI)
Réponses des sciences sociales et actions CREC COVID-19 : Inverser la tendance du faible recours à la vaccination par le personnel de santé en temps de défiance vaccinale au Cameroun
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Presenters
AF
Albert Legrand Fosso
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
SBCC in a pandemic: Promoting COVID-19 preventive behaviours through the Powerful HANDS campaign
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
As the national lockdown eased off and people returned to a semblance of their normal life, risk perception decreased as evidenced by a low-level of compliance with non-pharmaceutical preventive measures. To address this, the Center for Communication and Social Impact (CCSI) supported the design and implementation of the Powerful HANDS campaign.
The Powerful HANDS campaign was a national, social and behaviour change (SBC) communication campaign in Nigeria, targeted at reducing the spread of COVID-19 by increasing the adoption of non-pharmaceutical preventive measures. It communicated the key message that "the power to stop Covid-19 is in our H.A.N.D.S". The acronym HANDS innovatively depicts the five key COVID-19 preventive actions in a simple manner:
H- Have your hands washed or sanitized frequently; A-Always cough or sneeze into your elbow;  N- No going out without a face mask;  D- Distance of at least two arm's length should be maintained; and  S - Stay indoors and self-isolate if you feel sick. This abstract shares learnings from the implementation of the HANDS campaign which include positive behaviour deviants, leveraging on existing structures and engaging persons living with Disability (PLWDs). Key lessons drawn from the implementation of this campaign include managing distrust of the government regarding  Covid-19 through other community structures such as market leaders. Also, in programming for PLWDs, lessons include need to  modify  COVID19 messaging for this group as they might require a human aid thereby rendering physical distancing impossible to practice.
Presenters Adenike Ayodele
Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Co-authors Toluwalope Ayanwola
Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Babafunke Fagbemi
Centre For Communication And Social Impact
YD
Yahya Disu
Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
Adeola Olunloyo
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Rufus Eshuchi
UNICEF Nigeria
The messenger is the message: The Coach Mpilo model as a true peer approach to addressing men’s barriers to HIV testing and treatment in South Africa
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Formative research under the Mpilo project in South Africa found that a lack of safe, relatable sources of support was a significant barrier to engagement with HIV testing and treatment. In response, we conducted a series of workshops with 82 men, aiming to design 'the right source of support'. The Coach Mpilo model emerged from that process.
Coach Mpilo employs men living well with HIV, both clinically and psychosocially, as life coaches to men who are struggling with various barriers. Coaches provide one-on-one mentoring, tailored to each client's needs, drawing on personal experience.
The Coach Mpilo pilot showed high acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness. 96% of clients were linked or returned to treatment during the pilot period, of which 95% were retained in care at pilot endline. 16% experienced at least one treatment interruption, though 82% of those returned to treatment during the pilot period.
The Coach Mpilo model demonstrates that a PLHIV-led peer support approach can be acceptable, feasible and effective in helping men overcome barriers to HIV treatment and achieving high rates of linkage and early retention. 
The model also demonstrates that the right messenger is as important as the right message. By leading with personal vulnerability and drawing on lived experience, coaches have been able to break through to their clients in a way that other healthcare providers have struggled to do.
Coach Mpilo challenges the conventional wisdom that men are 'difficult' or 'hard to reach'. It may just be that they need the right source of support.
Presenters Shawn Malone
Population Services International (PSI)
Co-authors
LR
Letitia Rambally-Greener
PSI
PP
Paris Pitsillides
Matchboxology
NH
Nina Hasen
PSI
The role of gender, couple communication, and media exposure for vaccine acceptance and prevention among female and male adolescents in Liberia
Poster Session 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Presenters
JB
Jen Boyle
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors
ST
Samantha Tsang
JM
Joseph Millward
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
JK
J Ben Kitson
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tyler Best
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
LL
Lindsey Leslie
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
EG
Eric Gaye
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Christian Doe
Research Innovation Hub
SO
Saratu Olabode-Ojo
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
NK
Nandita Kapadia Kundu
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
The role of partners, parents and friends in shaping young women’s reproductive choices in Peri-urban Nairobi: A Qualitative Study
Poster SessionResearch-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
Contraceptive use among young women in Nairobi remains low despite high general knowledge of family planning methods. This paper draws on social norms theory to explore the role of key influencers in women's FP use and how women anticipate normative reactions or sanctions from partners, parents and friends. This qualitative study was conducted with 16 women, 10 men and 14 key influencers across 7 peri-urban wards in Nairobi, Kenya in 2020. Interviews were conducted by phone and data was organized into themes identified during the analysis. Our findings suggest that women consult various key influencers based on the information they need or the choices they are making in relation to family planning. Women identified parents, specifically mothers, aunts, partners, friends and healthcare workers as their preferred contacts on family planning. Their interactions with key influencers shaped their decisions to use or access FP based on a key influencer's experiences, information and norms they perpetuate or challenge on FP. Our findings have implications for interventions aiming to increase family planning among young women and underscore the importance of network-level intervention delivery, of considering the normative influence key actors have on women's FP choices, and of targeting social norms surrounding family planning use to challenge misconceptions and misinformation.  
Presenters
AZ
Anja Zinke-Allmang
LSHTM
Co-authors
AB
Amiya Bhatia
London School Of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
KG
Krittika Gorur
Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
RH
Rahma Hassan
University Of Nairobi
AS
Amy Shipow
Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
CO
Concilia Ogolla
Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
KK
Kees Keizer
University Of Groningen
BC
Ben Cislaghi
LSHTM
Getting ready for COVID-19 vaccination: How a global network of district and health facility health workers formed a global digital network to generate and share success stories to overcome vaccine hesitancy
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
The COVID-19 Peer Hub is the world's largest network of sub-national immunization and other Primary Health Care (PHC) professionals, nurtured by The Geneva Learning Foundation (www.learning.foundation) and connecting  over 43,000 health professionals from 137 countries, across system levels and national and organizational boundaries. More than 80% of participants work in districts and health facilities and over half are government workers. Over four weeks in November 2020, in response to the inadequacy of prescriptive guidelines and descriptions of hesitancy, 734 Peer Hub participants developed, peer reviewed, and revised their own case studies, each one describing and analyzing a situation in which they had used their own, local capacity to help an individual or group overcome initial hesitancy or fear of vaccination, leading to vaccine acceptance. The primary purpose of the case studies was to foster reflective learning between peers, many of whom were likely to become involved in COVID-19 vaccine introduction. This peer learning exercise had startling effects, above and beyond expectations, for individual participants, to strengthen the network they formed, and for their countries' readiness for COVID-19 vaccine. Supporting health workers, already recognized as trusted advisors to communities, requires new ways of listening, new ways of supporting, new ways of measuring, documenting and learning. It also requires new ways of recognizing the leadership of immunization staff who work at the local level under often difficult conditions.
Presenters Reda Sadki
The Geneva Learning Foundation
Co-authors
MZ
Min Zha
The Geneva Learning Foundation
CM
Charlotte Mbuh
The Geneva Learning Foundation
IS
Ian Steed
The Geneva Learning Foundation
Behaviorally-informed solutions to overcome COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and facilitate uptake across contexts
Poster SessionPractice-oriented proposals 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/06 14:30:00 UTC - 2022/12/06 15:15:00 UTC
The USAID-funded Breakthrough ACTION project includes behavioral design activities related to COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake across a range of countries, including Liberia, Cote d'Ivoire, and Cameroon, targeting priority populations like facility-based health providers as well as the general population. We leveraged insights from behavioral science and qualitative, contextual investigation in each country to identify key behavioral barriers and channels to vaccination. Given overlapping barriers and channels, several innovative and behaviorally-informed solutions have resonated across country co-creation workshops and are currently being adapted through iterative user testing to their respective contexts. These include a peer invitation to the vaccine, intended to increase the visibility of peers who have successfully vaccinated by prompting people to explain why they got the vaccine and to encourage their peer to get vaccinated as well. Another example is a professional forum in which influential health workers are invited to hear tailored information about the vaccine and have the opportunity to ask questions to a trusted source. We will share insights from the user testing process on how these solutions were received in their respective contexts, and any additional insights from piloting and scale-up to share later this year. While there are differences in specific vaccine concerns and priorities across populations, there are also emerging behavioral insights that continue to resonate strongly across contexts. They can be leveraged immediately to support uptake in LMICs with low vaccination rates and a large "moveable middle" expressing some hesitancy to vaccinate.
Presenters
SF
Sara Flanagan
Ideas42
Co-authors
RK
Rahin Khandker
Ideas42
SL
Stephanie Levy
Ideas42
AS
Allison Schachter
Jana Smith
Ideas42
RN
Rene Nkenyi
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Benjamin Soro
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
LL
Lindsey Leslie
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
JW
Juliet Wilson Gaigaie
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
,
FHI 360
,
Population Services International (PSI)
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
+ 28 more speakers. View All
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Mr. Rizwan  Ahmed
,
UNICEF Pakistan
 Ladidi Bako-Aiyegbusi
Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria.
Dr. Mohamed Vall Belbellah
Association Mauritanienne de la Promotion de la Famille AMPF
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