Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Gender | Research Karam 4 - English, Français interpretation Preformed Panel Presentation
Dec 05, 2022 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM(Africa/Casablanca)
20221205T1400 20221205T1515 Africa/Casablanca Moving beyond Small Group Reflection: Norms Shifting Happens Everywhere!

Social norms play an important role in many health and development outcomes and are often a focus of social and behavioral change and communication (SBCC) programs. Over the last five years, over 900 individuals from more than 150 organizations have joined together in a global network of five Learning Collaboratives to Advance Research and Practice on Normative Change (LC) to advance collective knowledge of social norms; what they are, how to measure them, how they influence behavior, and how to implement and scale interventions to address them. LC members have identified an over-emphasis on community-based, small-group approaches to shift social norms and called for action to address this gap. 

This panel, organized by the LC, will bring together members to discuss approaches to norms shifting that go beyond small group reflection and have the potential to achieve change at a scale that could feasibly reach a tipping point of norms change. These approaches range from the use of social marketing to shift norms, to translating social norms evidence into campaigns to achieve macro-level norm change, and institutionalizing gender-transformative approaches by integration into government policies and structures. There will also be a presentation on a systematic review and meta-analysis of social norms intervention studies aimed at shifting tobacco use.

The panelists will address the ongoing debate over recent emphasis on social norms-focused interventions, how they fit into the SBCC field and whether this focus provides undue emphasis on community mobilization and small group reflection.

Karam 4 - English, Français interpretation International Social and Behavior Change Communication Summit info@sbccsummit.org
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Social norms play an important role in many health and development outcomes and are often a focus of social and behavioral change and communication (SBCC) programs. Over the last five years, over 900 individuals from more than 150 organizations have joined together in a global network of five Learning Collaboratives to Advance Research and Practice on Normative Change (LC) to advance collective knowledge of social norms; what they are, how to measure them, how they influence behavior, and how to implement and scale interventions to address them. LC members have identified an over-emphasis on community-based, small-group approaches to shift social norms and called for action to address this gap. 

This panel, organized by the LC, will bring together members to discuss approaches to norms shifting that go beyond small group reflection and have the potential to achieve change at a scale that could feasibly reach a tipping point of norms change. These approaches range from the use of social marketing to shift norms, to translating social norms evidence into campaigns to achieve macro-level norm change, and institutionalizing gender-transformative approaches by integration into government policies and structures. There will also be a presentation on a systematic review and meta-analysis of social norms intervention studies aimed at shifting tobacco use.

The panelists will address the ongoing debate over recent emphasis on social norms-focused interventions, how they fit into the SBCC field and whether this focus provides undue emphasis on community mobilization and small group reflection.

Social Norms Change and Tobacco Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Interventions
Preformed PanelPractice-oriented proposals 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/05 13:00:00 UTC - 2022/12/05 14:15:00 UTC
Tobacco use kills over eight million individuals annually, and results in substantial economic and human capital loss across nations. While effective policy solutions to tobacco control exist, these approaches are less effective at promoting cessation among heavy smokers and smokers living in weaker tobacco control policy environments. Thus, effective demand-side tobacco control approaches such as shifting social norms around tobacco use are needed. However, the scholarship on the conceptualization, measurement, and intervention applications of social norms is diverse and occasionally conflicting. This study synthesizes this vast terrain by focusing on the effectiveness, measurement, modality, and underlying mechanisms of NSIs around and actual tobacco use.
A systematic review and meta-analysis of social norms intervention studies aimed at shifting tobacco use was conducted. Social norms change interventions had a small but significant effect on both tobacco and social norms outcomes (g = 0.229, SE = 0.04, p<.001 and g = 0.282, SE=0.101, p=0.011). The studies were characterized by an extremely high level of heterogeneity, explained to some degree by a priori specified covariates. Resistance skills training emerged as a social norms change mechanism not previously described as such in the literature. Descriptive norms were the most common type of measured social norm, followed by injunctive norms.
Social norms change interventions are an effective approach to changing normative perceptions of tobacco use and actual tobacco use. Future research and programs should adopt a consistent approach to reporting and implementing these mechanisms to shift tobacco use, as well as other modifiable health risk behaviors.
Presenters Shaon Lahiri
University Of Pennsylvania
Learning from scaling-up a gender-transformative couples’ intervention to reduce IPV and promote gender equality in Rwanda
Preformed Panel 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/05 13:00:00 UTC - 2022/12/05 14:15:00 UTC
Institutionalizing gender-transformative approaches by integrating them into governments' policies and structure has the potential to amplify changes in attitudes, behaviors and norms at a large scale in sustainable, cost-effective ways. However, despite growing attention to the importance of scaling up projects, evidence around how to do so while maintaining effectiveness, quality and fidelity is still scarce. To address this gap, Equimundo (formerly known as Promundo-US) will share lessons learned supporting the institutionalization of Program P (called Bandebereho in Rwanda), a gender-transformative parent training to engage men as positive, nonviolent and equitable fathers and couples implemented in over 20 countries and scaled up to different extents in a few countries. In Rwanda, Equimundo and the Rwanda Men's Resource Centre are collaborating with the Ministry of Health through a strong and long-term partnership to scale this approach via the health system by engaging community health workers. Lessons learned from this scaling up effort provide important insights into the factors that support successful institutionalization and will help understand if one program model can effectively be tailored to and scaled up in different contexts. Results from this experience can help organizations and policy makers understand better how to bring change through scaling gender-transformative prevention programming via government institutions and structures 
Presenters Clara Alemann
Equimundo
Experiences of using findings on social norms to inform public support strategies
Preformed PanelPractice-oriented proposals 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/05 13:00:00 UTC - 2022/12/05 14:15:00 UTC
Harmful social norms are a key barrier to achieving gender justice and positive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) outcomes. Social norms are deeply held, shared beliefs about what are considered normal, acceptable and appropriate ways of thinking and behaving that often drive behaviour. The Right Here Right Now (RHRN) programme includes a focus on macro-level social norm change, aiming to build public support as a core component of creating an enabling environment for young people's SRHR. Public support initiatives are accompanied by information and education for young people, policy advocacy, and strengthening civil society, in a multi-component approach.
The presentation draws on experiences in Tunisia and Nepal, where RHRN partners are employing participatory community-based methods to explore norms in relation to youth SRHR. In these contexts, understanding social norms is seen as increasingly important in light of growing conservatism limiting efforts to promote youth SRHR. Taking an action research approach, Rutgers is working with partners in both countries to document how norms assessments findings can be used to develop targeted campaigns that identify and target 'low hanging fruits' aiming to achieve social norm shifts, as well as informing other aspects of the multi-component approach. Through reflection meetings learning is gathered on challenges and recommendations for the process of using social norms findings to inform public support campaign. Emerging data will also be available on the impact of the campaigns, gathered using a social listening methodology.
Presenters Anna Page
Rutgers Netherlands
Social marketing as a strategy to change social norms: Evidence and case studies from LMIC
Preformed PanelPractice-oriented proposals 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/05 13:00:00 UTC - 2022/12/05 14:15:00 UTC
Social norms are a form of social influence predicated on the idea that human beings' fundamental need to belong in society causes individuals to hold attitudes and beliefs, and engage in behaviors, that are similar to referent others. Social marketing is the application of "marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good".
This presentation aims to connect the dots between social marketing and social norms based on three evidence-based case studies illustrating how social marketing can change norms. First, in Rwanda, an existing branded program called Ni Nyampinga (NN) designed to empower and promote agency in girls was adapted using social marketing to build positive social norms for HPV vaccination. Second, in Sudan, a social marketing program called Saleema was used to change social norms about female genital mutilation (FGM). Third, in Bangladesh, Kenya and Nigeria, modern cookstoves were promoted using social marketing campaigns.
In Rwanda, we found a clear preference and HPV knowledge effects for the branded NN story telling messages compared to methods that did not use social marketing. In Sudan, results showed a positive effect of increased anti-FGM social norms as a function of exposure to the Saleema campaign. Finally, in Bangladesh, Kenya, and Nigeria, results showed improved norms about purchase and use of modern cookstoves as a function of exposure to the social marketing campaigns. 
This shows that utilizing social marketing approaches to promote and create role models that promote positive norms helps to shift norms.
Presenters William Evans
The George Washington University School Of Public Health
The George Washington University School of Public Health
Equimundo
Rutgers Netherlands
University of Pennsylvania
,
University of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
 Rebecka Lundgren
,
University of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
 Hamza Yormamadov
No specific considerations
,
World Food Programme
USAID/Philippines
 Marilyn Akinola
University of California, San Diego
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
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