Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) Karam 1 - English, Español, Français, عربي interpretation Panel Presentation
Dec 08, 2022 04:50 PM - 06:15 PM(Africa/Casablanca)
20221208T1650 20221208T1815 Africa/Casablanca Thinking Differently about FP: Where Research Can Lead Us Karam 1 - English, Español, Français, عربي interpretation International Social and Behavior Change Communication Summit info@sbccsummit.org
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Tsismis (Gossip) and Anxiety: Digging Deep to Uncover and Creatively Address Barriers to FP Use in the Philippines
Oral PresentationResearch-oriented proposals 04:45 PM - 06:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/08 15:45:00 UTC - 2022/12/08 17:15:00 UTC
Contraceptive use in the Philippines is stagnant at around 40% and has been for almost a decade. Family planning is easily accessible, culturally acceptable, and free. So why are there so many women who do not desire a child right now not using an FP method? Clearly it is time to think differently about FP. To begin, the USAID ReachHealth project, USAID's flagship family planning (FP) project in the Philippines, conducted an innovative qualitative research study to explore motivators and barriers to FP and to better understand discontinuation. In depth interviews that included innovative qualitative tools specifically designed for this study, with women and men revealed that the barriers to FP use are not structural as much as they are social and cognitive. We also found that a large segment of sexually active women is underserved-so much so that many do not realize that they are "allowed" to use FP. The findings were incorporated into the National FP Communication Strategy, drafted in February 2020, and formed the basis for several innovative approaches. Did they work? An impact study to evaluate the two major campaigns will be conducted in Spring 2022 and the results will be discussed.
Presenters Cathy Church-Balin
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors
'K
'Kuor Kumoji
Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Combining Behavioral Science and Multiple-Touchpoint Service Design to Promote Postpartum Family Planning in Tigray, Ethiopia: Evaluation of a Behavioral Postpartum Family Planning Intervention
Oral Presentation 04:45 PM - 06:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/08 15:45:00 UTC - 2022/12/08 17:15:00 UTC
Despite progress in addressing nonuse of contraception through traditional social and behavior change (SBC), these programs can be limited by mismatches between a woman's personal preferences, the barriers she faces, and the interventions designed to help her voluntarily access and use contraception correctly and consistently. The (re)solve project in Tigray, Ethiopia used behavioral science to design and test scalable solutions for postpartum women to improve contraceptive intention, modern contraceptive use, contraceptive self-efficacy, and pregnancy risk. The objective of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of the (re)solve solution set in Tigray, Ethiopia.
We conducted an impact evaluation using a mixed-methods quasi-experimental study. The (re)solve intervention had a positive effect on postpartum women's intention to use contraception, though this did not reach statistical significance. A somewhat larger and significant association was detected with other behavioral outcomes such as modern contraceptive use, contraceptive self-efficacy, and pregnancy risk assessment. Qualitative data indicate that providers had a positive experience with the different (re)solve tools and found them acceptable and easy to implement. In addition, providers liked using the (re)solve tools as they filled gaps in existing counseling, tools, and training related to postpartum family planning. Despite the overall positive experience, several providers noted the challenges of using different provider-based reference guides and tools which resulted in many suggestions to find ways to integrate these tools rather than having standalone tools. Future work should explore strategies to integrate and scale up the (re)solve solution set within the existing health system.
Presenters
CA
Cecelia Angelone
Pathfinder International
Co-authors
LH
Laura Hinson
International Center For Research On Women
Mohamad Brooks
Pathfinder International
KB
Kesete Berhane
Pathfinder International
GG
Gebremedhin Gebrehiwot
Pathfinder International
HB
Hailemariam Berhe
Mekelle University
AA
Atsbaha Abraha
Mekelle University
RT
Reshma Trasi
Pathfinder International
Interventions to Promote Self-Efficacy and Family Planning Use in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Oral Presentation 04:45 PM - 06:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/08 15:45:00 UTC - 2022/12/08 17:15:00 UTC
Although we know that self-efficacy is a construct that is commonly targeted by social and behavior change (SBC) interventions in global health, there appears to be a limited number of studies that explicitly measure the impact of SBC interventions on self-efficacy and family planning, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature on SBC interventions to promote self-efficacy and positive family planning outcomes in LMICs. After the search and screening process of the review, we included 8 studies in this review. The results indicate what types of SBC interventions are used to enhance self-efficacy to promote family planning outcomes in LMICs, as well as which types of SBC interventions have successfully increased self-efficacy and promoted positive family planning outcomes. The review also presents the variety of indicators that are used to measure self-efficacy in LMICs and calls attention to the challenges of measuring this construct and the importance of using valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy in intervention research. Finally, based on the current evidence, we make recommendations for future SBC interventions to increase self-efficacy and promote positive family planning outcomes in LMICs.
Presenters
LS
Lindsay Swisher
United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Co-authors
MC
Maria Carrasco
AP
Annie Preaux
AM
Alexandria Mickler
USAID
The Next Evolution in Audience Segmentation for SBC Communication Programs: How Latent Transition Analysis Identified Contraceptive Ideational Profiles (CIPs) in Urban Senegal
Oral Presentation 04:45 PM - 06:15 PM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/08 15:45:00 UTC - 2022/12/08 17:15:00 UTC
In Senegal, 24 percent of married women who want to avoid pregnancy are not using modern contraceptive methods. Social, cultural, and cognitive factors are probable deterrents to contraceptive use. Improved understanding of women's ideational profiles as they relate to contraceptive readiness, decision-making, and health information preferences could help family planning (FP) programs better reach women with relevant and responsive content. The objective of this study was to identify and interpret meaningful contraceptive ideational profiles (CIPs) among urban Senegalese women and examine how and why CIP structure, interpretation, and membership changed over time. Using longitudinal data from 4,047 urban, in-union Senegalese women of reproductive age in 2011 and 2015, we applied latent transition analysis to identify and interpret prototypical profiles of women based on their contraceptive awareness, misconceptions, self-efficacy, partner FP acceptance, partner communication, and perceived community support. We identified four longitudinal CIPs and labeled them "CIP1: Lowest efficacy and FP awareness, highest misconceptions, unsupported," "CIP2: Low efficacy and FP awareness, rejects misconceptions, unsupported," "CIP3: Moderate efficacy, high FP awareness, high misconceptions, moderate support," and "CIP4: Highest efficacy and FP awareness, fewest misconceptions, most supported." Exposures to FP communication via TV, radio, religious leaders, and health workers were associated with lower odds of membership in less empowered CIPs, as was exposure to messages about the legitimacy of FP and birth spacing. This study demonstrated the potential of latent CIP methodologies to enhance current SBC approaches by identifying and responding to unique and complex ideational needs and skills.
Presenters Emily Mangone
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Co-authors
IS
Ilene Speizer
NG
Nisha Gottfredson
UNC Chapel Hill
KH
Kristen Hassmiller Lich
UNC Chapel Hill
MD
Marisa Domino
Arizona State University
BF
Bruce Fried
UNC Chapel Hill
Pathfinder International
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
,
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP)
The Manoff Group
World Relief
Dr. Mohamed Vall Belbellah
Association Mauritanienne de la Promotion de la Famille AMPF
,
Development Media International
Ms. Foyeke  Oyedokun-Adebagbo
,
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Ms. Lucille Dagpin-Galicha
RTI International
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