Climate/Environment | Entertainment Education | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups Karam 3 - English, Français interpretation Preformed Panel Presentation
Dec 05, 2022 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM(Africa/Casablanca)
20221205T1400 20221205T1515 Africa/Casablanca A Multifaceted Approach to Creating Stories that Empower Emerging Voices: Photography, 360 Video, Participatory Theater as Methods for Building Capacity and Indigenous Leadership in Amazonian Ecuador

In the heart of the Ecuadorian Amazon live the Waorani, self-proclaimed forest guardians who were introduced to vastly contrasting cultural values and customs only 80 years ago when missionaries and oil companies moved into the area in pursuit of their own moral and monetary interests. This encroachment has left most Waorani communities displaced and anguished. Individuals who have called this land home for generations now struggle to preserve their cultural identity and connection to place. Yet, the Waorani culture has always prized storytelling as a manner of passing down their rich ancestral wisdom. The power of storytelling has continued to thrive despite the colonial influences and emerging emphasis on adopting Western cultural traditions. Therefore, by tapping into the deeply entrenched community practice of storytelling through various forms, we have found a manner of approaching difficult community topics and issues to begin conversations about confronting them at the individual, familial, and communal level. In this session, the three presenters will demonstrate three unique approaches to gathering stories that transform, empower and build capacity in their work with the Waorani community in Amazonian Ecuador. Through photography, 360 immersive storytelling, and participatory theater (Forum theater), we have invited new ways of thinking about the present and future into the community through collaborative workshops, exhibitions, and qualitative research studies. We believe, while this is admittedly only the first step in a long process of decolonization and empowerment, storytelling forms such as these can provide the launch pad for creating opportunities for social change.

Karam 3 - English, Français interpretation International Social and Behavior Change Communication Summit info@sbccsummit.org
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In the heart of the Ecuadorian Amazon live the Waorani, self-proclaimed forest guardians who were introduced to vastly contrasting cultural values and customs only 80 years ago when missionaries and oil companies moved into the area in pursuit of their own moral and monetary interests. This encroachment has left most Waorani communities displaced and anguished. Individuals who have called this land home for generations now struggle to preserve their cultural identity and connection to place. Yet, the Waorani culture has always prized storytelling as a manner of passing down their rich ancestral wisdom. The power of storytelling has continued to thrive despite the colonial influences and emerging emphasis on adopting Western cultural traditions. Therefore, by tapping into the deeply entrenched community practice of storytelling through various forms, we have found a manner of approaching difficult community topics and issues to begin conversations about confronting them at the individual, familial, and communal level. In this session, the three presenters will demonstrate three unique approaches to gathering stories that transform, empower and build capacity in their work with the Waorani community in Amazonian Ecuador. Through photography, 360 immersive storytelling, and participatory theater (Forum theater), we have invited new ways of thinking about the present and future into the community through collaborative workshops, exhibitions, and qualitative research studies. We believe, while this is admittedly only the first step in a long process of decolonization and empowerment, storytelling forms such as these can provide the launch pad for creating opportunities for social change.

A Multifaceted Approach to Creating Stories that Empower Emerging Voices: Photography, 360 Video, Participatory Theater as Methods for Building Capacity and Indigenous Leadership in Amazonian Ecuador
Preformed PanelPractice-oriented proposals 09:15 AM - 10:30 AM (Africa/Casablanca) 2022/12/05 08:15:00 UTC - 2022/12/05 09:30:00 UTC
In the heart of the Ecuadorian Amazon live the Waorani, self-proclaimed forest guardians who were introduced to vastly contrasting cultural values and customs only 80 years ago when missionaries and oil companies moved into the area in pursuit of their own moral and monetary interests. This encroachment has left most Waorani communities displaced and anguished. Individuals who have called this land home for generations now struggle to preserve their cultural identity and connection to place. Yet, the Waorani culture has always prized storytelling as a manner of passing down their rich ancestral wisdom. The power of storytelling has continued to thrive despite the colonial influences and emerging emphasis on adopting Western cultural traditions. Therefore, by tapping into the deeply entrenched community practice of storytelling through various forms, we have found a manner of approaching difficult community topics and issues to begin conversations about confronting them at the individual, familial, and communal level. In this session, the three presenters will demonstrate three unique approaches to gathering stories that transform, empower and build capacity in their work with the Waorani community in Amazonian Ecuador. Through photography, 360 immersive storytelling, and participatory theater (Forum theater), we have invited new ways of thinking about the present and future into the community through collaborative workshops, exhibitions, and qualitative research studies. We believe, while this is admittedly only the first step in a long process of decolonization and empowerment, storytelling forms such as these can provide the launch pad for creating opportunities for social change.  
Presenters Saumya Pant
Ohio University
Co-authors Megan Westervelt
Ohio University & InitialEyes (nonprofit)
Jorge Castillo
Ohio University & Tropical Herping
NR
Nagesh Rao
Ohio University
Ohio University & Tropical Herping
,
Ohio University & InitialEyes (nonprofit)
Ohio University
,
Ohio University
,
Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary
Mr. Benjamin Soro
Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP)
Ministry of Health and Population
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
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