Sunday, Pre-Summit, Dec 04, 2022
09:30AM - 11:30AM
Karam 5
Skills-Building : Addressing Ableism, Disabilities Stigma & Discrimination
Format : Auxiliary Event
Join us for an interactive skill building session! Be one of the first to learn and apply evidence based tools from the first ever SBC resource pack to address Ableism, Stigma and Discrimination Towards Children With Disabilities And Their Families. Estimates suggest that there are 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, 240 thousand children with disabilities and 80% live in developing countries. Let's work together toward removing attitudinal, physical, organizational and communication barriers to build an inclusive society for all. The workshop will give you a brief overview of what disability is and share effective tools and strategy to collaborate with persons with disabilities, families, communities, service providers and policy-makers to address stigma and discrimination and support inclusion with the aim of supporting effective development and implementation of behaviour and social change interventions.Facilitators and co-facilitators: Young disability advocates - Daniela Gordon (Costa Rica), Dilian Danilov (Bulgaria), UNICEF SBC and Disability experts (TBC) 
10:00AM - 03:00PM
Reda 1
SMART Advocacy: Reaching the Right Decision-maker at the Right Time
Format : Auxiliary Event
SMART Advocacy focuses on decision-makers, the specific people with the power to act on requests from well-prepared champions. It prepares advocates to anticipate what information and insights will convince a decision-maker that taking a particular action will achieve their goals and yours. SMART Advocacy breaks down your goal into 9 steps across three phases. It shows you how to convince the people with power that taking action will achieve their goals and yours. By the end of the process, you will have an evidence-driven strategy that you can take forward confidently. This session will introduce participants to this useful process and will give participants an opportunity to demonstrate specific skills essential to successful advocacy.Lunch will be served.
10:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Fes 1a, and 1c
Dialogue with UNICEF SBC Global Think Tank
Format : Auxiliary Event
The purpose of this side event is to bring together and engage a wide audience of the SBC community, as internal and external stakeholders, in reviewing /generating ideas to inform systems strengthening and community engagement dimensions of SBC programming. Global Think Tank (TT) members will be present to explain and discuss work in progress. As a part of a co-creation process, participants' perspectives and feedback will be solicited in an interactive process to review and discuss the Global TT outputs listed below:•Systems Strengthening and Transformation through Social and Behaviour change: The Case of COVID-19 vaccination behaviour and lessons for Institutional leaders•Making the Investment Case for Social & Behaviour Change (IC4SBC)•Revisiting SBC Conceptual Frameworks and Case Studies from Afghanistan, Haiti, Malaysia, Somalia
11:00AM - 05:00PM
Karam 4
Sharing Learning from Polio SBC (Misinformation, Social Data and Conflict)
Format : Auxiliary Event
Over the past 30 years polio eradication action, including social and behaviour change, has received substantial investment and made demonstrable progress towards eradication. Though there has been remarkable progress, there have also been very significant challenges.The event is focused on three key themes: The utilization of social data to inform and improve SBC programming; misinformation strategies and action; and SBC in conflict settings on which there is substantial polio learning; key polio eradication challenges remain; and, there is significant relevance to challenges faced by action across the full range of development priorities, including increasing routine immunization rates. The purpose is to share and discuss learning from polio SBC that can be helpful to both next steps and challenges for polio SBC and the work and priorities of people engaged in other development issues.Light lunch provided.
01:00PM - 02:30PM
Fes 1a, and 1c
The Direction of SBC in UNICEF
Format : Auxiliary Event
UNICEF will present its vision for Social and Behaviour Change over the next few years and articulate how this function contributes to closing the gap towards the SDGs and achieving results for children across sectors. The session will feature examples of best and promising practices from the field across regions, global goods available to anyone working on SBC, and innovative efforts underway including in the area of evidence and measurement.
01:00PM - 05:00PM
Karam 2
Provider Behavior Change Expert Learning Forum
Format : Auxiliary Event
Speakers
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Attention to provider behavior change (PBC) needs and interventions has grown in recent years. Breakthrough ACTION is developing a PBC Ecosystem focused on reproductive, maternal, neonatal, and child health (RMNCH) that aims to assist program managers in: 1) identifying the drivers of provider behavior; 2) mapping PBC program strategies against those drivers according to effectiveness for improving RMNCH outcomes; and 3) highlighting areas for future development and research. During this learning forum, Breakthrough ACTION will share initial findings from a PBC review and solicit your input on the essential components of the Ecosystem. This is an opportunity to jointly identify RMNCH-related provider behavioral drivers and PBC strategies for addressing those drivers, and to contribute to determining programmatic priorities.
01:00PM - 05:00PM
Reda 4
Code of Ethics for Social and Behaviour Change: From Theory to Practice
Format : Auxiliary Event
Co-hosted by UNICEF and the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR), the Global Alliance for Social and Behaviour Change (GA4SBC) will host a 3-hour interactive session to explore the policies and practices needed to promote a SBC Code of Ethics' values. The session also will highlight measures to ensure benefits and address challenges during implementation. The session will focus on three topics:· Topic #1 Power and manipulation: avoidance of abuse of power and dominant power position (power elites) + dialogue, also including neo-colonialism and gender. · Topic #2 Behavioural Insights and nudge theory and practice · Topic #3 The debate about building business value vs. values within the local communities It will consist of a panel discussion that is followed by breakout groups where participants will have the opportunity to discuss a "good practice". The session will end with a report-out and an open discussion. The Global Alliance will circulate a summary report highlighting all the ideas presented at this event and promoting awareness of the topics discussed.
01:00PM - 05:00PM
Karam 3
Sex and Power: Pushing Ourselves and the Girls’ Rights Discourse Forward
Format : Auxiliary Event
We invite you to join CARE, Emory University, EMpower, and International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, for a half-day convening on Sunday, 4 December, from 13:00-17:00 for CEFM learning and cross-sharing. We will review evidence and discuss promising tools and approaches to sustainably combat the root causes of the practice.
03:00PM - 04:30PM
Fes 1a, and 1c
Community Engagement in Humanitarian Action
Format : Auxiliary Event
The side event pushes the agenda for people-centered programming as well as for improved preparedness and increased systematic investments for community engagement systems in humanitarian action. The vision of the new Community Engagement in Humanitarian Action Toolkit (CHAT) will be shared, and the event will explain how it contributes to scaling-up the mandate of Core Commitments for Childrens (CCCs) commitments of community engagement, SBC and accountability.
06:00PM - 08:00PM
Fes 1a, and 1c
UNICEF SBC Network Meeting - Opening (Private Meeting)
Format : Auxiliary Event
This is a meeting for all UNICEF Staff attending the summit to welcome everyone 
Monday, Day 1, Dec 05, 2022
07:00AM - 09:00AM
Additional auxiliary sessions coming soon!
Format : Auxiliary Session
07:00AM - 11:00AM
Registration Area
Registration
09:00AM - 11:00AM
Karam 4
What Works in Nutrition SBC?
Format : Auxiliary Event
SBC is fundamental to achieve global and national nutrition goals. Nutrition SBC requires applying best practice and innovations, while understanding what is unique about nutrition. This interactive session will share, discuss and combine SBC resources for use in development and humanitarian contexts, developed by USAID Advancing Nutrition. Nutrition SBC practitioners and SBC practitioners interested in nutrition welcome! Refreshments provided. 
10:45AM - 11:45AM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Welcome Coffee and Tea
11:45AM - 12:30PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Opening Ceremony
Format : Plenary
The session will kick-off the official opening of the 2022 International SBCC Summit. Opening remarks and welcome will be made by the Summit Secretariat and the Government of Morocco. This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
12:30PM - 01:45PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Opening Plenary Session - Social and Behavior Change Communication: People in Action Making Change Happen
Format : Plenary
Speakers
Memory Kachambwa
Eliana Elías, Minga Peru
Moderators
Clemencia Rodriguez, Temple University
While it is widely recognized that SBCC is at the core of development practice, people-centered communication initiatives are often questioned about their effectiveness, impact, and sustainability. In that context, this panel will examine the central role of communication in promoting people-led social and behavior change and will illustrate how SBCC has tackled challenges in areas such as sexual and reproductive health, women's empowerment and gender equality. This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Karam 1
Harnessing the Power of Youth for Impact
Format : Panel Presentation
Speakers
Lydia Murithi, Pathfinder International
Via Abellanosa, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gaone Manatong, The Dialogue Group
Alice Railton
Samira Saadu, Now Available Africa
Moderators
Varsha Chanda, Envisions Institute Of Development
SKY Girls: Creating a Girl-led Empowerment Movement for Tobacco Prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Gaone Manatong, The Dialogue Group
Alice Railton
Samira Saadu, Now Available Africa
SKY Girls is a pan-African behaviour change programme for adolescent girls focused on tobacco prevention, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. SKY Girls was launched in 2013 in Botswana because of a rise in youth tobacco use rates, and in response to the fact that youth female tobacco rates had begun to outstrip adult women's, suggesting a generational shift in attitudes and behaviour. SKY is now active in 5 target countries; Ghana, Kenya, Cote d'Ivoire, Zambia. SKY aims to reduce the aspirational value of tobacco, and build social competence in rejecting tobacco through multiple online and offline channels, from magazines, vlogs, social media, radio, feature-length films, school clubs and community events. Girls "join the movement" by taking the SKY pledge, a commitment device whereby they promise to be "true to myself" and use a choice mechanic to articulate what they do and don't want in their life. The channels deliver wide reach and multi-directional communication, creating a community where girls interact with each other and provide feedback loops to implementers. Co-creating content and placing girls at the forefront was central to SKY's strategy, with a network established to give girls a voice in the overall development and direction of the movement. A Tulane University evaluation found SKY to decrease girls' belief that their peers could justify smoking by 20 percentage points, and a University of Botswana study found a 25-percentage point decrease in the belief amongst girls that "most people my age smoke".
We Have to Help Young People Find Services: Co-Creating a Multilevel and Multisectoral Solution to Address Teenage Pregnancy
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Lucille Galicha, Research Triangle Institute - ReachHealth Project
Via Abellanosa, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Billie Puyat Murga, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Jeffry Lorenzo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Russel Cyra Borlongan, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Algin Gultia, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Teenage pregnancy is a national social emergency in the Philippines. In August 2019, USAID ReachHealth, a five-year family planning project based in the Philippines, set out to help reduce teenage pregnancy nationwide. ReachHealth used a Human-Centered Design (HCD) research framework to hear new voices and co-create solutions. The insights from the HCD process led to co-designing the Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) - Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH) Convergence, an intersectoral approach that seeks to harmonize strategies and implement collaborative activities to holistically support teens in the home, school, community, and health facility. It is the collective agenda of Department of Health (DOH), Commission on Population and Development (POPCOM), Department of Education (DepEd), Local Government Units (LGUs), youth-serving organizations, and local adolescent groups. The multisectoral CSE-ARH convergence recognizes that there are several social determinants of teenage pregnancy and tackles this on multiple levels – from helping teenagers themselves access accurate, age-appropriate ARH information, to building the capacity of parents to communicate with their teenagers about love, sex, and relationships, to establishing referral linkages between schools and adolescent-friendly health facilities. Facilitating this intersectoral collaboration for collective action is not easy. Yet, it is about time we stopped working and thinking in silos. Stakeholders need to harness collective action towards improving teenage pregnancy, and start including adolescents in co-designing interventions and seeing them as holistic individuals with interconnected needs. Progress will be difficult and slow, but its impact on overall adolescent health will be worth it.
Use of Impactful Stories to Address and Assess Provider Bias: Lessons from the Beyond Bias Project
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Lydia Murithi, Pathfinder International
Co-authors :
Theo Gibbs, YLabs
Rebecca Hope , Y-Labs
Upendo Laizer, Pathfinder International
Bagnomboe Bakiono, Pathfinder International
Muhammad Sharjeel
Addressing provider behavior and drivers of provider biases towards youth clients in contraceptive service delivery – either due to age, marital status, parity, social economic background or education status/level – calls for a deeper contextual understanding of social cultural norms that govern patient-doctor interactions as well as a slew of other prevailing structural factors. Lessons from the Beyond Bias project provide compelling insights about the limitation of current approaches used to address provider bias and measure client experience of bias.A rigorous multi-disciplinary approach that combined adolescents and youth sexual and reproductive health (AYSRH) evidence and best practices with behavioral economics and market research methodologies including human centered design (HCD) and segmentation analysis unveiled the intricacies of provider bias and informed the development of a novel behavior change strategy. The model incorporates solutions that employ the power of storytelling to illuminate experiences of clients and the struggles of providers in serving youth clients. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was used to evaluate the model. Findings show the model had significant improvements in provider attitudes/beliefs, counseling quality, and client experiences. However, no changes were observed in method dispensation i.e., method of choice received by clients, begging the question: Does comprehensive counseling lead to a change in method of choice? OR Is method mix a good indicator of informed choice? Future evaluation efforts to assess the effectiveness of the Beyond Bias model or other work on provider behavior should consider use of stories/vignettes to explore these important questions.  
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Karam 2
Communities Get Their Say: Innovations in HCD & Co-design
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Immunization | Non-Communicable Diseases | Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
Speakers
Arshmeen Baveja
Brittany Thurston, ThinkPlace
Nicole Danfakha, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Gamariel Simpungwe
Swetha Srinath, VillageReach
Rishabh Vasu
Timoteo Chaluco
Sean Wilson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Douglas Nsibambi, FHI360
Heather Chotvacs, FHI360
Moderators
Abolade Oladejo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Leading from Behind: Letting Local Solutions Lead the Way to Increase Demand for and Uptake of Family Planning Services in Karamoja, Uganda
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Douglas Nsibambi, FHI360
Heather Chotvacs, FHI360
Co-authors :
Ronnie Aisu , Marie Stopes Uganda
Peter Ddungu , Marie Stopes International
Ritah Tweheyo, Marie Stopes Uganda
In hard-to-reach areas where previous investments in SBC have yielded limited results, engaging the community in identifying, co-designing, and co-delivering local solutions is critical. All too often, we, as SBC implementers, lead with preconceived notions of what interventions are needed and then adapt packaged interventions to work in a local context, instead of going into a community and truly co-designing interventions with the community they will serve.In Uganda, large investments have been made to increase demand for and use of family planning (FP) in the Karamoja region, with limited results. In 2019, FCDO/Reducing high fertility rates and Improving Sexual Reproductive health outcomes (RISE) began working in Karamoja to increase demand for FP services in response to its high total fertility rate and single digit contraceptive prevalence rate. Through co-design sessions with women, men, youth, and community leaders, RISE gained deeper insights into how to work in Karamoja and what interventions were needed to successfully increase demand for FP services. These insights revealed key barriers to FP uptake include social and gender norms around men's FP decision-making authority and a lack of culture of FP use, as well as the need to engage elders as community gatekeepers and influencers. This presentation will provide an overview of the process used to co-design and co-deliver successful community mobilization through elders, its impact on increasing FP use in project districts, and how this approach can be used in other contexts.
Reimagining Malaria Treatment Packaging to Improve Adherence Among Gold Miners in Guyana
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Sean Wilson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Joann Simpson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Camille Adams, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Horace Cox, Ministry Of Public Health
Kashana James, Ministry Of Health
Olivia Valz, Ministry Of Health
Jennifer Orkis, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gabrielle Hunter, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
TrishAnn Davis, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Malaria prevalence in Guyana is highest among men and in the hard-to-reach hinterland regions, where mining and logging activities create favorable environments for mosquito breeding and where malaria testing and treatment services are limited. Formative research conducted by Breakthrough ACTION Guyana and the Ministry of Health found that malaria treatment adherence and risk perception are low among miners. Various insights were identified, including negative perceptions of complicated treatment regimens and not knowing that they can eliminate malaria parasites from the body by following the entire treatment regimen.Breakthrough ACTION Guyana convened the Ministry of Health (MOH), PAHO Brazil, USAID, the Guyana Food and Drug Department (FDD), and the Materials Management Unit (MMU) in Guyana to better understand the feasibility of creating new packaging for malaria medication in Guyana. Various low-fidelity prototypes were co-designed and tested with end-users using a human-centered design approach. The final prototype for testing consisted of three water-resistant envelopes visualizing the treatment regimen and diminishing parasites in the body for P. falciparum, P. vivax, and mixed malaria infection with images.Preliminary results from this intervention show that envelopes have successfully simplified complicated treatment regimens, increased awareness that malaria can be cured, and motivated adherence among miners. Multi-sectoral and international collaboration was critical to ensure viable repackaging and bring light to the feasibility and sustainability of this intervention in Guyana prior to full-scale implementation.
Enhancing Best Practice Adoption Through Co-creation of Guidance Resources
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Nicole Danfakha, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Gamariel Simpungwe
Timoteo Chaluco
Brittany Thurston, ThinkPlace
Swetha Srinath, VillageReach
Rishabh Vasu
Co-authors :
Wendy Prosser, JSI
Carmit Keddem
Karan Sagar
Partners in the immunization supply chain ecosystem have created a wealth of guidance for the immunization and immunization supply chain (iSC) community, including Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) managers, supply chain actors, and implementing partners. However, it is unclear if and how these guidance documents are used. If the guidance provided in these documents are not being applied by their intended audiences, it is not clear why or what strategies could be implemented to translate guidance into action.This activity implemented a human-centered design (HCD) approach to analyze insights gathered from consultations with EPI managers and co-create solutions to address the challenges related to developing, sharing, and utilizing global guidance documents. The activity demonstrated the potential for HCD approaches to influence sustained adoption of new behaviors through the participatory design of resources. Next steps are to test new approaches for creating and disseminating guidance resources that improve the adoption of best practices, techniques, and approaches for immunization supply chain management.
AI and HCD: The Dual Key to Improving Handwashing in Public Hospitals
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Arshmeen Baveja
Co-authors :
Niyoshi Shah
Shreya Gupta
Deborah Sitrin
Surendra Sharma
Pooja Sharma
Ritika Khinvasara
Despite being a crucial factor in controlling hospital-acquired infections, the global compliance rate for hand hygiene is low. Direct supervision and feedback can help in behaviour change, but are difficult to sustain in resource-constrained settings. Some studies indicate that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used instead but in countries like India, technology can exacerbate structural disadvantages if it is not deployed with care. We therefore employed human-centred design to explore how AI may be implemented in public health facilities, where hierarchy is rife. A two-part AI-enabled system was installed in seven hospitals. Health workers received live feedback on their hand washes through a display monitor at the basin. This data was anonymised, aggregated, and made available to the management through a dashboard. In our foundational research we found that handwashing, and the uptake of new technologies are affected by individual and organisational factors such as awareness, motivation, and team support to name a few. So the final set of interventions focussed on the AI system and its larger milieu. These interventions were developed through an iterative process with regular inputs from our end users. Through this project, we have learned that communication design; proper onboarding; grievance redressal; and data visualisation go a long way in improving the uptake of any new machine. Automated feedback can also be empowering in facilities where learning is afflicted by fear and embarrassment. But for AI to land well, as it forays into new domains, deep contextualisation is key.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Fes 1a
Media Approaches to Demand Generation for Health Services
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Adewole Adefalu, John Snow Inc. (JSI)
Mwila Mwaba-Kombe, USAID ZAM-Health Prokect
Moderators
S A M Husain, German Development Cooperation (GIZ Bangladesh)
Using new media tools to achieve maximum exposure reinforces the message on HIV prevention services in the wake of COVID -19: The Zambia Ending AIDS Campaign Experience.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Mwila Mwaba-Kombe, USAID ZAM-Health Prokect
Co-authors :
Kalangwa Kalangwa, Ministry Of Health, Zambia
Winfridah Liyowo - Mulenga, Ministry Of Health
Justine Mwiinga, National AIDS Council
Despite significant progress towards reaching HIV epidemic control, Zambia continues to struggle with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world with over 1 million people living with HIV. The COVID-19 pandemic poses a significant threat to the advances made in HIV prevention, given the focus on COVID-19 prevention and increased regulations which has affected the implementation of social and behavior change (SBC) interventions. Media tools and HIV prevention awareness campaigns offer a unique opportunity to continue to curb new infections.The USAID DISCOVER-Health project supported Zambia Ending AIDS campaign was developed as an aggressive and urgent response to get more people, especially young people, to access critical HIV-prevention products and services to stem the spread of HIV. A critical campaign goal was to drive new energy to support HIV awareness and prevention. The campaign utilises a demand-generation strategy informed by findings from a human-centered design (HCD) process. The USAID ZAM-Health project has since taken over national-level support for the campaign. 
Multiple Applications for a Contraceptive Self-Injection Video
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Adewole Adefalu, John Snow Inc. (JSI)
The PATH-JSI DMPA-SC Access Collaborative (AC) project supports multi-country introduction of a next generation contraceptive method, subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC). The uniqueness of this product is imbued in the ability for women to self-administer the injectable product. AC developed an instructional video outlining the steps involved in self-injection (SI). The video was adapted for the Nigerian context to facilitate increased access to SI. Adaptation was led by the MOH, with technical support from a local communications organization and the AC. The locally-appropriate video was translated into three local languages (Hausa, Ibo, and local English) In addition to the English language version, Nigeria developed three local language versions of the video: in Hausa, Ibo and Pidgin English (the street lingo). There has been an overwhelming reception of the video across Nigeria.Over time, use of the video has rapidly transformed from an instructional resource to a tool for generating interest in self-care (SC) and demand for SI. Several organizations have used the video as a social media campaign tool for advocacy and community mobilization around DMPA-SC SI. The multiple successful applications of the video demonstrate how multimedia materials can serve multiple roles as tools for communications and social behavior change.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Fes 1c
Why Can’t We Be Friends? Bridging SBCC, CSR and the Entertainment Industry (SIE)
Format : Blue Skies Presentation
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Entertainment Education
Speakers
Susan Krenn, ThinkPlace Center For Social Change
The entertainment industry is by far one of the most powerful and influential industries in our societies today. It shapes trends, public opinion, debates and action. And while SBCC professionals routinely harness the power of entertainment for catalyzing program impact, rarely is the industry consistently considered a key stakeholder in the development community. This is in part driven by the commercial and entertainment first perspective of the industry. But it also reflects the narrow perspective of the development community about who belongs at the table. Yet, there is every reason for the entertainment industry, the CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) sector and SBCC community to do better at matching up and mashing up. This is especially relevant today as more and more private sector companies, media included, are looking for ways to contribute to addressing the challenges of today's world. The entertainment industry has resources, reach and influence. The SBCC community needs resources, reach and influence to achieve impact. And there are examples, both good and bad, as to how these sectors have played together before. In this Blue Skies season we will explore how SBCC can be more financially and programmatically sustainable in partnership with the entertainment industry. We will: highlight experiences and perspectives across a range of settings and actors engaged in these types of partnerships; discuss the barriers and pitfalls to these partnership models; discuss models and generate action-oriented recommendations on how we can amplify and expand partnerships between SBCC professionals and the entertainment industry. Everyone wins.
Why Can’t We Be Friends? Bridging SBCC, CSR and the Entertainment Industry (SIE)
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Susan Krenn, ThinkPlace Center For Social Change
The entertainment industry is by far one of the most powerful and influential industries in our societies today. It shapes trends, public opinion, debates and action. And while SBCC professionals routinely harness the power of entertainment for catalyzing program impact, rarely is the industry consistently considered a key stakeholder in the development community. This is in part driven by the commercial and entertainment first perspective of the industry. But it also reflects the narrow perspective of the development community about who belongs at the table. Yet, there is every reason for the entertainment industry, the CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) sector and SBCC community to do better at matching up and mashing up. This is especially relevant today as more and more private sector companies, media included, are looking for ways to contribute to addressing the challenges of today's world. The entertainment industry has resources, reach and influence. The SBCC community needs resources, reach and influence to achieve impact. And there are examples, both good and bad, as to how these sectors have played together before. In this Blue Skies season we will explore how SBCC can be more financially and programmatically sustainable in partnership with the entertainment industry. We will: highlight experiences and perspectives across a range of settings and actors engaged in these types of partnerships; discuss the barriers and pitfalls to these partnership models; discuss models and generate action-oriented recommendations on how we can amplify and expand partnerships between SBCC professionals and the entertainment industry. Everyone wins.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Fes 2a
Future of SBCC: Decolonizing the Field
Format : Panel Presentation
Moderators
Susan Goldstein, SAMRC Centre For Health Economics And Decision Science - PRICELESS SA
Session information coming soon!
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs
Multi-Channel Approaches to Combatting COVID-19 in Nigeria: H.A.N.D.S Campaign
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
Speakers
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Oluwagbemisola Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Moderators
Shannon McAfee, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
The Role of Social Media to Develop, Change and Sustain COVID-19 Preventive Behaviours in Nigeria
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Oluwagbemisola Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Co-authors :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Adenike Ayodele, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Chimezie Anueyiagu, Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
Rufus Eshuchi, UNICEF Nigeria
Adeola Olunloyo, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Partnering Celebrities and Influencers in a pandemic – HANDS Campaign
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Oluwagbemisola Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Co-authors :
Adeola Olunloyo, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Yahya Disu, Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
Captain Bubbles - Engaging with children on COVID-19 and Handwashing
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Co-authors :
Yahya Disu, Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
Adeola Olunloyo, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Rufus Eshuchi, UNICEF Nigeria
Chimezie Anueyiagu, Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Karam 3
Connecting the Dots Among SBC Professionals: The Future of Virtual Engagement Among Global Communities of Practice
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Inclusion
Speakers
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Olivia Carlson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Elizabeth Kohlway, Sabin Vaccine Institute
Ashley Riley, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Oluwakemi Akagwu, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tyler Best, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Professional communities are a proven means of fostering knowledge exchange, collaboration, and connections among social and behavior change (SBC) professionals. Online and digital platforms enable such communities to have a global reach, overcoming the barrier that diverse geographic locations may pose to partnership, collaboration, and knowledge sharing. This panel showcases four communities of SBC professionals: 1) the SBC Working Group of the RBM Partnership to End Malaria; 2) Boost Community; 3) SBC for Service Delivery; and 4) Springboard. The panel will include three segments: 1) Overviews and lessons learned from each community's experiences; 2) Small group discussions exploring complex online engagement questions; and 3) Plenary and summary of discussions from each group. To start, each community will provide a high-level overview of its mission and model for engaging members and meeting goals, including lessons learned and successes, emphasizing virtual activities. Next, in small groups, participants will explore challenges related to communities of practice and online engagement, including issues around measuring success, ensuring representative communities, maintaining momentum during and post-COVID, and the challenges of navigating multiple online communities. The panel will demonstrate the value of online and hybrid communities. Participants will also be able to reflect on questions shaping the future of meaningful connection in an increasingly virtual world and a waning pandemic. As the world becomes even more connected, virtual community building will be increasingly recognized as essential to connecting SBC professionals worldwide. 
Improving coordination between siloed partners: The Case for an SBC for Service Delivery Community of Practice
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Olivia Carlson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Tsigue Pleah, Jhpiego
Evidence shows social and behavior change (SBC) approaches improve service delivery-related outcomes along the service delivery continuum. However, coordination between SBC and service delivery efforts required to achieve those outcomes is often insufficient, and there is ongoing skepticism about SBC's effectiveness and role within the service delivery realm. The SBC for service delivery community of practice (CoP) brings together SBC and service delivery practitioners, researchers, and donors to improve coordination between partners and advance global SBC for service delivery efforts. The CoP aims to improve health outcomes by increasing service uptake, enhancing the client-provider interaction, and improving behavioral maintenance.The CoP has successfully created a cohesive community from what have traditionally been two siloed professional groups. The CoP's Shared Agenda has united its members around a common set of priorities and created practical opportunities for collaboration and coordination. Members have jointly created products that advance the evidence around SBC for service delivery and support integration of SBC into service delivery efforts. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, CoP meetings have held virtually instead of in-person in Washington, D.C. Virtual meetings have led to greater global participation, particularly from practitioners in countries of implementation, and more equitable access to skills-building opportunities and resources. However, the shift has led to questions around how to meaningfully engage audiences and the role of localized CoPs vs. global CoPs. In this presentation, we will explore these pressing challenges and the future of virtual engagement with the abatement of COVID-19.  
Addressing SBC Challenges through Sabin's Boost Community of Immunization Professionals
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Elizabeth Kohlway, Sabin Vaccine Institute
Co-authors :
Jenna Groman, Sabin Vaccine Institute
Sabin Vaccine Institute's Boost Community provides opportunities for immunization professionals to connect, learn and lead. This global network represents more than 2,000 immunization professionals across multiple sectors and countries and features resources, workshops, courses and access to peers and experts, empowering individuals to strengthen  skills and grow in their careers. Boost offers diverse engagement and learning opportunities, through its online platform, live virtual offerings and self-paced trainings. These l events, multi-week trainings and intimate learning groups drive connections and peer learning around topics such as SBC. The need for SBCC for immunization activities has been a recurring theme from the Boost community throughout the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and the community is exploring how to apply SBC tools and approaches across immunization initiatives. Boost will share lessons learned related to the use of SBC by its community along with current methods to engage community members and amplify learnings and knowledge.  As the community encompasses a wide audience - including supply chain managers, health care workers and more - Boost can share how SBC is being integrated across the immunization field. Additionally, Boost supports a smaller CoP, the Behavioral Science for Immunization Network, which focuses on how behavioral science interventions can be used and adapted by immunization professionals. Boost will discuss this network (with both global and country-level engagement) as a case example to share how an online CoP can build capacity for SBC specifically within the immunization community and highlight successes and lessons learned through the launch of this network.
Maintaining Momentum of Malaria SBC through a Global Technical Working Group
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Ashley Riley, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Gabrielle Hunter, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mariam Nabukenya, National Malaria Control Program, Ministry Of Health
Jean Brou-Jacques, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
The RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behavior Change (SBC) Working Group is a forum to bring together national malaria control programs, implementing partners, donors, research institutions, private sector, and non-governmental organizations to support the implementation of effective malaria SBC activities, in alignment with the Strategic Framework for Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication 2017-2030 and the Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC) Indicator Reference Guide. One of the core functions of the RBM SBC Working Group is to share best practices and advance the field of malaria SBC while maintaining a collaborative and mutually beneficial relationship between its membership and other RBM structures.The Working Group's success is driven by a strong Secretariat, Steering Committee, Regional/Linguistic Ambassadors program, technical workstreams, and a diverse membership. The SBC Working Group serves as a forum for coordinated action to end malaria by empowering partners at the country level to develop, implement, and evaluate effective malaria SBC activities. The Working Group achieves this through regular engagement (in-person as feasible), including through the online platform Springboard, quarterly webinars that include technical presentations from members, special initiatives for francophone and lusophone members, and via email. By developing technical reference products on SBC best practices through workstreams, the Working Group responds to the expressed needs of the membership, further supporting engagement and the goals of the group.
Creating a “global SBC village”: challenges, opportunities and experiences of Springboard, an online community for SBC professionals
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Tyler Best, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Oluwakemi Akagwu, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Jean Brou-Jacques, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Springboard first launched in 2014 to serve as an online community for social and behavior change (SBC) professionals from across the globe. As of March 2022, Springboard hosts more than 4,000 SBC professionals from over 120 countries. Springboard's objectives are to: 1) advance members' SBC skills; 2) foster knowledge exchange, networking, and learning among SBC professionals; and 3) inspire users. To meet these objectives, Springboard has engaged in various synchronous and asynchronous activities, such as engaging users on a specific topic; spotlighting one community member per month; hosting "biggest user" competitions; hosting in-person and virtual "meetups"; hosting live written discussions; hosting asynchronous written Q&A sessions; developing and posting "interviews with experts"; and hosting live webinar events on Zoom. Springboard has many lessons learned to share. First, online communities cannot remain static. As quickly as people's preferences shift in the "real world", they also shift in concern to their online platform preferences. Springboard has made major changes in its strategy and delivery of live discussions to meet the needs of members. Springboard has also made a concerted effort to reach Francophone members, as  well as put an emphasis on spotlighting a geographically diverse range of SBC professionals within discussions and live events.Springboard has years of experience to offer the panel grappling with difficult strategy questions. For example, how does an online community measure success when the metrics that are offered on the platform's backend differ from more intangible benefits that are provided to members?
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Karam 4
Moving beyond Small Group Reflection: Norms Shifting Happens Everywhere!
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Gender | Research
Speakers
William Evans, The George Washington University School Of Public Health
Clara Alemann, Equimundo
Anna Page, Rutgers University
Shaon Lahiri, University Of Pennsylvania
Rebecka Lundgren, University Of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
Moderators
Rebecka Lundgren, University Of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
Social norms play an important role in many health and development outcomes and are often a focus of social and behavioral change and communication (SBCC) programs. Over the last five years, over 900 individuals from more than 150 organizations have joined together in a global network of five Learning Collaboratives to Advance Research and Practice on Normative Change (LC) to advance collective knowledge of social norms; what they are, how to measure them, how they influence behavior, and how to implement and scale interventions to address them. LC members have identified an over-emphasis on community-based, small-group approaches to shift social norms and called for action to address this gap. This panel, organized by the LC, will bring together members to discuss approaches to norms shifting that go beyond small group reflection and have the potential to achieve change at a scale that could feasibly reach a tipping point of norms change. These approaches range from the use of social marketing to shift norms, to translating social norms evidence into campaigns to achieve macro-level norm change, and institutionalizing gender-transformative approaches by integration into government policies and structures. There will also be a presentation on a systematic review and meta-analysis of social norms intervention studies aimed at shifting tobacco use.The panelists will address the ongoing debate over recent emphasis on social norms-focused interventions, how they fit into the SBCC field and whether this focus provides undue emphasis on community mobilization and small group reflection.
Social Norms Change and Tobacco Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Interventions
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Shaon Lahiri, University Of Pennsylvania
Tobacco use kills over eight million individuals annually, and results in substantial economic and human capital loss across nations. While effective policy solutions to tobacco control exist, these approaches are less effective at promoting cessation among heavy smokers and smokers living in weaker tobacco control policy environments. Thus, effective demand-side tobacco control approaches such as shifting social norms around tobacco use are needed. However, the scholarship on the conceptualization, measurement, and intervention applications of social norms is diverse and occasionally conflicting. This study synthesizes this vast terrain by focusing on the effectiveness, measurement, modality, and underlying mechanisms of NSIs around and actual tobacco use.A systematic review and meta-analysis of social norms intervention studies aimed at shifting tobacco use was conducted. Social norms change interventions had a small but significant effect on both tobacco and social norms outcomes (g = 0.229, SE = 0.04, p<.001 and g = 0.282, SE=0.101, p=0.011). The studies were characterized by an extremely high level of heterogeneity, explained to some degree by a priori specified covariates. Resistance skills training emerged as a social norms change mechanism not previously described as such in the literature. Descriptive norms were the most common type of measured social norm, followed by injunctive norms.Social norms change interventions are an effective approach to changing normative perceptions of tobacco use and actual tobacco use. Future research and programs should adopt a consistent approach to reporting and implementing these mechanisms to shift tobacco use, as well as other modifiable health risk behaviors.
Learning from scaling-up a gender-transformative couples’ intervention to reduce IPV and promote gender equality in Bolivia, Lebanon and Rwanda
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Giovanna Lauro, Promundo
Co-authors :
Clara Alemann, Equimundo
Institutionalizing gender-transformative approaches by integrating them into governments' policies and structure has the potential to amplify changes in attitudes, behaviors and norms at a large scale in sustainable, cost-effective ways. However, despite growing attention to the importance of scaling up projects, evidence around how to do so while maintaining effectiveness, quality and fidelity is still scarce. To address this gap, PromundoUS will share nearly five years of lessons learned supporting the institutionalization of Program P, a gender-transformative parent training to engage men as positive, nonviolent and equitable fathers and couples implemented in over 15 countries and scaled up to different extents in three. In Rwanda, PromundoUS and the Rwanda Men's Resource Centre are collaborating with the Ministry of Health to scale this approach via the health system by engaging community health workers. In Bolivia, it is being institutionalized with Consejo de Salud Rural Andino in El Alto through municipal health and education sectors. In Lebanon, Promundo and ABAAD Resource Centre for Gender Equality worked with the Ministry of Social Affairs to lay the foundations for mainstreaming Program P in social development centers throughout the country.Lessons learned from these scaling up efforts provide important insights into the factors that support successful institutionalization and will help understand if one program model can effectively be tailored to and scaled up in different contexts. Results from these initiatives can help organizations and policy makers understand better how to bring change through scaling gender-transformative prevention programming via government institutions and structures.
Experiences of using findings on social norms to inform public support strategies
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Anna Page, Rutgers University
Harmful social norms are a key barrier to achieving gender justice and positive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) outcomes. Social norms are deeply held, shared beliefs about what are considered normal, acceptable and appropriate ways of thinking and behaving that often drive behaviour. The Right Here Right Now (RHRN) programme includes a focus on macro-level social norm change, aiming to build public support as a core component of creating an enabling environment for young people's SRHR. Public support initiatives are accompanied by information and education for young people, policy advocacy, and strengthening civil society, in a multi-component approach.The presentation draws on experiences in Tunisia and Nepal, where RHRN partners are employing participatory community-based methods to explore norms in relation to youth SRHR. In these contexts, understanding social norms is seen as increasingly important in light of growing conservatism limiting efforts to promote youth SRHR. Taking an action research approach, Rutgers is working with partners in both countries to document how norms assessments findings can be used to develop targeted campaigns that identify and target 'low hanging fruits' aiming to achieve social norm shifts, as well as informing other aspects of the multi-component approach. Through reflection meetings learning is gathered on challenges and recommendations for the process of using social norms findings to inform public support campaign. Emerging data will also be available on the impact of the campaigns, gathered using a social listening methodology.
Social marketing as a strategy to change social norms: Evidence and case studies from LMIC
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
William Evans, The George Washington University School Of Public Health
Social norms are a form of social influence predicated on the idea that human beings' fundamental need to belong in society causes individuals to hold attitudes and beliefs, and engage in behaviors, that are similar to referent others. Social marketing is the application of "marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good".This presentation aims to connect the dots between social marketing and social norms based on three evidence-based case studies illustrating how social marketing can change norms. First, in Rwanda, an existing branded program called Ni Nyampinga (NN) designed to empower and promote agency in girls was adapted using social marketing to build positive social norms for HPV vaccination. Second, in Sudan, a social marketing program called Saleema was used to change social norms about female genital mutilation (FGM). Third, in Bangladesh, Kenya and Nigeria, modern cookstoves were promoted using social marketing campaigns.In Rwanda, we found a clear preference and HPV knowledge effects for the branded NN story telling messages compared to methods that did not use social marketing. In Sudan, results showed a positive effect of increased anti-FGM social norms as a function of exposure to the Saleema campaign. Finally, in Bangladesh, Kenya, and Nigeria, results showed improved norms about purchase and use of modern cookstoves as a function of exposure to the social marketing campaigns. This shows that utilizing social marketing approaches to promote and create role models that promote positive norms helps to shift norms.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Karam 5
Evaluación e Impacto de las Telenovelas Mexicanas con Contenidos de Diversidad Sexual
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Entertainment Education | Gender | Inclusion | Research
Speakers
Marilú Rojas, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales
Luis Terán, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales
Heriberto Lopez-Romo, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales, SC
Patricia Renteria, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales, SC
En el imaginario colectivo existe la percepción de que la televisión mexicana ha promovido una imagen distorsionada de la diversidad sexual. Sin embargo, son pocos los estudios que profundizaron el abordaje de esta temática en las telenovelas. El objetivo principal de esta investigación es analizar los factores que han determinado la inclusión de estos temas, la manera como se han incorporado contenidos o personajes de diversidad sexual en las telenovelas mexicanas y los impactos en la audiencia que han generado cambios sociales y familiares.Analizamos 78 telenovelas transmitidas de 1960 a 2022 en México en las que trataron el tema o incluyeron algún personaje de diversidad sexual. La investigación se desarrolla a partir del estudio de tres perspectivas: la mirada de los creadores y creadoras de las telenovelas; el tratamiento de la diversidad sexual en los contenidos; y, el impacto en la audiencia expuesta a las telenovelas con contenidos de diversidad.Los resultados revelan que cuando los creadores y creadoras de contenidos incluyen temáticas o personajes de la comunidad LGBT+ de una manera real, respetuosa, digna y alejada de estereotipos y farsas, se generan tanto aprendizajes como cambios de actitud y comportamiento en la audiencia expuesta como empatía , aceptación, respeto y aprecio por todo tipo de diversidades. Esta investigación representa una aproximación original para el conocimiento de los factores que influyen en el abordaje e impacto de los contenidos de diversidad sexual en el comportamiento social, familiar e individual para la construcción de una sociedad más justa, equitativa e incluyente.
Impacto en la audiencia de telenovelas mexicanas con contenidos de diversidad sexual
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Marilú Rojas, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales
Tratamiento de temáticas de diversidad sexual en las telenovelas mexicanas
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Heriberto Lopez-Romo, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales, SC
Co-authors :
Luis Terán, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales
En general, se piensa que la representación de personajes LGBT+ o de la temática de diversidad en las telenovelas es nuevo; esto se debe principalmente al incremento del número de telenovelas que incluyen la temática desde 2000. No obstante, se puede identificar este tipo de contenidos desde 1960. El abordaje ha cambiado, pasó de plantearse de una manera conceptual y sutil hasta ser reconocida, tratada con respeto y a estar integrada a las historias centrales, con personajes abanderados como parte de la comunidad LGBT+.Esta presentación tiene como propósito realizar un análisis del contenido y el tratamiento narrativo y dramático, así como de la representación de las telenovelas que han incluido temáticas o personajes de diversidad sexual. Este estudio aborda 78 melodramas con títulos como: La mujer dorada (1960), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1962), El Retrato de Dorian Gray (1969), Caminemos (1980), Gabriel y Gabriela (1982), Tal como somos (1987), El vuelo del águila (1994), Tres Mujeres (1999), La vida en el espejo ( 1999), La fea más bella (2006), Las tontas no van al cielo (2008), Las aparicio (2010), Por ella soy Eva (2012), Qué pobres tan ricos (2013), Papá a toda madre (2017), Cuna de lobos (2019), entre muchas otras. 
La diversidad sexual desde la mirada de creadores y creadoras de telenovelas mexicanas
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Patricia Renteria, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales, SC
Se piensa que en las telenovelas se promueve una imagen distorsionada de la diversidad sexual. Sin embargo, los resultados de nuestra investigación que muestran la perspectiva de los creadores y creadoras, el análisis de los contenidos y el impacto en la audiencia muestran lo contrario. En esta presentación revelamos los resultados obtenidos a partir de 15 entrevistas a profundidad realizadas a productores y productoras, directores y directoras, escritores y escritoras, así como a un actor. A partir de estas entrevistas identificamos un perfil, modelo de creación y visión de creadoras y creadores acerca de la comunidad LGBTI+, lo que resulta en la incorporación de temáticas en los melodramas televisivos.
Aspectos generales de la investigación de las telenovelas con temáticas de diversidad sexual
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Heriberto Lopez-Romo, El Instituto De Investigaciones Sociales, SC
La influencia de los contenidos televisivos en la generación de cambios sociales no es novedad, la primicia es la evolución de la manera en que las telenovelas mexicanas han tocado el tema de diversidad y los impactos que ha generado en la audiencia. Primero, la temática había sido limitada y la trataban una forma tangencial; desde hace dos décadas se ha transformado y ha incrementado el número de producciones que incluyen este tipo de contenidos. Esta presentación tiene como objetivo indicar de manera general los objetivos, metodología y resultados de la investigación realizada. Ésta concluye que la inclusión de temáticas o personajes de diversidad sexual en los melodramas realizados de una manera real, respetuosa, digna, no burlona, ni estereotipada provoca impactos positivos en la audiencia. Esto se aprecia en el nivel de compromiso que tienen los televidentes con la historia, incluso cuando ésta no es la central. Asimismo, se refleja en los cambios de actitudes y apertura declarados por los televidentes, los cuales incluyen empatía, aceptación, respeto, aprecio y agradecimiento por los mensajes e información.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Reda 1
Just Talk About It: The Importance of Interpersonal Communication
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Entertainment Education | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Emily Katarikawe
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Michael Bride, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Moderators
Raissa VANIAN, UNICEF Niger
Risk Perceptions and Prevention Behaviors for Rabies in Bombali, Sierra Leone: Informing Risk Communication Strategies
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Michael Bride, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
'Kuor Kumoji, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tina Dickenson, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Stephanie Clayton, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Anna Helland, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Fatmata Bockarie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
James Fofanah, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tyler Best, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gratiano Nyuma, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Andrea Anschel-Brown, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Rabies was identified as the second most important priority zoonotic disease (PZD) in Sierra Leone, but little is known about community-level drivers of rabies transmission. These studies used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data from residents and key stakeholders in Bombali district of Sierra Leone, in June-July 2018. Focus group discussions stratified by age and gender were conducted among a cross-section of the community and key stakeholders, with questionnaires administered to randomly selected community members. The overall aims of these studies were to document and understand perceptions, knowledge, and behaviors associated with rabies risk and prevention. Perceptions of risk of rabies were mixed and were linked to higher awareness of, and experiences with, the disease. While awareness of rabies was generally high, high-risk perceptions and awareness did not translate to a decrease in high-risk interactions. Indeed, livelihood such as animal husbandry increased risky behaviors and activities among many community members and was prioritized over personal health and rabies exposure. Community members who consistently engage in high-risk activities may benefit from targeted health messages that address causes and transmission pathways for rabies, as well as ways to limit personal risk during income generation. Continuous interpersonal and community dialogue approaches and use of community monitors may also help address conflicts between risk perception and risk behavior. These approaches afford individuals opportunities to share experiences and discuss the issues that influence their current perceptions and behaviors.
Interpersonal Communication Increases Iron folic acid use: Lessons from the Reduction in Anemia through Normative Innovations (RANI) Project in Odisha, India
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Co-authors :
Rohini Ganjoo, The George Washington University
Jeffrey Bingenheimer, The George Washington University
Erica Sedlander, University Of California, San Francisco
Yichen Jin
Sameera Talegawkar, The George Washington University
Ichhya Pant
Hagere Yilma, Boston University
Aika Aiuc, The George Washington University
Bikash Kumar Panda, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
More than half of women of reproductive age in India are anemic. Anemia causes fatigue and cognitive impairment, affecting a woman's ability to contribute to the labor force and her overall quality of life. Reducing anemia can be achieved by regularly taking iron-folic acid (IFA) supplements. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial to promote IFA consumption among women of reproductive age since prior research indicates the positive effects of interpersonal communication on changing behavior. Grounded by the theory of normative social behavior, the goal of the Reduction in Anemia through Normative Innovations (RANI) Project was to increase the use of IFA through participatory interactions and interpersonal communication regarding anemia and IFA consumption. The project distinguishes between the ritualistic function emphasizing the role communication plays in bringing people together and the instrumental function articulating the impact that communication has on various health outcomes. We hypothesize that by bringing people together, interventions can stimulate ritualistic behaviors among the participants as they discuss general issues, whereas the instrumental function may be kindled when the intervention brings people together who then discuss their exposure to anemia-specific discussions. The intervention included three components-communication videos, education modules delivered by local community facilitators through activities and games, and monthly hemoglobin testing sessions. Data was collected at baseline, six months later at midline, and twenty months later at end-line. Results highlight the role of interpersonal communication in mediating IFA use. Even during social distancing, enhancing strategic interpersonal communication can result in increased IFA use.
Mobilizing young Men to Lead in Promotion of Family Planning and Contraception Uptake. The Men on a Mission (Mon-Ami) Campaign
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Emily Katarikawe
Co-authors :
Alvin Muhwezi, Innovation Program For Community Transformation (InPACT)
Diana Kabahuma, Innovation Program For Community Transformation (InPACT)
Jackson Nuwamanya, Innovation Program For Community Transformation (InPACT)
In Uganda, adolescent pregnancy rate is at 25% among teenage girls but the prevalence of adolescent fathers is not known and their challenges are hardly addressed and needs are unmet. There is still insufficient research and policy attention paid to the psychological experiences of adolescent men in Uganda. Thus adolescent boys who unexpectedly become fathers are at a loss on how to deal with the psychosocial, emotional, and economic challenges, stigma and hostility, and in many instance have no place to go to for redress. Moreover, young boys and men are rarely brought together to discuss contraception, a practice that affirms that contraception and family planning is a female issue. In 2018 Innovation Program for Community Transformation (InPact) conducted a rapid survey in Kanungu district that led to the development of an evidence based SBC campaign focused on Adolescent Boys and Young men (ABYM) premised on a community level interpersonal approach to promote contraception among. ABYM, also conducted door to door promotion and dispensing of short term methods to female peers. Over 213 community dialogues were held, 3,848 women of reproductive age reached, 898 new users of FP served, and an estimated 12,000 people reached with FP messages.
Using Linguistic Analysis for Early Identification and Response to Crisis Messages on an SMS Platform
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Shujaaz is the largest youth media brand in East Africa reaching, entertaining, educating, and empowering over 9 million young people aged 15-24 in Kenya and Tanzania.Shujaaz uses its SMS platform as part of the feedback loop to enable its 1.2 million fans to share their opinions on the media content, as well as their own stories related to the themes discussed in the analogue and digital media. Fans, who send Shujaaz 200+ SMS messages a day, expect more than an opportunity to evaluate the media. Periodic manual analysis of SMS and follow-up engagements with selected fans revealed that thousands of young people are looking for support at the time of crisis, including referrals to trusted, youth-friendly clinics for advice andconsultation on menstruation, contraception, and pregnancies. Inability to identify and address such cries-for-help results in fans' disappointment in Shujaaz, but most importantly leads to SRH, general, and mental health consequences that undermine youth wellbeing. In 2018-2021, Shujaaz worked with Rutgers on a SRH crisis campaign. Together, they analyzed SMS conversations pertaining to the campaign to identify words, word combinations, and verbal expressions young people employ to define an SRH crisis like an unintended pregnancy. The findings are now used in an on-going effort by Shujaaz to automatically identify and flag incoming crises SMS messages to enable the trained in-house team to reach out to individuals, and refer them to a relevant partner(s) in the Shujaaz network of medical and youth-friendly counseling professionals.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Reda 2
Communication Begins at Home: Evidence for Family-Based Strategies
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Gender | Maternal Health | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Daudi Ochieng, Malaria Consortium
Abhishek Singh, UNICEF
CHANDAN KUMAR
Deepak Soni, Government Of Chhattisgarh
Sujata Singh, CARE
Niki Trivedi, Johns Hopkins University
Moderators
L. Arlette Saavedra Romero, Secretaria De Salud
Investigating the Relationship Between Social Support and Maternal Mental Health and Well-Being in Bangladesh: Implications for Social and Behavior Change Programming
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Niki Trivedi, Johns Hopkins University
Co-authors :
Carmen Cronin, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Timothy Werwie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nandita Kapadia Kundu, Vegetarian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Amanuel Gidebo, World Vision
Marie Bettings, World Vision
Zoé Hendrickson, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Maternal depression is common among women globally. Social support protects against stress, anxiety, and depression during pregnancy, yet less is known about the social, gender, and community-level factors associated with maternal mental health and well-being in Bangladesh. This study examined the relationship between social support received during pregnancy and maternal mental health among women in three sites in Bangladesh. A community-based sample of 927 married women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who had a child under two years participated in a cross-sectional survey administered in 2020. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models examined the association between sources of social support and women's perceived happiness and worry during their most recent pregnancy. Multivariate models adjusted for social, gender, and community-level factors including age, education, workload, couple communication, household decision-making, gender equitable norms, and compassion, stress, and gender-based violence in the community. Results from multivariate models showed that perceived social support from one's spouse or mother-in-law was positively associated with happiness and negatively associated with worry during pregnancy. Support from one's children was negatively associated with happiness and positively associated with worry during pregnancy. Couple communication, more compassion in households in the community, and more equitable gender norms were positively associated with happiness and negatively associated with worry during pregnancy. Findings suggest the need for social and behavior change (SBC) approaches to address social support, particularly from spouses and mothers-in-law, and household dynamics in maternal mental health interventions in Bangladesh.
Engaging Fathers to Transform Gender Norms and Improve Nutrition Practices: Experiences from the Suaahara II Good Nutrition Program in Nepal
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Sujata Singh, CARE
Co-authors :
Pooja Pandey, Helen Keller International
Kristine Garn
Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Helen Keller International
Suaahara II (2016-2023), a USAID-funded multi-sectoral program in Nepal aims to improve maternal and child nutrition behaviors, transitioning from the initial mother/child dyad focus to a family approach. Program interventions explicitly aim to increase awareness among all family members, particularly fathers and household decision-influencers, to challenge existing social norms that influence maternal and child health and nutrition practices. Suaahara II implemented gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) specific interventions, such as GESI champions and Fathers' Dialogue Groups, complemented by social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions tailored to challenge harmful practices, portray positive norms, and correct misperceptions. Program annual survey data from 2017 to 2019 found engaging fathers significantly contributed to improving male household head's knowledge on good nutrition practices and key health and nutrition indicators. Exposing male household heads to Suaahara II interventions tripled the odds of children consuming a minimum acceptable diet and of appropriate feeding for sick children.
Baapis: the Champions of Change
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Abhishek Singh, UNICEF
Co-authors :
CHANDAN KUMAR
Deepak Soni, Government Of Chhattisgarh
Grandma's are the new change agents in Dantewada, ChhattisgarhBaapi Na Uwaat (Tips from Grandmother) program was launched in the Dantewada district, access compromised, a Naxal affected area of Chhattisgarh. Traditionally, these areas have had cultural malpractices among women during pregnancy and childbirth. These malpractices include nutrition taboo, delivering their babies at home, avoiding colostrums, washing the baby and mother 24 hr after delivery in cold water, and keeping the mother and child in a small room away from the warmth of the main household. The district administration, with the support of UNICEF, designed and launched the initiative in December 2020. The program aims to transform Elderly women (Behavioural resistant) into catalyst and make the gateway of information. The key feature of the program is; 1) the use of communication in local dialect 2) Augmenting the potency of faith pivots like devgudi, and cultural gathering platforms such as madai to trigger behavior change. These elderly women from the community were identified based on voluntary participation and were trained from all the 239 villages of the district to act as the 'baapi' for their village. Baapis and village volunteers, (satrangi nayak nayakiya) were oriented on IPC skills, key behaviours, & practices aligned with nutrition, education, ANC, Anemia, Hygiene, culture, and heritage. Over the year, baapis have developed a close bond with these families, connect with people on their good-will, without the temptation of any monetary benefit. 
The ‘Zooming-In’ Approach to Improve Malaria-Related Indicators: Lessons Learned from Uganda
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Daudi Ochieng, Malaria Consortium
Co-authors :
Daudi Ochieng, Malaria Consortium
Working closely with the Ministry of Health, the USAID's Malaria Action Program for Districts (MAPD) program linked health facility data with households who did not practice malaria prevention behaviors and contributed to high test positivity rates (TPRs) in Hoima, Masaka and Rwenzori and West Nile in Uganda, and targeted men and women with evidence-based SBC strategies to understand and to change their behaviours. Key influencers who displayed uncommon, but positive behaviors, and who could influence others were identified and trained to visit households in their communities to promote these behaviors. During the home visits the key influencers identified risks and challenges that households and individuals experienced in accessing malaria services. Using this information, they worked with families to draw up household-specific action plans, provide information on the chosen behaviors and subsequently carried out follow-up visits over a minimum of three months to ensure that plans were being implemented. They were also hosted on radio talk shows to motivate a wider audience.The 'zooming-in' approach had a positive impact on the target population's behavior, encouraging increased mosquito net use, health-seeking behaviors and men's involvement in household health. We found that, to sustain positive behaviors and ensure these become the norm, continued follow-up visits were important.As the heads of households, men tend to have greater influence over their families' healthcare access and decision-making. Using communication strategies that target men's involvement tend, therefore, to be effective in encouraging behavior change among the rest of the household.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Reda 4
Empowering Entertainment: Ensuring No One is Left Behind
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Entertainment Education | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Sarah Akintubuwa, USAID YPE4AH/DAI Nigeria
Chiara Camozzi, CISP
Malick Dione, International Food Policy Research Institute (Dakar)
Brian Pedersen, FHI360
Moderators
Saif Ul Hadi, IAVI
Sitetereki (I am Unshakeable): Impact of Tanzania’s Youth-Led Integrated SBC Platform on Key Sexual and Reproductive Health Outcomes
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Brian Pedersen, FHI360
Co-authors :
Prisca Rwezahura, FHI360
Caroline Mshanga
Hassan Chaula, FHI360
Victor Mushi, FHI360
Mark Lwakatare, FHI360
Waziri Nyoni, FHI360
LULU MSANGI, USAID/Tanzania
A Community Edutainment Intervention for Gender-Based Violence, Sexual and Reproductive Health, and Maternal and Child Health in Rural Senegal: A Qualitative Process Evaluation
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Malick Dione, International Food Policy Research Institute (Dakar)
There is limited evidence on the underlying processes and barriers to effective delivery of edutainment, especially in rural areas. This process evaluation of a community-based edutainment intervention assesses intervention adaptation, implementation fidelity, participants' responsiveness or engagement, and series appropriateness. The intervention is a popular Senegalese TV series, designed to improve knowledge, attitudes, and practices on harmful practices and screened through biweekly film clubs and included post-screening discussions and thematic workshops, meant to reinforce messages and change social norms. The intervention targeted adolescent girls and young women aged 14 to 34. Data collection was carried out in 2020 in 14 villages using: semi-structured interviews with implementers (n=3), village chiefs (n=8), married women (n=9), adolescent girls (n=8), and men (n=8); focus groups (n=17); observations of screening sessions (n=6). Data were analyzed using thematic and content analysis. Results highlight that adaptation of the intervention helped reach target populations and improved participant attendance, but might have compromised fidelity to original design, as post screening discussions and thematic workshops were shortened and modified for rural delivery. The screenings coverage and frequency were adequate; however, their duration was shortened due to COVID-19. Participant responsiveness was excellent, as was the series appropriateness for most topics, including gender-based violence. Sexual and reproductive health remains a sensitive topic, especially when the film clubs included non-peers, such as slightly older women. This study showed that using film clubs to deliver sensitive edutainment content in rural areas is feasible and has potential for scale-up.
Arts for Social Change Methodologies as a Tool for SBCC Among Marginalized Groups in Somalia
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Chiara Camozzi, CISP
CISP has been using "Arts for social change methodologies" in Somalia since 2014, working with vulnerable and marginalized groups, including women and youth, internally displaced people and minority clans. The approach leverages on the power of arts and communication to promote more inclusive and peaceful communities by challenging barriers related to cultural and social norms and by fostering sense of agency and positive change at individual and community level. CISP has experimented different types of arts methodologies (Theatre of the Oppressed, Body mapping, Photovoice, Storytelling, Public Arts) that have been used as an innovative medium to explore topics such as identity, inclusion, empowerment, and gender equality. Findings from the quantitative and qualitative monitoring and evaluation activities together with an impact assessment conducted by CISP in 2019-2020, include the following. The dissemination of artistic products and messages through exhibitions and events in public spaces promoted dialogue, civic engagement, participation and inclusion of participants in their communities. The project provided opportunities for exploring coexistence amongst diversities by including different groups in participatory arts workshops and events which allowed participants to learn and practice meaningful dialogue, and develop self-confidence, trust and sense of agency. Both participation in art production and being an audience of art exhibitions and events increased the sense of agency, belonging, self-esteem and self-awareness of people, as well as developed critical and problem-solving skills. For example, 59-62% of participants enhanced their level of adherence to non-discrimination and gender equality values. 
The Magical Effects of Engaging Youth in Challenging Norms Around Sexual Health and Family Planning
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Sarah Akintubuwa, USAID YPE4AH/DAI Nigeria
Co-authors :
Boladale Akin-Kolapo, USAID YPE4AH, DAI Nigeria
Nigeria has one of the fastest growing populations in the world with some of the highest levels of teen pregnancy. Nearly one third of adolescents face an unintended pregnancy and some one in five children are born to a teen parent. Nigerian prevailing norms toward sexual health and education are out of touch with the sexual lives of young people. In culturally conservative or traditional areas, providing youth access to contraception is believed to encourage promiscuity. As a result, many adolescents receive no sexual healthcare or family planning services or seek it in secret, visiting health facilities that will guarantee anonymity. These are often private and unregulated clinics, where youth need to pay for services, subsequently making them less likely to use contraception. Risky sexual behaviours, lack of sexual health awareness and poor access to sexual health services are contributing to Nigeria's high rates of unintended teen pregnancy.USAID's Youth-Powered Ecosystem to Advance Urban Adolescent Health aims to empower urban youth living in slums and help them reach their full potential by providing them access to life skills, contraception, and employment opportunities. The project seeks to elevate marginalised youth voices by providing a platform for them to advocate for themselves and by incorporating these their ideas and aspirations into the project's design and implementation through a youth advisory committee (YAC). Youth-led SBCC programming is essential for transforming attitudes and practices around contraception and tackling cultural stigmas around sexual health and education to support youth to reach their full potential. 
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Reda 5
She Said, He Said: Improving Lives Through Couples Communication
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Research
Speakers
Paul Hutchinson, Tulane University
Bolanle Olapeju, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences
Paul Odeke, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Anastasia Gage, Tulane University School Of Public Health And Tropical Medicine
Victoria Marijani, Save The Children
Joanita Aigi Muruve, Save The Children
Moderators
Sitora Shokamolova, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
An Analysis of Gender Roles and Family Dynamics that Affects Nutrition Outcomes for Pregnant and Lactating Women, Children Under 5 and Adolescents in Tanzanian Households.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Victoria Marijani, Save The Children
Joanita Aigi Muruve, Save The Children
USAID's Lishe Endelevu Activity is a four-year cooperative agreement that aims to intensify and integrate nutrition support and improve the nutritional status of women, children and adolescents in four regions of Tanzania. The Activity conducted a gender analysis to collect information to support the development of a social and behavior change strategy to achieve the Activity's goals. The analysis used qualitative methods to elicit information, perspectives and experiences from pregnant or breastfeeding women, husbands of pregnant or breastfeeding women, adolescent girls, health and agriculture extension officers, community health workers and nutritionists. Qualitative methods included focus group discussions and in-depth interview with a total of 126 participants. The study found that men are reluctant to support their wives due to peer/societal pressure and the risk of being mocked by their male friends as weak. In addition, alcohol abuse and domestic violence surfaced as significant barriers that hinder couple communication, reduce quality time and bonding among couples and other family members, and reduce men's potential to fulfill their roles as the protectors and supporters of their families. Adolescent girls from rural areas find it difficult to communicate with their fathers on their nutrition and reproductive health needs, and instead rely on boyfriends to help them. In contrast, urban girls communicate with their fathers more easily, participate more in household decision making, and are able to offer their parents advice. The design of gender transformative social and behavior change strategies is enhanced by a gender analysis at the outset.
When Perceived Norms and Attitudes Intersect: Momentum's Impact on Postpartum Family Planning Outcomes Among First-Time Mothers Age 15-24 in KInshasa, DRC
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Anastasia Gage, Tulane University School Of Public Health And Tropical Medicine
Co-authors :
Francine Wood, University Of California San Diego, Center For Gender Equity And Health
It has been argued that social norms (i.e., shared rules of acceptable behavior) are powerful drivers of behavior change. Using a quasi-experimental design and intent-to-treat analyses, this study examined how postpartum family-planning (PPFP)-related social norms and attitudes intersected to influence the Momentum project's impact on partner discussion of family planning (FP) in the immediate (0-2 months) postpartum period (PP); obtaining contraceptives in the immediate PP; and modern contraceptive use in the immediate and extended (0-11 months) PP among 1,924 first-time mothers (FTMs) age 15-24. Data were collected in 2018 and 2020 from three intervention and three comparison health zones in Kinshasa. Average treatment effects were estimated to compare Momentum's impact on PPFP when social norms existed simultaneously, independently, or not at all. Findings indicated that impact on two PPFP outcomes was greatest when both normative expectations and descriptive norms were in place. Normative expectations alone appeared to be more important than descriptive norms alone for impact on PPFP. Normative expectations intersected with personal approval of PPFP to impact the probability of obtaining a FP method and using modern contraception in the immediate and extended PPs. Momentum had significant impact on obtaining a FP method and using a modern method within 12 months when descriptive norms and personal approval co-occurred as when personal approval occurred alone. Our results supported social norms theory and emphasized the need for FP programs to simultaneously address PPFP-related normative expectations, descriptive norms, and attitudes.
What Does Your Partner Want? Clarifying Partner Involvement for Family Planning in Uganda
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Bolanle Olapeju, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences
Paul Odeke, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Anna Passaniti
Judith Nalukwago
Pallen Mugabe, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Leonard Bufumbo
Musa Kimbowa, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Fiona Amado, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Emmanuel Kayongo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
While partner involvement is linked with positive health behaviors, a key gap in the literature exists on how this construct should be measured and the specific ways people in Uganda perceive partner involvement in their context. We pushed the boundary and sought to explore partner involvement from a gender equality lens. Our research question was: How do men and women in Uganda want their partners to be involved when it comes to family planning decisions and behaviors? We answered this question using a nationally representative quantitative survey and explored measures of spousal support in the context of family planning in Uganda among 1177 men and women in partnerships and found that the most important consideration for deciding to use family planning in Uganda was "discussing with partners" (85% of men and women each) which was associated with five times the odds of use family planning. Two-thirds (66%) of men and women wanted a high level of involvement from their partner which was associated with twice the odds of using family planning (aOR- 2.4). Specific ways partners could be involved include accompanying them to health services (39%), permitting them to get family planning services (26%) and jointly discussing family planning options (23%). Of note, more females wanted their partner to accompany them (45%) than men (33%) while more males (29%) wanted to jointly discuss options than females (15%).
Measuring Within-Couple Effects of SBC Programming in the Context of Gender Power Differentials: An Analysis of the Albishirin Ku! Program and Family Planning Outcomes in Northwestern Nigeria
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Paul Hutchinson, Tulane University
Co-authors :
Emily Johansson, Tulane University
Elizabeth Omoluabi, CRERD
Akanni Akinyemi, CRERD
Udochisom Anaba, Breakthrough RESEARCH Nigeria
Collins Ozoadibe, Akena Associates
High fertility and low contraceptive use in northwestern Nigeria are largely driven by high-fertility norms, pro-natal cultural and religious beliefs, misconceptions about contraceptive methods, and gender inequalities. From 2018 to 2025, the USAID-funded Breakthrough ACTION social and behavior change (SBC) program, known as Albishirin Ku!, aims to shift the drivers of high fertility through multiple channels including mass, social and digital media, as well as community-level events and home-visits by community volunteers. Breakthrough RESEARCH analyzed household survey data from 1,032 married couples in Kebbi state in northwestern Nigeria collected in late 2021. Questions were asked separately of husbands and wives about norms, attitudes, knowledge, communication, and outcomes related to contraception, permitting an analysis of how exposure to Albishirin Ku! is potentially associated with concordance (and discordance) within couples. The analysis also examined the differential effects of exposure to Albishirin Ku! within couples on modern contraceptive use, both directly and indirectly through effects on FP norms.The study found important but differing effects of exposure for husbands and wives. The influence of husbands' exposure was indirect, affecting the likelihood that wives approved FP use for birth spacing. Exposure for wives was more direct; relative to couples with no exposure, couples in which the wife alone was exposed to Albishirin Ku! were 5.7 percentage points (pp) more likely to use modern contraception while exposure for the husband alone was associated with only 1 pp greater likelihood. Joint exposure was ideal, associated with 7.7 pp increase in contraceptive use.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Aud des Ministres
Digital Counseling for Health Access and Services
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Aicha Ka, Vegetarian, DKT International
Sunitha B J, KHPT
Andrea Novella, Population Services International (PSI)
Moderators
Tomas Jensen, Rain Barrel Communications
Youth Centered and Digitally Driven Chatbot: Co creating an Artificial Intelligence solution for and with youth
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Andrea Novella, Population Services International (PSI)
Co-authors :
Lorena Ivette Villeda Linares, Population Services International (PSI)
Martin Dale, Population Services International (PSI)
 In a region where sexual education is limited due to societal stigma, PSI is leveraging online channels and artificial intelligence to support its efforts in reducing teen pregnancy rates in Latin America and the Caribbean by providing an innovative and data-driven digital approach to increase access to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) information and services for youth 15-24 through the Youth 3.0 program. Supported by multiple data sources, the program has identified the best way to engage young people with SBCC for SRHR: by making it fun.  The program's digitally-driven youth-centered approach to SRHR information provision resulted in 7.1 million unique views or impressions of its online communications campaign and 54,810 online behavior change interventions in youth ages 15-24. The high demand generated, combined with real-time insights into youth´s desire to obtain 24/7 information and immediate response, led to the need of developing an automated solution that could increase impact through an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Chatbot. To respond, PSI launched Ubi: A Chatbot capable of providing online contraceptive counseling and reducing barriers to uptake by providing personalized, confidential, and medically accurate information and referrals to low-cost products and services in a fun, engaging, and easily accessible way.  
Stimulating demand for tele-mental health services and de-stigmatizing counselling: Using IEC material and social media
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Sunitha B J, KHPT
Co-authors :
Vrinda Manocha, Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT)
Maithreyi Ravikumar, Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT)
The increase in mental health burden during the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated new means of reaching populations. Tele-mental health services expanded, however, demand for these services remained low due to the lack of awareness and stigma around mental health. KHPT launched the Sahita mental health Careline, a free-of-cost outbound call service in 2021 with 30 counsellors across three districts of Karnataka, India, to reach out to current and former COVID-19 patients and caregivers. At the outset, counsellors faced some hesitation; many persons did not understand how counselling works, others hesitated to share details, fearing stigma. To overcome these challenges, a set of visual and auditory Information Education and Communication (IEC) material was developed and shared over WhatsApp and IVRS to supplement the scheduled calls made by counsellors.  These were designed to prime persons about the counselling process, in order to create a demand and de-stigmatize mental health, as well as address the challenges faced by specific populations including the elderly, children and adolescents, and caretakers of persons with mental health issues. These highlighted coping strategies such as visualization, breathing exercises and practical steps to express fears and create new routines.  The material, shared over WhatsApp between regular calls, ensured a continuous line of support between the Careline and the patient or caregiver, especially at the height of the pandemic.
Safe access to online abortion services & information
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Presented by :
Aicha Ka, Vegetarian, DKT International
With the advent of digital technology, women are taking a more measured approach to their health and well-being, and the internet is the first place they go in search of self-care. This includes safe abortion information and services. Online websites and resources offer privacy and confidentiality and equip users with the tools and autonomy to manage their health on their terms. Self-managed abortions reinforce a person's sexual and reproductive rights and self-efficacy by allowing them to manage and decide over the entire abortion process. safe2choose.org leverages digital technology to offer online abortion seekers access to safe abortion information and services. The website provides simple, accurate, and non-stigmatizing information on how to use the abortion pill and what to expect during an in-clinic abortion, including a comprehensive FAQ section and easily downloadable abortion protocols. A testimonial section highlights personal and anonymous abortion stories from people across the world.  Launched in 2015, safe2choose also provides direct safe abortion counseling and referral services. With a team of trained female counselors, users can receive one-on-one, private and empathetic abortion self-care guidance and care via a live chat facility on the website or via email. Counseling is available in 10 languages across several time zones. safe2choose also operated a global database of safe abortion care providers globally. In certain cases where a person needs facility-based care, safe2choose can quickly and safely refer them to their closest providers, thus ensuring continuity of care.
02:00PM - 03:15PM
Anfa (Mogador)
Regional Space
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Poster Space
Poster Presentations
Format : Poster Presentations
Speakers
Kathryn Merckel, ACDI/VOCA
Juanita Rodriguez, ThinkPlace
Myrnelle Cinco
Ronald Del Castillo, UN World Food Programme Philippines
Kumbirai Chatora, PSI
Tuzie Edwin, UNICEF
Grace Moshi, Ministry Of Health Tanzania
Billie Puyat Murga, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Habtamu Tamene, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nenden Fathiastuti, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Abdulaziz Ali Oumer, FHI360
Nanna Skau, World Food Programme
Winfrida Mayilla Meshack Mollel, N/A, GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR IMPROVED NUTRITION
Issack Kitururu, Jamii Intergrated Development Initiative
Katherine Dickin, USAID-Advancing Nutrition
Kay Klumpyan, Mercy Corps
Brian Mdawida, The Manoff Group
Amelia Giancarlo, USAID Advancing Nutrition
Kelsey Torres, USAID Advancing Nutrition
Laura Itzkowitz, USAID
Anna Godfrey, BBC Media Action
Ritu Ghosh, Nutrition International
Haydee Lemus, Jhpiego Guatemala
Cody Ragonese, Promundo-US
Clara Alemann, Equimundo
Kathryn Sugg, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Rahin Khandker, Ideas42
Muzib Mehdy, No Any Preference, Bangladesh Nari Progati Sangha (BNPS)
Aschbel Kazadi, Save The Children
Lessons on sustainability learned from a menstrual health programme in Bangladesh
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Muzib Mehdy, No Any Preference, Bangladesh Nari Progati Sangha (BNPS)
Co-authors :
Mahbuba Kumkum, Simavi
Hilda Alberda, Simavi
Shahida Parvin, BNPS
Zobair Hasan, DORP
Surfacing Data-Informed Partnerships in Mainstreaming SBC in the Human Rights Sector in the Philippines
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Myrnelle Cinco
Micheline Rama, The Asia Foundation
Engaging youth in West Africa in a co-design process to steer their nations and people into an era of quality adolescent and reproductive health.
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Juanita Rodriguez, ThinkPlace
frica is home to the youngest population in the world, and it is expanding quickly. By 2055, the continent's population aged 15-24, is expected to more than double.  Yet, "the continent remains stubbornly inhospitable – politically, economically, and socially – to young people" (UNDP). One of the main challenges that Africa will have to face in the 21st century will be to turn its youth explosion into growth and prosperity that includes and benefits everyone.   In this context, poor management of population growth will have serious consequences. To avoid this, African countries will need new strategies in terms of leadership, institutions and policies. And much of that starts with tapping in the potential of the continent's youth.  That's why designers from ThinkPlace US recently brought together 40 amazing young minds from more than 10 countries across West Africa for a Youth Design Challenge. Over 13 hours spread across 4 days in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire youth leaders were assembled together, given a challenge and provided with expert mentors to help them solve it using Human-Centered Design.   As part of the Francophone Social and Behavior Change (SBC) Summit in 2019, the Youth Design Challenge was created to build innovation skills among participants by asking them to design a regional campaign promoting the potential of youth to steer their nations and people into an era of quality adolescent and reproductive health.  
Drivers and barriers to adoption of nutrition-sensitive business models by private sector food system actors in Bangladesh
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kathryn Merckel, ACDI/VOCA
Much of the literature on utilizing social and behavior change (SBC) principles to understand and influence adoption of nutritious diets has focused on individual consumers. However, food choices occur in the context of the food environment, which is directly shaped by food system actors, nearly all of whom are private sector companies.Nutrition-sensitive business models (NSBM) are profit-oriented plans and processes that contribute to improving nutrition broadly, such as through increasing the affordability, accessibility, and desirability of nutritious foods. NSBM offer a unique value proposition to companies while also contributing to the global effort to eliminate malnutrition. However, research on adoption of NSBM-especially through the lens of SBC principles-is scant.This research, conducted as part of the USAID-funded Feed the Future Bangladesh Rice and Diversified Crops (RDC) Activity, seeks to answer the question: what are the main barriers and motivations that drive adoption of innovative NSBM by food system companies? Guided by the Diffusion of Innovation framework, we conducted and analyzed three commodity-specific focus groups with 28 mid-to-large-sized commodity input and purchasing firms. We found significant interest in and results from NSBM investments. Barriers included insufficient skillsets and technical capacity, uncertainty about roles and responsibilities, and concern that the broader political and market environment would inhibit realization of the full benefits of NSBM.This evidence offers SBC and market systems development practitioners actionable insights for encouraging food system companies to adopt NSBM that are profitable and competitive while also contributing to reducing malnutrition.
Are the voices of Filipino teenagers and male adults ignored in food-related decisions in the home?
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Ronald Del Castillo, UN World Food Programme Philippines
Despite teenagers having some control over what they eat and despite male adults having some responsibility in feeding children, the emphasis on maternal influences and behaviors overlooks the opportunities for amplifying the voices of other members in the household. In 2021, WFP Philippines assessed these behaviors from which to co-create targeted messages. Three focus group discussions were held with a total of 15 teens. Among the male adults, such as a spouse or an adult son, 3 focus groups were also held with 14 participants. These 90-minute, in-person groups explored influences on food decisions, perceptions about healthy and unhealthy eating, social norms and taboos, and other food-related thoughts and feelings. Though the teens and male adults were in separate discussion groups, a common theme emerged: their inputs in food-related decisions were small or negligible. They described how the mealtime behaviors, preferred diets, and feeding practices of mothers and other female caregivers were preferred. Teens have some degree of influence over their food habits. When parents and caregivers validate and mirror these choices, teens are more likely to make healthier ones. Paternal male behaviors, too, can drive children's long-term eating habits. If inputs from male adults are put aside in preference for maternal inputs, there is lost opportunity to maximize paternal responsibility and influence as well as father-child bonding. Cultivating the intrapersonal and interpersonal skills of teens and male adults can be a key focus of any communication strategy.
WE ARE OPEN-MINDED BUT NOT LIBERATED: USING HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN TO HEAR TEENAGE VOICES IN THE PHILIPPINES
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Billie Puyat Murga, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Jeffry Lorenzo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Algin Gultia, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Lindsey Leslie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Costing of Mass Media Campaigns for Improving Breastfeeding in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Nigeria and Vietnam
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Abdulaziz Ali Oumer, FHI360
Co-authors :
Tina Sanghvi
Rick Homan, FHI360
Thomas Forissier, FHO 360
Roger Mathisen, FHI Solutions
Exploring barriers for uptake and adherence to Iron and Folic Acid supplementation in Ethiopia to inform a Human Centered Design Process
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Habtamu Tamene, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tewabech Tesfalegn, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Yihunie Lakew, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Biruk Melaku Ayalew, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nandita Kapadia Kundu, Vegetarian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
The Role of Supportive Home Environments for Maternal Nutrition in Liberia
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
J Ben Kitson , Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Joseph Millward, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nandita Kapadia Kundu, Vegetarian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Samantha Tsang
Eric Gaye, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
G. Dackermue Dolo, Research And Innovations Hub
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
User Generated Content: Partnering with private youth-led media to build an SRH brand for Indonesia’s unmarried youth
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Nenden Fathiastuti, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
DoktergenZ.hipwee.com combines CCP's family planning expertise and Hipwee's influence and expansive online community to engage Indonesia's unmarried adolescents around topics relating to sexual and reproductive health, personal growth, lifestyle and relationships. This public-private partnership was built with sustainability and youth capacity strengthening a core objectives. In 2017, MyChoice Indonesia, a Bill and Melinda Gates-funded project led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, began exploring approaches to expand access to sexual and reproductive health information to Indonesia's unmarried youth. From our formative research and participatory design workshops with youth, we determined that the best way to reach Indonesia's over 48 million adolescents, is to meet them where they already are. Where are Indonesia's youth?  Over one million of them are following Hipwee's social media. Hipwee is a youth-led and operated news and media company based in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. For the earlier moments of conceptualizing what became the Dokter Gen Z platform, CCP worked with Hipwee to explore content, formats, features and branding. CCP and Hipwee co-manage the Dokter Gen Z website and social media, working closely with the Youth Directorate of the National Family Planning Board (BKKBN) and the Youth Technical Working Group. Dokter Gen Z provides ASRH contents in various formats such as articles, infographics, video, e-book, and online chat feature. In two years of its establishment, Dokter Gen Z received over 8 million pageviews and monthly average 250,000 pageviews, largely due to our ability to leverage Hipwee sizable initial social media following.  
Through a child’s eyes: Using co-discovery, co-creation and co-design to understand barriers and motivators to child and adolescent nutrition in Armenia
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Nanna Skau, World Food Programme
Co-authors :
Rowena Merritt, UNICEF NYHQ
Profiling Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence during the COVID-19 pandemic using human centered design approach in Zimbabwe
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kumbirai Chatora, PSI
The "IYCF Campaign-in-a-box" toolkit in Tanzania: Improving IYCF through the design and pretest of SBCC campaign and materials at several stages of development.
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Winfrida Mayilla Meshack Mollel, N/A, GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR IMPROVED NUTRITION
Issack Kitururu, Jamii Intergrated Development Initiative
Tuzie Edwin, UNICEF
Grace Moshi, Ministry Of Health Tanzania
Co-authors :
Zineb Felix, No, Global Alliance For Improved Nutrition (GAIN)
Wendy Gonzales
Improving Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices is required to ensure children's healthy growth and development. The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), in partnership with the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Tanzania Ministry of Health (MoH) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), developed a toolkit for guiding the design, implementation and evaluation of communication campaigns and materials for promoting adequate IYCF. The "IYCF Campaign-in-a-box" toolkit was designed to create an inspirational campaign idea to promote exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), dietary diversity (DD), responsive feeding, among others. The development of a communication idea and materials for the "IYCF Campaign-in-a-box" toolkit involved the following process:  a) situation analysis that focused on public health needs, the prevalence of the targeted behaviour and recent SBCC interventions that covered the behaviours, b) concept testing, c) stakeholder reviews, d) pretesting of the creative elements and e) field testing though a campaign pilot. Initial learnings suggest that the pretest of the SBCC campaign and materials can improve the understandability and appeal to the target audience. This process allows for the necessary revisions to avoid the risk of releasing materials that could be misunderstood or rejected by the target audience. The "IYCF Campaign-in-a-Box" creative elements attempt to elevate the conversation beyond nutrition to connect culturally and emotionally with the target audience. These elements can be adapted and used alongside existing communication materials to reinforce the emotional benefits of adopting adequate IYCF practices.
What helps school children wash their hands? Using nudges to promote behavior change with rural schools in Timor-Leste
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kay Klumpyan, Mercy Corps
Ruben Lopes, Mercy Corps
What Does it Take to Provide Nurturing Care? Measuring caregiver resources
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Katherine Dickin, USAID-Advancing Nutrition
Co-authors :
Laura Itzkowitz, USAID
Getting it right! Stepwise SBC best practice through user-tested tools
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kelsey Torres, USAID Advancing Nutrition
Laura Itzkowitz, USAID
Brian Mdawida, The Manoff Group
Amelia Giancarlo, USAID Advancing Nutrition
People and their behaviors are at the heart of any nutrition program; however, it can be challenging to implement the high-quality SBC needed to address these behaviors. Nutrition is complex, often requiring multiple sectors and actors to align and harmonize efforts, while also trying to change behaviors that require multiple actions each day and that change with age. USAID Advancing Nutrition developed a suite of user-friendly, stepwise tools to help programmers achieve high-quality nutrition SBC across the program cycle. The tools help align priorities for nutrition programming across sectors to improve behaviors while navigating the complexities of nutrition behaviors and programming. They are based on global best practice and tailored to the nutrition sector's unique needs, though they can be adapted and applied to programming for other technical areas.The suite of tools includes-a tool to prioritize the most important behaviors to strengthen given available resources and potential impacta tool to design an SBC strategy based on formative research by creating pathways from influencing factors to activitiesa tool to monitor behaviors and influencing factors.Join this session to learn how these tools can give your programs a helpful boost! Programs will share their experiences using tools, including challenges and recommendations. Participants will walk away with ideas on how to use these tools to improve the quality of their SBC programming, regardless of sector. 
Learning from health providers: quality counseling for child nutrition
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kelsey Torres, USAID Advancing Nutrition
Co-authors :
Lisa Sherburne, USAID Advancing Nutrition Project
Laura Itzkowitz, USAID
Counseling can be an effective way to support improved practices. Many programs focus on training health workers to improve counseling, yet numerous factors, beyond health worker knowledge and skills, hinder its delivery. Research and program experience have documented multiple systemic, social, and individual level challenges to high quality counseling–from too little time with each client, to inequitable power dynamics between health workers and clients, to limited skills to listen and tailor recommendations. Global health and nutrition practitioners must find new ways to support health workers deliver this critical service. Through interviews and observations during two country case studies, health workers in Ghana and Nepal shared their perspectives and experiences with counseling during growth monitoring and promotion services. They identified numerous challenges, most notably time constraints, but they demonstrated strong capacity. They suggested ways to create a more enabling environment to support quality counseling and encourage positive practices. This session will share the voices of health workers in contributing solutions to this key SBC challenge, and how their solutions are being tested in Ghana and used in nutrition quality improvement processes in Nepal.
Going to scale using digital health communication to improve maternal newborn and child health outcomes: Sharing seven lessons learned from evidence and practice in India.
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Anna Godfrey, BBC Media Action
Co-authors :
Radharani Mitra, BBC Media Action
Sara Chamberlain
Direct to consumer (D2C) mobile communication programmes – delivering health information direct to families - offer great potential to disseminate maternal and child health information rapidly, at scale and at low cost. Similarly mobile health (mHealth) tools designed to support client-provider interaction have potential for improving the reach and quality of health information and advice in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Yet,  new evidence from India suggests these two different approaches can reach and impact different audience segments reinforcing the critical role for gender-intentional design in digital social and behaviour change communication (SBCC). This evidence was gathered from two independent evaluations of a SBCC project delivered as part of a wider initiative with the Government of Bihar to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and nutrition (RMNCHN). Multiple communication tools were designed to disseminate health information at a population level and support frontline worker (FLHW) outreach alongside mass media, community events and listening groups. Drawing on these evaluations and a decade of digital development, this presentation will share seven lessons for using digital and non-digital communication to shape health practices and demand.  It will reflect on the programme's use of human-centred design and share evidence from the first randomised controlled trial conducted to date of a D2C mobile communication programme in a LMIC operating at scale. It will demonstrate the important role of SBCC tools for FLHW to reach rural populations who don't have the education and income to benefit from digital D2C programmes.
Promoting Caregiver Early Childhood Development Behaviors through a Social and Behavior Change Communication Intervention in Tanzania
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Joshua West, Brigham Young University
Co-authors :
Eliza Broadbent
Generose Mulokozi, IMA World Health
Kirk Dearden, Corus International
Mary Linehan, IMA World Health
Dennis Cherian, Corus International
Scott Torres, RTI International
Benjamin Crookston, Brigham Young University
Cougar Hall, No, Brigham Young University
Contextualizing a gender-transformative approach: Adapting Program P for men and women in rural Mayan communities of Guatemala.
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Haydee Lemus, Jhpiego Guatemala
Co-authors :
Mirian Calel, Jhpiego Guatemala
Efren Gutierrez, Jhpiego Guatemala
Myra Betron, Jhpiego Corporation
Laura De Leon, Jhpiego In Guatemala
Your browser does not support HTML5 video.To promote gender transformative norms aimed at violence prevention, the USAID Health and Nutrition Project, implemented by Jhpiego in Guatemala (2021-2024), carried out a preparation process prior to implement an evidence-based tool, Program P, originally developed by Promundo, to ensure a culturally relevant and adapted approach for the Mayan population. It included:  Facilitate reflective sessions on gender and sexual and reproductive health (SRH): Using the Jhpiego Gender Transformation for Health toolkit, 95 people with role of facilitators participated.Train trainers: Using the evidence-based methodology of successful Program P (Promundo), 76 people were trained as facilitators/trainers.Validate GEM Scale: GEM scale was translated into six Mayan languages, a facilitation methodology was standardized, validation was carried out in the field and a data collection tool was developed.Prepare edu-entertainment material: job aids were designed for the facilitator, including educational games, and material for program participants ensuring a culturally relevant approach, are under validation process with men and women of rural communities.Coordinate with key partners: to support the implementation of Program P.Before implementing, it is necessary to train in basics of gender and SRH to sensitize on the importance of gender transformative norms to improve health outcomes; validate/adapt interventions to the local context; and make alliance with partners.The presentation will focus on how we prepared and contextualized the gender-transformative approach before implementing Program P in rural Guatemala.  Implementation just started in March 2022 and results will be shared at the end of the year.
“Healthy Child, Bright Future”: Multisectoral evidence-based SBC approaches to alleviate stunting in two provinces of Indonesia
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Ritu Ghosh, Nutrition International
Co-authors :
Tutut Sri Purwanti
Eriana Asri, Nutrition International
Mariance Octavia, Save The Children
Exploring digital modalities to increase youth engagement in Sexual Health Gender transformative programs
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Clara Alemann, Equimundo
Cody Ragonese, Promundo-US
Many Ways of Beings (MWB) is an innovative sexual health promotion program focused on addressing harmful gender norms and promoting healthy relationships among youth aged 15-19 experiencing health and well-being disparities due to gender, race and ethnicity. The program was adapted drawing on two evidence-based gender transformative curricula, Manhood 2.0 and Sisterhood 2.0 (designed for boys and girls respectively), that promote critical reflection on gender norms and stereotypes, the power dynamics that drive relationships, sexual and reproductive health behavior and underpin the use of violence. Building upon formative research and promising findings from Manhood 2.0 and Sisterhood 2.0, Promundo-US, with Healthy Teen Network, Child Trends and Latin American Youth Center conducted a human centered design research and redesign of the curriculum to strengthen its content with an intersectional lens to better address the lived realities of black and Latino youth of all genders in the greater Washington DC area. A digital engagement strategy co-developed with teens will address the challenges of sustaining meaningful engagement, and to reinforce the skills and behavior change content covered during the in-person program delivered in schools and non-school settings. We will present how the MWB curriculum was adapted and redesigned, piloted in 2022, and what we learnt from the results of the pilot and the feedback from participating youth. An experimental impact evaluation will be conducted after its full implementation in 2023 and 2025 to determine if a gender-synchronous model can yield significant improvements in healthy relationships and sexual health behaviors among Black and Latino teens.
Cross-cutting Findings from Human Centered Design Qualitative Research on Increasing Healthcare Service Utilization by Mothers of Young Children Across Four Regions of Madagascar
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Kathryn Sugg, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Elizabeth Larson
Tovo Ranaivonimo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Domoina Nivoharitsima, ACCESS
Since 2018, the Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) Project has worked to increase the adoption of healthy behaviors related to maternal and child health, water and sanitation, family planning, and malaria. Healthcare seeking by women of reproductive age, for themselves and their children under 5, serves as a cross-cutting behavior with linkages to these health areas. In 2020 and 2021, ACCESS conducted Human Centered Design (HCD) across four regions (n=697) to understand the drivers and barriers to accessing healthcare in Madagascar and identify possible innovative solutions.  A team consisting of researchers, program staff, and Ministry of Health (MoH) staff conducted in-depth individual interviews with formal and informal healthcare providers and focus group discussions with mothers, fathers, and grandmothers of children under 5. To gain greater understanding of the participants' lived experience, team members also conducted observations by spending additional time with mothers, fathers, and informal healthcare providers.After both rounds of research, three cross-cutting findings emerged. First, distance and cost surfaced as important barriers to healthcare service utilization. Second, acceuil (hospitality) was a key driver to care seeking. Third, depending on the gravity of the healthcare need, women may rely on different providers/treatments, including self-medication. The presentation will further detail these and other findings and discuss several prototypes of possible solutions to the challenge of increasing healthcare service utilization among women of reproductive age and mothers of young children. These findings suggest the value of conducting empathy-focused qualitative research, such as HCD. 
Leveraging co-design and diverse perspectives to create a scalable game that can boost couples’ communication in family planning
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Rahin Khandker, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Elizabeth McElwee, Ideas42
Emily Zimmerman, Ideas42
Susan Tino, IntraHealth International Inc.
Katelyn Bryant-Comstock, IntraHealth International Inc.
Denis Ako-Arrey, IntraHealth International Inc.
James Nyara, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Leanne Wolff, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Réduction des hésitations face aux vaccins COVID-19: Une approche d'Engagement communautaire pour améliorer l couverture vaccinale contre le COVID--19 en RDC
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Presented by :
Aschbel Kazadi, Save The Children
Co-authors :
FRANCINE NGALULA NTUMBA
Telesphore Kabore, Save The Children
Djingri OUOBA, Save The Children International
03:15PM - 04:00PM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Tea Break
Format : Tea Break
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Fes 1a
Media Approaches and Campaigns for Combatting HIV
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Christina Bwana, Ubongo
Brenda Simpasa
Justina Versencio Kaphako Phiri, USAID ZAM-Health Project
Moderators
Harriet Perlman , Heartlines
Take Control! Using interactive tools to reach young people with HIV prevention messages
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Brenda Simpasa
Justina Versencio Kaphako Phiri, USAID ZAM-Health Project
Co-authors :
Mwansa Charity Njelesani, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Despite Zambia's progress toward the 2020 90-90-90 UNAIDS targets, it still has 50,000 new HIV diagnoses per year (2021 UN General Assembly on HIV/AIDS). Zambia will not end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 if strategies to prevent new infections are not implemented. It is vital that young people be tested for HIV and start antiretroviral therapy and remain virally suppressed if positive. Those who are HIV-negative must be made aware of and have access to prevention interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis, condoms, and voluntary medical male circumcision.To this end, USAID DISCOVER-Health and USAID ZAM-Health are supporting the Ministry of Health's Zambia Ending AIDS (ZEA) campaign with innovative ways to reach young people who are at risk of contracting HIV. The ZEA campaign has developed multimedia materials including the Interpersonal Communication (IPC) Toolkit, Take Control Magazine, and the I'm in Control Radio series. 
I'm Still The Same
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Christina Bwana, Ubongo
Co-authors :
Michael Baruti
Multimedia as a tool for learning has been proven successful countless times across different cultures. This particular showcase uses multimedia to address the conversation of young children living with HIV in Africa, following the story of one girl's brave journey to combat social stigma. Through this video and the corresponding social media activities done around this story, parents and children have come forward to say how such a platform has allowed them to relate to and address their own journeys.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Fes 1c
Seeking Shared Meaning in Social Norms Approaches for Sustained Behavior Change : The Challenge Dialogue Continues
Format : Blue Skies Presentation
Speakers
Betsy Costenbader, FHI360
Jennifer Gayles, Save The Children USA
Seeking shared meaning in social norms approaches for sustained behavior change: The Challenge Dialogue continues
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Jennifer Gayles, Save The Children USA
Betsy Costenbader, FHI360
Co-authors :
Lenette Golding, Save The Children
Lisa Sherburne, USAID Advancing Nutrition Project
Anne Sprinkel , CARE
Kara Tureski, FHI360
Alessia Radice, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
In late 2020, the Passages Project called for a challenge dialogue to grapple with a perceived lack of community consensus regarding what is needed to ensure that social norms (SN) are adequately addressed in social and behavior change (SBC) programming and research. Over 100 SBC and SN implementers, researchers, and donors from around the world came together in a series of online discussions to deliberate on how best to apply SN approaches and measurement to SBC programming to facilitate and achieve sustained behavior change. Discussions resulted in a collaboratively-written Challenge Paper, which sought to capture the state of progress and points of agreement. Participants agreed that attentiveness to how SNs influence program implementation and outcomes can transform SBC work and acknowledged a growing body of evidence that explicitly links SN programming to successful SBC efforts. Discussions also identified how diverse cultural contexts and disciplinary backgrounds contribute to different perspectives on SN and how best to address them in SBC programming. Coming up short of consensus in many areas, we believe continued dialogue on this topic is needed. We seek to engage a broader audience of SBCC conference attendees in this debate to raise awareness of unanswered questions about how SN should be addressed in SBC and to prompt breakthroughs in thinking to lead to concrete next steps for bringing SN awareness into SBC work. SN experts will present four unresolved challenges and invite audience members to join them in breakout groups to develop recommendations and calls to action.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs
Media as a Classroom: Using Media Platforms for Education
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Entertainment Education | Gender
Speakers
Sowjanya Kanuri, Girl Effect
Sneha Chaturvedi, Girl Effect Enterprise India Private Limited
Gosia Lukomska, Peripheral Vision International
Eduardo Olvera, Khanga Rue Media LLC
Moderators
Youssouf Bamba
Noa Ubongo: East Africa's most popular youth learning platform
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Eduardo Olvera, Khanga Rue Media LLC
Co-authors :
Nisha Shah-Sanghvi, Khanga Rue
In Tanzania, 800,000 youth enter labor market each year with only 35% of them having completed their secondary education. And even those who have, lack the essential skills, knowledge and confidence to start a productive independent live. As a result, a lot of young people are stuck, unemployed and barely scraping by with their potential contribution to country's economic growth being wasted each day.In response to this Khanga Rue, a leading creative agency in East Africa, developed an online learning platform 'Noa Ubongo' ('Sharpen Your Brain' in Swahili). The platform offers free educational content on workforce readiness, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, agri-business and other topics that equip youth with skills required to gain financial independence. 'Noa Ubongo' content is in Swahili and accessible across an array of online channels. Since the launch Khanga Rue has partnered with a number of organisations, with a shared mission of empowering the youth, for content co-creation.Noa Ubongo now has over 40 classes and our content has been viewed for over 7 million times across different channels, reaching 12% of Tanzania's online youth population and beyond.  However, to counteract a limited internet and mobile phone penetration in rural Tanzania, 'Noa Ubongo' is also being disseminated through both formal and informal on the ground structures. For example, UNCDF Tanzania is using 'Noa Ubongo' content in refugee camps in Tanzania and Rwanda.  In 2022, Khanga Rue launched a podcast channel, with audio only classes in English hoping to reach a wider African audience.  
N*Gen - Africa's first science show for the next generation
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Gosia Lukomska, Peripheral Vision International
N*Gen (short form of "Next Generation" and pronounced "Engine") is the first Panafrican science tv show for young learners and their families. The show is designed to foster a culture of curiosity and discovery, model new holistic ways of approaching learning, increase trust in science and scientists, and promote positive gender norms.Conceptualized and launched at the onset of the COVID pandemic to help homebound children during lockdowns and school closures in Sub-Saharan Africa, N*Gen is now reaching millions of viewers through free-to-air pro bono tv broadcast on 45+ different networks across the continent, and more broadly via satellite. Educators and students worldwide are using the show and accompanying activity packs for their science learning at schools and homes alike via online platforms like Discovery Education. N*Gen is an engaging compilation of STEM educational segments delivered by charismatic teachers, exciting animations, quizzes, experiments, trips to the field where kids meet scientists and learn about their work and disciplines, as well as interstitials with fitness and mindfulness exercises, or tips for healthy living.Season Two of the show uses climate change as a through line to explore a range of pressing topics, like ocean conservation, ecosystem change, disease misinformation/myth busting, vaccines, and human-wildlife interactions, among other topics. Twenty six (26) half-hour episodes filmed in Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda have been produced thus far and PVI is currently in pre-production phase for Season Three of the show, which includes research trials to evaluate its impact.
Building India’s first digital media SBCC ecosystem to inspire and equip adolescent girls to take greater control of their sexual and reproductive health
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Sneha Chaturvedi, Girl Effect Enterprise India Private Limited
Sowjanya Kanuri, Girl Effect
Girl Effect's youth brand, Chhaa Jaa ('Go forth and shine') is India's first digital media SBCC ecosystem designed for lower-income, adolescent girls across the northern, Hindi belt. Launched in 2019, Chhaa Jaa's focus is on inspiring and equipping girls with the right skills and confidence to navigate the critical time of adolescence.Leveraging the exploding access to the internet by young girls in India, Chhaa Jaa has been designed with and for adolescent girls to help them write their own story. Our multi-channel approach across 'broadcast' content and 'interactive' conversations supports girls along the entire behaviour change journey. We focus on the girl, and actions that she can take - motivating her, giving her the ability to take that action via the right tools and resources and then facilitating and enabling the actual behaviour itself. Each product plays a unique role, and through a sophisticated targeting approach we ensure we reach the right audience.A detailed understanding of our audience's existing media landscape within which we must fit, married with techniques from behaviour change theory have informed our design process to create content formats and technology products that girls love, trust and need.Over almost three years of building out Chhaa Jaa in a lean and iterative manner, we have demonstrated that this model works - having reached over 10 million girls and demonstrating proof of impact of our model.  
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Fes 2a
Inspiring Champions using Multimedia Approaches
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Digital/Mobile | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Daisy Tuzo Akoya, Planned Parenthood Global -ARO
Ruth Momanyi, Planned Parenthood Global Africa Regional Office
Cholpon Ibraimova, USAID Cure TB Project Implemented By JSI Research And Training Institute, Inc
Vithika Yadav, Love Matters India/Development Consortium
Moderators
Nicola Harford, IMedia Associates Ltd
Mobikaar - The new age 'mobile' content creators
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Vithika Yadav, Love Matters India/Development Consortium
Love Matters India launched Mobikaar - Naye zamane ke partakaar (new age 'mobile' content creators), a multifaceted programme in Bihar and Jharkhand to train adolescents in 21st-century (content) skills, generate awareness on sexual & reproductive health and build communication with parents, educators and community elders as key stakeholders. The program combines 21st-century (content/journalism) skills, generates awareness on sexual & reproductive health and builds capacity of young people on mobile journalism and content production skills. Even as India reeled under the second wave of Covid-19, the Mobikaar programme provided a platform for young people from rural areas to engage, learn, connect and share. The skills being developed as part of the Mobikaar programme also include public speaking, news research, video and audio content generation. The Mobikaars tested their skills with an issue-based video, interviewing members of their family/community on experiences, awareness, and attitudes towards various SRHR issues. A total of 80 youth advocates (90 percent young women participants) successfully participated and completed the programme and are now advocating for their community issues and rights using mobile journalism skills and using various digital platform like YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrmW-2MHNUVMbo19XDFVrEg/playlists) to publish SRHR stories. The project was executed with community-based organisations and local public health centres. The successful completion of this project officially broadened our mission parameters from 'normalising comprehensive sex education to 'enabling young girls and women to exercise their rights to make decisions about their bodies, lives and future.'
Harnessing the power of authentic voices: Behavioral journalism and media partnerships for behavior change in tuberculosis in Kyrgyzstan
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Cholpon Ibraimova, USAID Cure TB Project Implemented By JSI Research And Training Institute, Inc
Co-authors :
Samantha Huffman, USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Nuriia Imankulova, USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Anarbek Alimakhunov, USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Ainura Ibraimova, USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Behavioral journalism uses stories of real people who can demonstrate desired behaviors and serve as role models for behavior change. The USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project in Kyrgyzstan uses a behavioral journalism approach to produce short documentary videos showcasing real stories of tuberculosis (TB) patients, their families, health care workers, and communities to illustrate positive behaviors relating to TB testing, treatment, and support to TB patients. An illustrative compilation of five videos presented here includes: one video of a TB patient and one of a health worker illustrating the challenges of treatment adherence, one video on a wife's role as treatment supporter to her husband with TB, one video on a husband's support to his wife with TB illustrating gender barriers, and one video on psychosocial and financial support to TB patients by local government. These videos illustrate the multi-faceted sources of support from family, community, and the health system needed to assist a TB patient through completion of treatment. These videos are distributed using a dissemination approach involving mass media, social media, and closed circuit televisions in doctors' offices. Videos have been broadcast almost 2,000 times on television and 70 times on social media. The project also partners with the media to train journalists on TB and on using behavioral journalism to report on TB in an accurate and non-stigmatizing way. Behavioral journalism is an effective and compelling approach to sharing stories with which people can identify, using credible messages and patient-centered and authentic voices.
An integrated ecosystem for realizing youth sexual reproductive health and rights (YSRHR) and livelihoods
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Daisy Tuzo Akoya, Planned Parenthood Global -ARO
Ruth Momanyi, Planned Parenthood Global Africa Regional Office
The Billi Now Now! (BNN!) program supports young people in Burkina Faso, trained as 'Billis', to be sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) leaders within their communities. "Billi Now Now!" (BNN!) - an allusion to the one billion young people on the planet and the urgency of their needs. The BNN! project has a rallying call of: "a billion young people, in charge of their bodies, culture, and destiny." In the first six month  pilot phase,  the BNN! project recruited and trained 100 Billis who developed and executed their own messaging through dynamic online platforms and community activities, and created new and unique spaces for Burkinabe youth to access SRHR information. The Billis also made in-person referrals to connect young people to services using paper coupons.Over 8,500 young people were referred for services using referral coupons (before the digital platform roll) out  out of which 1,600( 20% )of the successfully received services.In 2021, PP Global built a digital referral platform to optimize the referral process to the clinics.March 2021 to date,  12,000 young people have been enrolled on the platform (65% female and 35% male). Over 12,500 SRH services (including  contraceptives, abortion and post abortion care, SRH counselling, HIV counselling and testing  to 23 facilities that are available to provide SRH services for young people being referred.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Aud des Ministres
Using Multimedia to Influence Gender Norms
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Entertainment Education | Gender | Inclusion
Speakers
Anushka Shah, Civic Studios
Namrata Sharma
Acacio Sarmento, Mercy Corps
Fitsum Habtemariam
Joseph Minde, BBC Media Action - Tanzania
Moderators
Karen Hampson, Farm Radio International
"Vakeel Babu": A fictional short-film advocating gender sensitization in the Indian judiciaryVakeel Babu is an entertaining, fictional Hindi language short film (with English Subtitles) starring renowned Bollywood actors and expected to release on a prominent digital platform, supported by an on-ground advocacy campaign. Globally, domestic violence cases against women increased sharply during Covid-19, renewing a sense of urgency around ensuring access to justice. Through in-depth primary research with over 120 diverse stakeholders including domestic violence survivors, civil society organizations, lawyers, medical experts, and police across 3 Indian cities, it was discovered that the lack of gender sensitization in the judiciary is a key reason for its inaccessibility. To tackle this, Vakeel Babu was created. It's the story of Shiraz Hassan, a young lawyer, distracted with chasing success through his digital-video channel. He is approached online by an anonymous female victim with a powerful abuser. Will he do justice to the challenge? The film is an appeal to lawyers to take an empathetic, sensitive approach in securing their clients' rights, no matter how unwieldy the system. It is a means to engage multiple stakeholders to create systemic change within the judiciary.Vakeel Babu leverages storytelling to advocate for on-ground change. It is designed to maximize impact by making use of successful SBCC strategies, such as developing the protagonist as a transitional character. The impact campaign includes advocacy with legal groups, law students and law colleges, bar associations, and various multi-media outlets to advocate for gender-sensitive lawyering and to make access to justice more inclusive and equitable.Food, Frustrations, and Family Dynamics: Using Film to Promote Joint Household Decision-MakingImproving women's nutritional status is essential to break the intergenerational cycle of undernutrition. A women's household labor load affects her ability to earn income and the time she has available for self-care and childcare. Male involvement in household tasks and childcare decreases women's labor burden, allows women increased time for optimal feeding practices, and increases fathers' emotional attachment to their children. Joint decision-making between couples has the potential to increase the consumption of, and allocation of household resources to acquire nutritious foods. TOMAK developed a low budget film in collaboration with a local organization, Ba Futuru, which focuses on household decision-making, the allocation of household resources for nutritious foods, and the role of fathers and grandmothers in influencing family nutrition. To assess the effectiveness of the film as an SBCC tool, a questionnaire was administered to audiences prior to watching the film. The questionnaire was re-administered three months later following two film screenings and discussions. Results showed: increased frequency of protein consumption, increased allocation of limited resources to purchase protein foods, improved attitudes towards increased communication between spouses and role of grandmothers in supporting household nutrition. TOMAK demonstrated a low-cost approach to effectively evaluate the impact of quality SBCC products that can support government counterparts to measure behavior change. Results from this film assessment helped TOMAK to better understand how effective its SBCC product is, while providing a basis for discussions with Ministry of Health and partners on how to improve evaluation strategies for SBCC materials going forward.Innovative SBCC interventions through the #BilumCampaign: Harnessing Papua New Guinea's traditional culture to advance gender equality and bodily autonomyHarnessing the idea of the bilum as "surprisingly familiar" the campaign builds on the bilum patterns to reintroduce haus mahn (man's house) and haus meri (woman's house) conversations in safe spaces about social expectations on gender equality, reproductive health and bodily autonomy. We leverage influential elders from PNG for discussions about a modern PNG identity and social norms for men and women, including the need for access to, and information about reproductive health for the health and wellbeing of all Papua New Guineans. Historically, bilum patterns reaffirmed social norms and strengthened trust between generations. For example, the onset of puberty marked by the full diamond bilum pattern was when younger girls entered a Haus Meri (woman's house) to learn about their bodies and build their social network. Today, knowledge of how to "read" the bilum has almost disappeared, as have the conversations that once reaffirmed women's social authority and sisterhood. When such traditions are lost, cultural identity is also at risk, making the development journey more difficult. By leveraging past wisdom to recreate safe spaces for reflection ahead of the country's 50th anniversary, the Bilum Campaign empowers a generation of Papua New Guineans to reconnect with their original vision for development and wellbeing.NIAMBIE! - Tell me!"Niambie!" Or "Tell Me!", as it is translated into English is a nationwide youth centered radio show in Tanzania with a strong and growing social media presence. We focus on delivering gender transformative content. Utilizing multiple platforms, we encourage discussion on topics relating to promoting gender equality, including challenging the idea that specific careers should be assigned to specific genders. We get our audiences to tell us their views, so we can build on them, address them and if necessary, correct them. So that after consuming our content they leave empowered and knowledgeable. Our weekly radio show airs on Saturday. Each week we tackle a different topic that highlights issues of relevance going on in our community, addressing and challenging any norms which hinder gender equality. Norms which we have identified to be prevalent through our research. We then use testimonials from relevant sources, SMS's and comments from our audience, which we read out on our shows, as well as experts to provide a well-rounded, solution-based show. In addition, we host Community Live Events which bring issues facing the community directly to them. A nationwide survey consisting of 4005 participants, in 2020, shows us that radio and mobile phones are the main media used in Tanzania, this is one of the motivations to having a multimedia approach. Research suggests that the public like consuming entertainment, comedy, and drama the most, among other things. Therefore, we try and package our content using these formats to have better reach, engagement, and impact.
“Vakeel Babu”: A fictional short-film advocating gender sensitization in the Indian judiciary
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Anushka Shah, Civic Studios
Namrata Sharma
Co-authors :
Roohi Bhatia, Civic Studios
Vakeel Babu is an entertaining, fictional Hindi language short film (with English Subtitles) starring renowned Bollywood actors and expected to release on a prominent digital platform, supported by an on-ground advocacy campaign. Globally, domestic violence cases against women increased sharply during Covid-19, renewing a sense of urgency around ensuring access to justice. Through in-depth primary research with over 120 diverse stakeholders including domestic violence survivors, civil society organizations, lawyers, medical experts, and police across 3 Indian cities, it was discovered that the lack of gender sensitization in the judiciary is a key reason for its inaccessibility. To tackle this, Vakeel Babu was created. It's the story of Shiraz Hassan, a young lawyer, distracted with chasing success through his digital-video channel. He is approached online by an anonymous female victim with a powerful abuser. Will he do justice to the challenge? The film is an appeal to lawyers to take an empathetic, sensitive approach in securing their clients' rights, no matter how unwieldy the system. It is a means to engage multiple stakeholders to create systemic change within the judiciary.Vakeel Babu leverages storytelling to advocate for on-ground change. It is designed to maximize impact by making use of successful SBCC strategies, such as developing the protagonist as a transitional character. The impact campaign includes advocacy with legal groups, law students and law colleges, bar associations, and various multi-media outlets to advocate for gender-sensitive lawyering and to make access to justice more inclusive and equitable.
Food, Frustrations, and Family Dynamics: Using Film to Promote Joint Household Decision-Making
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Acacio Sarmento, Mercy Corps
Co-authors :
Sarah Meyanathan, Adam Smith International
Kristine Larsen, TOMAK
Improving women's nutritional status is essential to break the intergenerational cycle of undernutrition. A women's household labor load affects her ability to earn income and the time she has available for self-care and childcare. Male involvement in household tasks and childcare decreases women's labor burden, allows women increased time for optimal feeding practices, and increases fathers' emotional attachment to their children. Joint decision-making between couples has the potential to increase the consumption of, and allocation of household resources to acquire nutritious foods.TOMAK developed a low budget film in collaboration with a local organization, Ba Futuru, which focuses on household decision-making, the allocation of household resources for nutritious foods, and the role of fathers and grandmothers in influencing family nutrition.To assess the effectiveness of the film as an SBCC tool, a questionnaire was administered to audiences prior to watching the film. The questionnaire was re-administered three months later following two film screenings and discussions. Results showed: increased frequency of protein consumption, increased allocation of limited resources to purchase protein foods, improved attitudes towards increased communication between spouses and role of grandmothers in supporting household nutrition.TOMAK demonstrated a low-cost approach to effectively evaluate the impact of quality SBCC products that can support government counterparts to measure behavior change. Results from this film assessment helped TOMAK to better understand how effective its SBCC product is, while providing a basis for discussions with Ministry of Health and partners on how to improve evaluation strategies for SBCC materials going forward. 
Innovative SBCC interventions through the #BilumCampaign: Harnessing Papua New Guinea’s traditional culture to advance gender equality and bodily autonomy
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Fitsum Habtemariam
Harnessing the idea of the bilum as "surprisingly familiar" the campaign builds on the bilum patterns to reintroduce haus mahn (man's house) and haus meri (woman's house) conversations in safe spaces about social expectations on gender equality, reproductive health and bodily autonomy. We leverage influential elders from PNG for discussions about a modern PNG identity and social norms for men and women, including the need for access to, and information about reproductive health for the health and wellbeing of all Papua New Guineans.  Historically, bilum patterns reaffirmed social norms and strengthened trust between generations. For example, the onset of puberty marked by the full diamond bilum pattern was when younger girls entered a Haus Meri (woman's house) to learn about their bodies and build their social network. Today, knowledge of how to "read" the bilum has almost disappeared, as have the conversations that once reaffirmed women's social authority and sisterhood. When such traditions are lost, cultural identity is also at risk, making the development journey more difficult. By leveraging past wisdom to recreate safe spaces for reflection ahead of the country's 50th anniversary, the Bilum Campaign empowers a generation of Papua New Guineans to reconnect with their original vision for development and wellbeing. 
NIAMBIE! - TELL ME!
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Joseph Minde, BBC Media Action - Tanzania
"Niambie!" Or "Tell Me!", as it is translated into English is a nationwide youth centered radio show in Tanzania with a strong and growing social media presence. We focus on delivering gender transformative content. Utilizing multiple platforms, we encourage discussion on topics relating to promoting gender equality, including challenging the idea that specific careers should be assigned to specific genders.We get our audiences to tell us their views, so we can build on them, address them and if necessary, correct them. So that after consuming our content they leave empowered and knowledgeable.Our weekly radio show airs on Saturday. Each week we tackle a different topic that highlights issues of relevance going on in our community, addressing and challenging any norms which hinder gender equality. Norms which we have identified to be prevalent through our research. We then use testimonials from relevant sources, SMS's and comments from our audience, which we read out on our shows, as well as experts to provide a well-rounded, solution-based show. In addition, we host Community Live Events which bring issues facing the community directly to them. A nationwide survey consisting of 4005 participants, in 2020, shows us that radio and mobile phones are the main media used in Tanzania, this is one of the motivations to having a multimedia approach. Research suggests that the public like consuming entertainment, comedy, and drama the most, among other things. Therefore, we try and package our content using these formats to have better reach, engagement, and impact.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Youth Space
Youth Space
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Karam 1
Expanding the Role of Youth in Their Own Healthcare
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Misinformation/Infodemic | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Martha Silva, Tulane University / Population Council
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Hala Benjelloun Andaloussi, Ministère De La Santé Maroc
Woinshet Zeleke, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Yidnekachew Negede, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Gerda Binder, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Moderators
Gael O'Sullivan, Kantar Public
Can Digital SBC Break the Stubborn Taboo of Menstruation for the Next Generation?
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Gerda Binder, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Do you think we can ever break this outdated yet suborn taboo of menstruation? Girls all over the world have had enough. Stigma, secrecy, misinformation, and harmful practices shape their lives and wellbeing when being on their periods. Girls want to change that by using the power of digital SBC to deliver girl-centered, evidence-based menstruation education and period tracking to anyone who can access a mobile phone. To demonstrate this, girls co-created a unique, open source app 'Oky' with UNICEF and local partners that meets their realities, and transforms shame into empowerment. With the prototype designed and released in Indonesia and Mongolia, the Oky app is now scaling across the globe. Mexico and India teams have already deployed a localized Oky version, 10 more countries plan to launch in 2022. An ecosystem of partners from all sectors of society are joining together in the efforts to bring Oky to millions of girls; to iterate and scale this girl-led SBC digital tool to break the taboo and end discriminatory practices. With girls in the driver seat, the sky is the limit for build-out and impact. For Girls. By Girls. Period.
Youth Engagement in the Rollout of Digital Health Information Systems: Achievements and Lessons from the Field
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Woinshet Zeleke, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Yidnekachew Negede, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Co-authors :
Rahel Yitbarek, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Biruhtesfa Asaye, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Loko Bongassie, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Netsanet Nigussie, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Herman Willems, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Tariku Bogale, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Background: Strong healthcare system requires the establishment of a robust health information system (HIS). In Ethiopia, the support provided to health institutions on Information Communication Technology (ICT) is inadequate due to lack of well trained and skilled human resources. Approaches:  Digital Health Activity (DHA) is a five-year USAID-funded project that supports the health sector to build a sustainable HIS in Ethiopia through digitalization, data use, and governance. The project has engaged youth in digital health interventions through the provision of internship opportunities, training on digital tools, training on leadership and management, and provision of seed money to establish enterprises that can provide support services to health facilities using digital technologies. Results: The project provided internship training to 155 fresh Technology graduates of which 90.3% of them revived an additional training on Entrepreneurship & Business Engagement.  These trainees formed 13 youth enterprises with the support of DHA. The youth enterprises provided support for more than 650 health institutions on digital tool development and maintenance, deployment of tools, local area network installation, and point care application. Lessons learned: Effective and meaningful engagement of the youth in digital health interventions ensure the sustainability of HIS in the healthcare system.
Peer Networks as the Source of Resistance to Myths and Misinformation About Contraception Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women (AGYW) in Kenya
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Myths and misinformation about contraception, which inform and reinforce negative norms, remain the key barrier to AGYW's uptake and sustained use of modern contraception. In Kenya, low use of contraception leads to high rates of teenage pregnancies, which has long been the subject of concerns of the international development community and is expected to worsen due to COVID-19. Many current SBC interventions focus on individual demographic and socio-graphic characteristics of AGYW as the predictors of the use of contraception and risk of unintended pregnancies, thus, overlooking the influence of social/peer networks in informing or misinforming AGYW about the impact of contraception on their health and wellbeing, and reinforcing specific SRH norms and behaviors.In this study, we further explore the power of peer networks and associated norms to positively influence AGYW sentiment, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors related to contraception, encourage resistance to negative social norms, stimulate the search for accurate information from medical professionals, and encourage conversations between AGYW and their sexual partners that lead to consistent use of dual methods of modern contraception in all or most sexual encounters. Analyzing nationally representative data on Kenyan female youth collected from five cross sectional annual surveys from 2017-2021, we estimate the magnitude of peer effects on measures of positive and negative sentiment towards contraceptive users and on contraceptive use itself, finding that peers can both directly and indirectly influence contraceptive outcomes.This study offers important, actionable insights for designing and implementing effective SRH interventions with AGYW in Kenya and elsewhere.
Changing the Script: Intergenerational Communication About Sexual and Reproductive Health in Niger and Côte d’Ivoire
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Martha Silva, Tulane University / Population Council
Co-authors :
Sethson Kassegne, CERA Group
Rebecca Ezouatchi, CERA GROUP
Robert-Hugues Yaovi Nagbe
Lorimpo Babogou
Leanne Dougherty, Population Council
Most strategies to reduce adolescent pregnancies have been designed to educate adolescents directly about aspects of sexual risk taking and benefits of family planning (FP), while adolescents often cite peers and parents as their primary sources of sexual health information. Yet parents' lack of knowledge about sexual and reproductive health (SRH), low self-efficacy to initiate conversations, and adverse social norms act as barriers to open intergenerational communication. To help fill the evidence gap about facilitating intergenerational communication in Francophone West Africa, results from a Breakthrough RESEARCH multi-stage qualitative study in Niger and Côte d'Ivoire are presented. During Stage 1, the research team developed a screening tool (based on a literature review) to categorize research participants into those who practiced open intergenerational communication about FP/RH, and those who did not. Stage 2 consisted of 80 in-depth interviews with young people (ages 15-24) and adults (≥25 years old), stratified by quality of intergenerational communication. Results showed a narrow interpretation of SRH and differing views between the two countries as to who should broach these subjects with adolescents and youth. Among adults in both countries, fear is the dominant sentiment underlying communication about SRH with youth and adolescents. Implications for the field include demystifying and destigmatizing SRH topics, increasing adults' communication skills, changing the "script" to a more life-affirming view of SRH, and adopting gender-transformative approaches that encourage shared rights and responsibilities among adolescents and youth.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Karam 2
Shifting Gender and Institutional Norms to Address IPV and GBV
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Inclusion | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Nama Vanier, Sayara International
Kathryn M. Barker, University Of California San Diego
Akanksha Agarwal, Dalberg
Shruthi Jayaram, Dalberg
Swetha Totapally, Dalberg
Maritess Cruz, Feminist Media Lab
Julienne Gregorio, Feminist Media Lab
Raniel Aragon, Feminist Media Lab
Jose Juan Dela Rosa, USAID ReachHealth
Moderators
Jacqueline Oliveira, ThinkPlace US
From Victimization to Visions of Change: How to Campaign against Gender-Based Violence without Violence
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Maritess Cruz, Feminist Media Lab
Julienne Gregorio, Feminist Media Lab
Raniel Aragon, Feminist Media Lab
Jose Juan Dela Rosa, USAID ReachHealth
The majority of the victim-survivors of Gender-Based Violence (GBV) are women and people of diverse sexualities. However, the discourse on GBV is still dominated by the male gaze. Communication materials on GBV are shaped around the image of a powerless woman experiencing grave physical or sexual violence from an unseen male partner. The victim-survivors are thus twice violated. First, by their abusers, and second by representations that reduce them into mere objects of violence or by being omitted altogether. The persisting culture of silence, shame, and stigma surrounding GBV is evidence that this image and its attendant narrative have limited power in promoting help-seeking behavior among victim-survivors and gender justice in the larger society. In order to transform public discourse on GBV and promote the empowerment of victim-survivors, Feminist Media Lab integrated a custom-designed method called the Likha-Laya (Create Freedom): Feminist Check In for Survivor-Centered GBV Content Creation, an application of feminist critical discourse analysis, in the content production process of the FamiLigtas (SafeFamiles) online campaign against GBV. The resulting audience engagement of the campaign demonstrates that Likha-Laya (Create Freedom) can promote desired behavioral outcomes including disclosures, affirmations, and help-seeking messages among GBV victim-survivors through critical and empowering messages while expanding the discourse on GBV as issues of sexual and reproductive health and rights and social justice. 
Building the Imperative for Social Change in How Violence Against Women and Girls is Perceived in the Global Development and Political Agenda -- Based on the Estimation and Articulation of Impacts of the Spotlight Initiative, the Largest Global Model on t
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Akanksha Agarwal, Dalberg
Shruthi Jayaram, Dalberg
Swetha Totapally, Dalberg
Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is buried in the social change discourse even though data has repeatedly shown that it limits collective global progress. It affects 700-750 million women and girls worldwide today, takes an unimaginably enormous number of lives every year, and costs the global GDP US$1.7 trillion annually. Despite that, VAWG prevention is severely underfunded and overlooked in global development and political agenda, like other issues that disproportionately affect women and girls.Why this paradox? In our experience, it is because key decision-makers and leaders believe that it is a niche and intractable, household-level problem. However, the evidence today does not support these beliefs.This study is a first-of-its-kind attempt at putting forth a new narrative on how preventing VAWG can have a large transformative effect on individuals, nations, and nearly all SDGs. The study estimates the multitudes and magnitudes of the impacts of the Spotlight Initiative – the largest global effort investing EUR 500 Mn on the issue today. This work could be a case study in SBCC as it takes a differentiated approach – i.e., an 'opportunity' framing – to develop a funding and impacts narrative before global decision-making institutions such as the multilateral funders.Ultimately, the goal is to propagate the 'opportunity' and insights worldwide to drive multiply greater funding and attention to the issue of violence against women and girls.
Patriarchal Norms and Intimate Partner Violence in India: The Use of National Data to Examine Spatial Patterning and Associations
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Kathryn M. Barker, University Of California San Diego
Co-authors :
Praveen Chokhandre
Ajeet Singh, International Institute For Population Sciences
Kaushalendra Kumar, International Institute For Population Sciences
Abhishek Singh, UNICEF
Anita Raj, University Of California, San Diego
Lotus McDougal
Using data from the domestic violence module of the Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4) and a novel composite measure assessing patriarchy, we examine the district-level spatial patterning of patriarchal norms in India and their association to women's experience of intimate partner violence (IPV). Geospatial mapping is used to examine district-level clustering of patriarchal norms across India. Logistic multilevel regression models are used to assess the association between patriarchal norms at the district-level and IPV among married females (ages 15-49) at the individual-level. Given that the gendered aspects of patriarchal norms are related but distinct from norms of violence, we also add a 'attitudes of IPV' variable (women's attitudes on the acceptability of wife beating) to multilevel models to assess the extent to which this variable mediates the association between patriarchal norms and IPV. Results from logistic multilevel models indicate that, holding demographic covariates constant, for every 1-point increase in patriarchal norms at the district-level, there is a 2% increase in associated odds of experiencing IPV. Finally, when 'attitudes of IPV' are entered into the multilevel models, we find they attenuate but do not fully explain the association between patriarchal norms and IPV. Our findings provide empirical evidence indicating that the etiology of IPV goes beyond violence-related norms to include those related to inequitable gender relations. Addressing patriarchal norms within the broader community is an important aspect of SBC programming aiming to improve health and interpersonal outcomes among Indian women.
Estudio Nacional de Tolerancia Social e Institucional a la Violencia Contra las Mujeres, las Niñas y las Adolescentes (VCMNA) en Honduras
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Nama Vanier, Sayara International
Co-authors :
Gianluca Giuman, Sayara International
El "Estudio nacional de tolerancia social e institucional a la violencia contra las mujeres, niñas y adolescentes (VCMNA) en Honduras", que se inscribe en la estrategia de Prevención de la Iniciativa Spotlight, es el primer estudio latinoamericano que mide los niveles de percepción de prevalencia de la VCMNA y los asocia a los niveles de arraigo de las normas de género. Al implementar un enfoque interseccional, los datos desagregados permitieron comprender como la VCMNA se cruza con otras discriminaciones.El estudio es pionero en cuantificar el arraigo de las normas sociales sexistas y, a través de un modelo econométrico, establece las que tienen mayor probabilidad de influenciar comportamientos nocivos y la VCMNA. Adicionalmente, el estudio representa el primer caso centroamericano para medir la autopercepción de los niveles de tolerancia institucional a la VCMNA, entre los sectores del estado que tienen responsabilidad en prevenir la VCMNA y activar las rutas de atención a las sobrevivientes.Los resultados de la encuesta nacional permitieron establecer: a) un índice nacional de percepción de prevalencia de la VCMNA, b) los niveles de prevalencia de las distintas formas de VCMNA, c) establecer las normas sociales con mayor arraigo, d) definir las creencias normativas más prevalentes, y e) brindar evidencias para priorizar las normas de género mas influyentes. El análisis de datos sirvió para diseñar una teoría de cambio que guiará campañas de comunicaciones para el cambio social y de comportamiento, así como otras intervenciones para erradicar en Honduras.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Karam 3
Empathy—the Keystone of Effective Provider Behavior Change
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Inclusion | Maternal Health
Speakers
Lydia Murithi, Pathfinder International
Aminta Gueye, ThinkPlace Sénégal
Alison Pack, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Ashley Riley, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Empathy is the keystone of effective provider behavior change (PBC) initiatives. Empathy, in the context of PBC, is the cultivation of a deep understanding of providers: motivators, challenges, facilitators, and realities that impact their work and daily lives. Placing empathy at the center of PBC processes (research and programs) fosters genuine understanding of the diverse factors influencing provider behavior and what providers need to deliver quality care. Equipped with an understanding of provider needs, desires, and realities, stakeholders can work together with providers to support positive provider behavior and ultimately improve the quality of care and client health outcomes. Breakthrough ACTION, Beyond Bias, and ThinkPlace will share examples of placing empathy at the heart of PBC initiatives. Breakthrough ACTION will share a new toolkit that provides an empathetic process for identifying, prioritizing, and addressing provider behavior. Beyond Bias will share work in humanizing bias by building empathy, giving social affirmation, and providing concrete support for behavior change in Tanzania, Burkina Faso, and Pakistan. ThinkPlace will share its efforts to improve prenatal visits in Mali by using empathy to foster a sense of mutual understanding and respect between and among midwives and pregnant women. Attendees will learn about a range of empathy-first approaches used in formative research, program design, and programmatic response. Attendees will also be introduced to an empathy checklist to guide their PBC work. Finally, attendees will gain experience placing empathy at the center of this work through hands-on interaction with each group's PBC tools.
Humanizing Bias: The Beyond Bias Behavior Change Strategy
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Lydia Murithi, Pathfinder International
Co-authors :
Theo Gibbs, YLabs
Rebecca Hope, YLabs
Upendo Laizer, Pathfinder International
Bagnomboe Bakiono, Pathfinder International
Muhammad Sharjeel, Pathfinder International
Provider bias and judgmental behavior is a major barrier to the use of contraception by young people. Training and supervision efforts have been inadequate to address bias towards youth and adolescents seeking contraceptive services. To disrupt the status quo, Beyond Bias project, implemented by Pathfinder International in collaboration with YLabs, Camber Collective and BERI, developed an innovative behavior change strategy to combat this entrenched barrier to care.The Beyond Bias Behavior Change Strategy integrates three solutions: i) Summit - a story-driven event designed to facilitate dialogue and reflection on provider bias and build empathy for young people's needs; ii) Connect – an interactive forum for knowledge sharing and learning, and iii) Rewards – a growth-oriented non-monetary performance-based incentive assessed through client feedback on provider behavior. The model is designed to empathetically support health care providers at every phase of their journey from developing awareness of their own bias, working to overcome them, applying unbiased care practices, to becoming advocates for improving contraceptive services for youth in their community. This new approach seeks to humanize bias by building empathy, giving social affirmation, and providing concrete support and social rewards that can change behavior.Beyond Bias employed a rigorous multidisciplinary approach that included an intensive human-centered design (HCD) process. HCD was used to generate more than 100 brainstorming ideas by partners, providers, and youth; and to winnow them into one integrated intervention through multiple rounds of testing, iteration, and refinement.
Leveraging empathy to open and strengthen communication channels in Mali
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Aminta Gueye, ThinkPlace Sénégal
Co-authors :
Samira Matan, ThinkPlace Sénégal
Isabel Sandoval, ThinkPlace
Jacqueline Oliveira, ThinkPlace US
Midwives in Mali are overworked, stressed and work in difficult situations. An emotionally strained and exhausted midwife might not always treat their clients empathetically. Between 2020 and 2021, ThinkPlace worked with Jhpiego to improve the interactions between midwives and pregnant women by 1) helping midwives cope with trauma and chronic stress and 2) improving pregnant women's experiences of maternal health services. Through a journey map, we defined the key interactions between midwives and pregnant women and, using human-centered design, developed three interventions between midwives and clients by using empathy to improve quality of care and empathetic service delivery. The first intervention leveraged existing support groups to help midwives cope with the trauma and chronic stress of their work. The second intervention focused on improving interactions between pregnant women and midwives during antenatal consultations to help foster a caring and honest relationship. The last intervention focused on improving the waiting time for pregnant women, as long wait times can be a source of frustration that can extend to the consultation.We realized that empathy was vital to creating a culture of sharing that helped recreate relationships, build a sense of mutual understanding and restore trust. Empowering midwives to be intentional with how they are transferring knowledge to pregnant women allows the consultation to feel more like a discussion. When people open up and share, it creates a bond that improves interactions. The recommended concepts all revolve around empathy and focus on sharing experiences, anxieties, stress and  joy.
Embracing Empathy to Design More Impactful Provider Behavior Solutions
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Alison Pack, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Ashley Riley, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Angela Acosta, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Danielle Piccinini Black, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Jacqueline Oliveira, ThinkPlace US
Abel Ferreira-Mendes, ThinkPlace
Juanita Rodriguez, ThinkPlace
Improving health provider behavior is crucial to achieving health and development goals. Providers operate in complex systems, and many factors influence their behaviors, including norms, health systems, client interactions, and individuals' own beliefs and attitudes. Breakthrough ACTION used an empathetic, co-design approach with providers (as experts of their own behaviors) to create a provider behavior change toolkit for family planning.Breakthrough ACTION's provider behavior change toolkits help users understand and prioritize the factors influencing facility-based provider behavior. They guide users through an empathetic process that supports providers, clients, and district health teams in understanding the manifestations and causes of provider behavior challenges. The toolkits position providers as part of the inquiry and solution development process rather than as part of the problem. The toolkits, which are tailored for family planning programs, give stakeholders, providers, and health systems the tools to identify and prioritize the root causes of provider behaviors and generate local solutions. During the panel, Breakthrough ACTION will demonstrate the importance of placing empathy not just at the center of provider behavior change efforts, but also in the process of developing tools that seek to better understand provider behavior. Breakthrough ACTION will showcase the real-life use of an empathy-focused, co-design process used to create, test, and refine the provider behavior change tools in Guyana, Uganda, Kenya, and South Sudan. Breakthrough ACTION will demonstrate how the tools led to new insights in family planning efforts, with the possibility of broader applicability. 
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Karam 4
Multisector Action to Enable Social and Behaviour Change for the Elimination of Schistosomiasis, a Water-Borne Neglected Tropical Disease.
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Research | Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
Speakers
Gilbert Baayenda, The Fred Hollows Foundation
January Zilabumba, Ministry Of Health - Zanzibar
Naomi Caplan, NALA Foundation
Asmro Dessie, NALA Foundation
Moderators
Anouk Gouvras, Global Schistosomiasis Alliance
Willemijn Zaadnoordijk, Merck
Schistosomiasis is a water-borne, neglected tropical disease (NTD), affecting over 200 million people worldwide, causing cognitive impairment and stunting in children, inflammation and organ damage and, if untreated, infertility, liver fibrosis and bladder cancer. People are infected during routine domestic, occupational, and recreational activities, which expose them to infested water. It is linked to lack of access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), involving multiple sectors.The World Health Organization (WHO) roadmap for NTDs 2021-2030 set the target of schistosomiasis elimination as a public health problem by 2030 and interruption of transmission in certain settings. It emphasizes the need for multisectoral planning and coordination across Health, WASH, Education, Agriculture and other sectors and for community engagement and behaviour change to achieve the roadmap 2030 goals.Large-scale treatment interventions for at-risk populations are the cornerstone of efforts to prevent schistosomiasis morbidity. This approach is proven to control schistosomiasis and reduce the prevalence of infections but has not led to elimination. Behaviour change is recognized as a critical component for schistosomiasis elimination, yet it remains under-resourced, and under-implemented. Scale-up of multisectoral coordination mechanisms, bringing together health, education, community engagement, WASH and environmental measures, is crucial to address structural barriers and enable behaviour change. In this panel we will present case studies from Ethiopia, Zanzibar and Uganda and discuss approaches and learnings to implementing multisectoral coordination and community engagement to create an enabling environment for effective behaviour change, within and across communities, for sustainable disease elimination.
WASH Community Action Planning for prevention of schistosomiasis.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Gilbert Baayenda, The Fred Hollows Foundation
Yael Velleman, SCI Foundation
Co-authors :
Hans Mosler , RANAS Ltd
Charles Niwagaba
This pilot project utilised a 3-stage approach to tackling transmission of the parasitic worm infection schistosomiasis in three high prevalence communities in Eastern Uganda.Participatory mapping of water contact sites and associated risk behaviours and exposures (including the presence of disease-transmitting snails)Participatory community action planning to identify behaviour change and other disease control activities that can be carried out by the communityFacilitated joint planning with duty bearers (District Water Office, Regional and National WASH leaders) to increase accountability of service providers and enhance access to water supply and sanitation services.The project is based on the premise that behaviours associated with the transmission of schistosomiasis are deeply embedded in people's lives and livelihoods and that reducing the risk of transmission and exposure will require a different approach to behaviour change. It therefore takes a highly-participatory approach to generate locally relevant, acceptable and appropriate solutions.  The 1-year pilot was designed to create and test the tools and approaches, with the intention of refinement and further scale up at a later stage. Initial indications are that the approach is appreciated by community members and that it has provided granular information on the various risk behaviours and determinants and enabled action planning. Matching information on contact sites, behaviours and snail presence in this innovative way has also enabled the community and the Ministry of Health to focus on the areas with the highest risk.
Towards Elimination of Neglected Tropical Diseases; Call for Expanding the boundary of SBCC in Zanzibar
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
January Zilabumba, Ministry Of Health - Zanzibar
Co-authors :
Fatma Kabole, Ministry Of Health Zanzibar
Mohamed Saleh, Ministry Of Health Zanzibar
Sophie Mohamed, Ministry Of Health Zanzibar
Schistosomiasis is present in 10 out of the 11 health Implementation Units (IUs) across the Zanzibar archipelago. The two islands (Unguja and Pemba) have one common intervention - prevention of schistosomiasis through mass drug administration (MDA). Pemba has also used vector management to control the aquatic snail intermediate host of the schistosome parasite. Neither island has integrated social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) as part of the national programme. Despite 16 rounds of MDA schistosomiasis has rebounded and there are outbreaks and spikes in infection rates. We deep-dived into the massive amount of data qualitatively, looking at schistosomiasis data from the Zanzibar Elimination of Schistosomiasis Transmission (ZEST) study and other schistosomiasis mapping surveys; snail control data by the Chinese counterpart in Pemba and data on access to WASH, launched by UNICEF in 2017 in all districts. These were then compared with the prevalence of schistosomiasis and selected school-aged children as the age group highly affected by schistosomiasis.We reviewed all the comments and challenges aired in several of our meetings on the reasons for the rebound, sharp spikes in prevalence, and new outbreaks in sub-districts that had previously had zero prevalence. Our analysis and discussions concluded that MDA and Vector Control alone would not lead to the elimination of transmission due to the high risk of infection rebound during the surveillance stage. SBCC should be supported by unchaining all enablers to behaviour changes. These enablers are multi-sectoral and beyond the reach of the health sector alone.
A Holistic Approach for Enabling Social and Behavioral Change for Elimination of Schistosomiasis in Ethiopia.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Naomi Caplan, NALA Foundation
Asmro Dessie, NALA Foundation
Co-authors :
Rachel Golan, NALA Foundation
Dorin Turgeman , NALA Foundation
Asrat Meleko , NALA Foundation
To create an environment wherein behavioural change interventions can have impact and be sustained, coordination between sectors at the district level is vital. In 2016, NALA launched its flagship intersectoral coordination program, which focuses on bringing health, water, education, and finance together at all levels of administration to improve the allocation of resources and enable an environment whereby preventative habits can be implemented. Five years on this mechanism has been further adapted and implemented in 250 districts in Ethiopia, with plans for country-wide implementation in the coming few years. This intervention closely compliments NALA's work at the community level whereby communities are understood as individual units, considering the context, culture, disease prevalence and access to Water, Hygiene, and Sanitation (WASH). Mapping communities discreetly enables the creation of appropriate and sensitive tools for behaviour change interventions, ensuring maximum impact. The pairing of community-based interventions and intersectoral coordination aims to ensure the sustainable elimination of schistosomiasis.   In 2016, the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health requested NALA's support in Bench Maji zone due to its high prevalence of Schistosomiasis, despite the delivery of Mass Drug Administration (MDA). Alongside Merck Science and Technology company, NALA delivered WASH-, school- and community-based interventions encouraging community-led behavior change with the aim to reduce schistosomiases prevalence by 80% in all endemic woredas, as well as create a proven model of intense community engagement and education to be adopted by the Ethiopian government, over the course of 5 years.  
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Karam 5
Lessons Learned from COVID-19 Adaptations for Very Young Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Programs
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Infectious disease/COVID | Gender | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Saad Haroon, Rutgers Netherlands
Oonagh Eastmond, Rutgers Netherlands
Kathryn M. Barker, University Of California San Diego
Happy Ncube, Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe
Jennifer Gayles, Save The Children USA
Moderators
Francine Wood, University Of California San Diego, Center For Gender Equity And Health
Gender norms govern the behavior of men and women in society, and often affect behaviors across health domains. Research also suggests that norms may be reinforced during a crisis, for instance, the COVID-19 pandemic. As such, there is a need to ensure continuity in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) during crises and programs need to adapt their strategies, especially for very young adolescents (VYA) - individuals aged 10 – 14 years.To this end, the objective of this panel is to present and discuss the lessons learned from COVID-19 adaptations of VYA SRH programs and advance the knowledge base on effective approaches for reaching this vulnerable and underserved population with critical SRH information and health services during crises such as the pandemic or other humanitarian disasters. Speakers will also share information on various programmatic approaches including using gender-transformative strategies.The panel brings together program implementers and evaluators of VYA SRH programs in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Zimbabwe and multiple other countries in the world. Speakers will share strategies, challenges and lessons learned on (1) a print adaptation of the sports-based SKILLZ Core program in Zimbabwe, (2) a radio and television adaptation of the classroom-based national Family Life Education program from a gender norms-shifting SRH intervention (Growing up Great! program) in DRC, and (3) the Dance4Life program in Indonesia, Pakistan, Ghana, and Kazakhstan.
Sexuality Education in the new normal: Exploring the potential of adapting the Dance4Life empowerment model to the digital environment
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Saad Haroon, Rutgers Netherlands
Oonagh Eastmond, Rutgers Netherlands
During COVID-19, a digital version Dance4Life's innovative empowerment curriculum, Journey4Life was developed and piloted with 5,810 young people in 8 countries. The Journey4Life is designed for adolescents with a unique combination of social and emotional learning and CSE. To study its effectiveness in terms of knowledge, confidence, gender attitudes, and behaviours, an empirical evaluation of the program was done in Indonesia, Pakistan, Ghana, and Kazakhstan.The digitalisation of the Journey4Life consisted of experimentation, testing, adaptation and contextualisation. Findings from a needs assessment in these countries showed young people having access to the internet on their phones and home computers and preferred using online engagement tools such as WhatsApp, Zoom, telegram and Instagram.  Two versions were developed, a junior version for 10-14 year olds and another  for 15-19 year olds.Dance4Life developed a Theory of Change for the digital Journey4Life and a measurement framework with outcomes indicators. Overall, evaluations show that the digital Journey4Life contributes to limited changes in knowledge, confidence, gender equal attitudes and socioemotional learning. Greater benefit of the digital Journey4Life appears to be on gender equality. Young people enjoyed the online sessions but expressed that a digital version lacks in energy and interactiveness as compared to in-person activities.Based on the lessons learned, we aim to develop new behavioural indicators and a further adapted ToC based on how sexuality takes place digitally.  Dance4Life also plans to work on a blended version combining face-to-face and digital sessions and evaluate its impact on long-term outcomes.
Integrated Family Life Education into Distance Learning during COVID-19 Closures in Kinshasa, DRC
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Kathryn M. Barker, University Of California San Diego
Co-authors :
Jennifer Gayles, Save The Children USA
Eric Mafuta, University Of Kinshasa School Of Public Health
Mariam Diakité, University Of California San Diego, Center For Gender Equity And Health
Rebecka Lundgren, University Of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
During the COVID-19 pandemic, the DRC's Ministry of Primary, Secondary and Technical Education adapted core school curricula to TV and radio to enable children's access during school closures. Comprehensive sexual education (known as Family Life Education (FLE)) was initially not included in the broadcasts. In response, Save the Children partnered with DRC's Directorate of Life Skills Education to adapt FLE material from Growing Up GREAT! – a gender norms-shifting SRH intervention for VYAs, ages 10-14 years. A mixed-methods study was conducted to: 1) document how FLE was incorporated into the broadcasts, and 2) understand the experiences and acceptability of the FLE distance learning among adolescents, parents, and implementing partners. Data sources include program monitoring data, survey data from the Global Early Adolescent Study (n=397) and semi-structured individual interviews among 13 adolescents and 12 adults.A total of 64 core and FLE lessons were broadcast a cumulative 192 times on TV and radio. FLE lessons were watched or listened to by 13% of adolescents. Of adolescents who had seen the FLE lessons, almost all reported that it helped them improve their knowledge of: contraceptive methods; prevention of abuse and sexual violence; and gender-equitable behaviors. Access to televised programs was more prevalent among boys than girls. Electrical outages were the biggest barrier to viewership. Broadcasts on FLE topics are a feasible and acceptable mode of education in the urban DRC context. This approach may be a useful mode of education in times of crisis-related school closures
Utilizing alternative platforms in SRHR programming during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zimbabwe: Grassroot Soccer SKILLZ Magazines
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Happy Ncube, Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe
Co-authors :
Blessed Gumbi, Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe
Primrose Dube, Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe
Devyn Lee, Grassroot Soccer, Inc.
Kenneth Bhauti, Grassroot Soccer, Inc.
Jeff DeCelles, Grassroot Soccer, Inc.
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Grassroot Soccer (GRS) was forced to adapt regular sport-based group SRH programming for adolescents. GRS programming uses evidence-based health curricula known as 'SKILLZ' which uses soccer language and activities to convey key health messages. Trained young adult 'Coaches' from the community usually deliver SKILLZ interventions to groups of 20-25 adolescents at schools and other venues. Given the limited access that VYAs aged 10-14 have to mobile phones and networks in Zimbabwe, mobile phone-based programming was not an option to respond to COVID-19 restrictions. Instead, GRS developed a youth-friendly comic-book style SKILLZ Magazine to continue reaching VYAs with key SRH curriculum information and written activities.Coaches delivered magazines to adolescent participants individually at their homes, and visited each participant at least three times over three months to complete the intervention. Pre/post tests administered to 10% of participants showed greater overall improvement among magazine participants in 2020 and 2021 compared to in-person group participants in 2020. The cost per 'graduate' for SKILLZ Core Magazines was $5.92, comparable to that of regular interventions ($5.35). The 1:1 delivery of the magazine-based programming allowed more personal interactions between Coaches and participants, and parents reported discussing program topics with their children and other family members. The development of the SKILLZ Core Magazine not only allowed GRS to continue to reach participants during pandemic restrictions but gave adolescents an enduring resource to refer to as questions arise during their development. 
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Reda 1
Transforming Provider Behavior
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Inclusion | Nutrition | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Ronald Del Castillo, UN World Food Programme Philippines
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Rachel Granovsky, The University Of California, San Francisco
Moderators
Abdel Agadazi, Camber Collective
Adapting and Validating the G-NORM (Gender Norms Scale) in Nepal: An Examination of How Gender Norms are Associated with Sexual and Reproductive Health Outcomes
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Rachel Granovsky, The University Of California, San Francisco
Co-authors :
Erica Sedlander, University Of California, San Francisco
Minakshi Dahal, Center For Research On Environment, Health, And Population Activities
Jeffrey Bingenheimer, The George Washington University
Mahesh Puri, Center For Research On Environment, Health, And Population Activities
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Nadia Diamond-Smith, The University Of California San Francisco
Recent research calls for the sexual and reproductive rights field to prioritize changing gender norms to ensure that women can act on their reproductive rights. However, despite this professed commitment to global gender equality, there still remains a notable gap in accepted methodologies for measurement and data. We sought to resolve this issue by addressing important missing theoretical components of gender norms measures, including differentiating between descriptive and injunctive norms and adding a referent group. Our team originally developed and validated The Gender Norms (G-NORM) scale in India. In this paper, we describe how we subsequently adapted and validated it in Nepal. After analyzing qualitative data, we administered all items to women of reproductive age. We conducted psychometric testing including exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and construct validity- associations with theoretically relevant scales. Like the original G-NORM, exploratory factor analysis showed a two-factor structure, descriptive norms and injunctive norms, with high alphas for both subscales (0.92, 0.89). Fit statistics showed that our model fit the data well and as hypothesized, more equitable gender norms were associated with having higher scores on the decision-making scale, increased odds of intending to use family planning, and older ideal age at marriage. These findings can contribute to greater theoretical consistency in the social norms literature, provide an improved measure of gender norms in Nepal, and add to the body of evidence that gender norms are critical to consider for both agency and reproductive health outcomes.
Using SBC to Respond to Health Care Provider Priorities and Improve Provider Experience: Cross-Cutting Insights from Nigeria, Madagascar, and Zambia
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Emily Zimmerman, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Faraz Haqqi, Ideas42
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Health care providers are critical to quality service delivery. In addition to delivering SBC interventions, they are increasingly targeted by interventions to support compliance with good practice. However, SBC remains under-explored as an approach to improve providers' experience in service delivery and respond to their priorities, which can have direct and indirect effects on quality of care. Innovative behavioral solutions require nuanced understanding of the provider's experience, including the psychological and contextual drivers shaping their choices and the influence of time and resource constraints on factors such as perceived agency, motivation, and task prioritization. We have applied the behavioral design approach to health provider behavior across a variety of contexts, developing tailored solutions through collaborative and iterative design and testing processes with providers and other stakeholders. This presentation will include examples related to malaria diagnosis and treatment, prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage, provision of respectful maternity care, and care for childhood illnesses. Several cross-cutting behavioral insights have emerged from our work which directly informed the design of innovative and context-specific solutions. These tested solutions aim to make it easier for providers to comply with clinical protocol, minimize the perceived trade-offs of adherence, provide alternatives to further their goals, and to build empathy and alleviate pressures. Behavioral solutions have the potential to not only improve quality of care, but also to address elements of the provider experience that can contribute to burnout and low motivation, thereby strengthening the capacity and resilience of the health workforce.
Food and Nutrition Frontline Workers’ Emotional and Psychological Exhaustion and Perceived Neglect
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Ronald Del Castillo, UN World Food Programme Philippines
Village workers, such as nutritionist-dietitians and health volunteers, are a pillar of the country's zero-hunger initiatives. However, while their roles and responsibilities are well considered in research, programming, and policymaking, their emotional and psychological wellbeing are less understood. In 2021, WFP Philippines evaluated these determinants as part of a broader program in social and behavior change communication. The SBCC project targeted nine groups, including key stakeholders, such as village workers. These workers are the focus of this abstract. From four municipalities with known chronic malnutrition, 15 workers were purposively invited for in-depth interviews, in-person or over the phone. To explore if and how their thoughts and feelings about public service might be linked to how they experience their work in the field, thematic analysis examined relationships among possible themes and clusters of possible meanings. Two themes emerged. For one, village workers described persistent emotional and psychological exhaustion as well as feelings of neglect or being left behind. For another, this burnout appeared linked to their negative views of behavior change among the families they helped. Village workers are especially essential. However, despite evidence that emotional and psychological wellbeing indeed have sizable impact on job performance and job satisfaction, there remains an overemphasis on developing skills in how to do job and less on how workers experience that job. Emotions and empathy have a role in programming and policymaking but, as evidenced by these interviews, are neglected. 
Beyond Provider Attitudes About Family Planning: What Other Provider Attitudes are Relevant to Improve Family Planning Services?
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Amanda Kalamar, Breakthrough RESEARCH
Co-authors :
Kathryn Spielman, Population Council
Martha Silva, Tulane University / Population Council
Provider attitudes limiting family planning (FP) provision to certain groups, such as unmarried or nulliparous women have been found in a variety of settings, inhibiting informed choice and contraceptive access when acted upon. Factors such as providers' personal values, cultural norms, empathy for clients, and perceptions of their role as providers can shape provider attitudes toward clients or services. This study sought to understand whether healthcare provider attitudes across three domains: 1) perceptions of their roles as providers, 2) perceptions of their clients, and 3) gender norms are related to beliefs about FP provision. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 52 family planning providers sampled from urban health facilities in Togo. Provider attitudes, based on three subscales developed under the Breakthrough RESEARCH project, were assessed. Beliefs regarding obligations of FP service provision were also assessed based on agreement with statements such as, "I should NOT have to provide family planning service to unmarried women and girls." Univariable and multivariable linear regressions of FP attitudes on each provider attitude subscale, adjusting for provider gender, years of experience as a provider and at the facility, training, and managerial status, were conducted. Favorable/equitable provider attitudes related to perceptions of their professional roles, their clients, and gender norms, were significantly associated with more equitable FP service provision beliefs. Provider behavior change programming should seek to address other influences on providers, such as gender norms, attitudes about clients, and explore norms in provider training and management.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Reda 2
Improving Educational Outcomes Through SBC
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Children | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Catherine Kennedy , Save The Children USA
Brian Pedersen, FHI360
Margaret Andersen, J-PAL Global
Samuel Wolf, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Stephanie McBride, Save The Children Canada
Moderators
Dawn Murdock, Episcopal Relief & Development
Girls’ Voices on Empowerment Through Education: Case Studies from Colombia, DRC, and Nigeria
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Stephanie McBride, Save The Children Canada
Co-authors :
Deanna Del Vecchio
Empowerment is a difficult concept to communicate, especially across cultures. It is a process and an outcome; it is personal and political; and the feeling of "being empowered" can look completely different from person to person. Save the Children Canada (SCC) is currently implementing education projects for crisis-affected girls and boys aged 5 to 18 in Colombia, DRC, and Nigeria, with funding from Global Affairs Canada. To contribute to global evidence on girls' education in crisis-affected contexts and girls' empowerment, SCC is implementing a Learning Agenda. This Learning Agenda puts our innovative Girls' Power Index at the centre, assessing girls' empowerment across a range of domains through focus group discussions and surveys. These findings have led to the development of a report, "Girls' Voices on Empowerment," which helps shapes our understanding of and approaches to SBCC programming on girls' empowerment and to explore the barriers and enablers within girls' education programs, as well as centering the voices of girls and contributing to girl-led advocacy. Findings validate that many girls understand the importance of education for their personal growth, success, and independence. Most identified a considerable number of contextual, socio-cultural, and economic barriers that hindered their education. The report provides a platform for understanding how the pandemic is affecting girls' empowerment and how we can adapt SBCC programming to meet those needs, such as transforming parental attitudes towards early marriage and teacher's attitudes toward positive discipline.   
Health Interventions to Improve Education Outcomes: A Global and Cross-Cutting Evidence Review
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Samuel Wolf, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Margaret Andersen, J-PAL Global
Many children are struggling to master basic skills in reading and math despite a dramatic rise in school enrollment around the world. For instance, India's 2018 Annual Status of Education Report found that only about half of all grade 5 students in rural India could read a grade 2 text. Assessments showed similar results in other countries, from Malawi to Nicaragua to Zambia, and Covid-related school closures have only worsened this problem.Especially in low- and middle-income countries, poor health is often a key barrier that students must overcome in order to be able to learn. The health of schoolchildren may fall through the cracks of government systems in which education departments focus on pedagogy and school infrastructure, while health departments focus on health workers and medical infrastructure. Improving the coordination between health and education systems could address this gap. School-based health interventions have been effective at increasing learning outcomes, and many can be delivered at a low cost, although the relative cost-effectiveness varies depending on the specific approach and context. Results from eight randomized evaluations in Burkina Faso, China, Kenya, and the United States show that health interventions delivered at schools can improve student health and positively affect learning outcomes. This presentation will deliver an overview of these interventions, highlighting cases where they were effective and ineffective at improving both health and learning, as well as potential lessons for scalability. 
Identifying Individual and Structural Factors Influencing the Application of Student-Centered Learning Practices by Secondary School Teachers in Morocco
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Brian Pedersen, FHI360
Co-authors :
Orlando Hernandez, IBTCI
Yvonne Cao, FIH 360
Michelle Inkley, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Alison Montgomery, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Kimberly Boland, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Isabel Dillener, MCC
Gwendolyn Morgan, IBTCI
The Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) partners with governments to foster economic growth through targeted investments in infrastructure, land reform, health, agriculture, and education, among other sectors. Recognizing the importance of social and behavior change (SBC) to an investment's success, MCC's Human and Community Development Practice applies a standard social and behavior change model to contribute to the design phase of MCC investments. In Morocco, MCC applied this model to identify individual and structural factors influencing the application of student-centered (SLC) practices by secondary school teachers who may participate in a planning teacher training program. This presentation describes the research approach applied to identify which factors were most strongly associated with the desired behavior and how these findings strengthen the content of the teacher training program. Findings suggest that a majority of secondary school teachers in Morocco do not apply SCL practices in the classroom. Two sub-constructs from the MCC SBC Model, Perceived Relevance and Habit, were significantly associated with the desired behavior. Perceived Relevance of SCL practices was positively associated while Habit was negatively associated with their application by individual teachers. While qualitative data suggested awareness and positive attitudes were high among teachers, respondents indicated that lack of student motivation and ability, support from inspectors and parents, availability of equipment and technology, class size, and classroom physical environment were also important factors influencing teachers' application of SCL practices.
The Elephant in the Room: Using Influential Principles and an Emotional Drivers Approach to Reduce Violence by Teachers in School: The Commitments Project, Uganda
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Catherine Kennedy , Save The Children USA
Co-authors :
Jasmine Uysal, UCSD
Violence in schools is a long-standing, global issue. The banning of corporal punishment and conventional information-sharing approaches have had little impact on reducing it. SBC, relatively new to the education sector, has the potential to be more effective. Save the Children has developed and piloted 'Commitments' - an SBC approach, using Cialdini's 'Influence Principles' and 'Emotional Drivers' - to challenge harmful teacher behaviours and norms, focusing on humiliating language, corporal punishment and sexual abuse. Two interventions were tested: a school-based teacher workshop model consisting of eight 40 minute reflections sessions; and a 6 month, online peer chat group, 'Everyday Heroes', housed on WhatsApp, where project administrators posted community testimony and 'conversation starters' to stimulate discussion.  The Center on Gender Equity and Health at University of California, San Diego provided technical assistance to Ugandan research partner, The Applied Research Burea, to monitor project implementation and adaptations due to COVID 19, and to conduct an evaluation. Whilst the endline survey was severely hampered by school closures as a result of COVID-19, (10% retention), data gathered through the evaluation did reveal that both the school-based workshops and the online chat groups have the potentional to shift teacher norms and behaviours in school. The pilot provides concrete recommendations on how to implement SBC education initiatives in ways that are feasible, acceptable and effective among teachers to shift norms around teachers' use of violence in their relations with students. 
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Reda 4
The Dirty Truth: Scaling Up Strategies to Improve WASH Outcomes
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Entertainment Education | Nutrition | Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
Speakers
Md. Ariful Islam, SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
Rishika Das Roy, Oxford Policy Management
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Kalkidan Gugsa, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Suruchi Sood, Drexel University
Moderators
Cathy Stephen, Sightsavers
Using Global Evaluation Criteria to Measure SBCC Program Success
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Suruchi Sood, Drexel University
In India, adequate menstrual hygiene management (MHM) is impeded by diverse issues. GARIMA is an SBCC initiative from Uttar Pradesh, India that aimed to increase dialogue on menstruation, address related norms and restrictions, and foster an environment where girls can practice adequate MHM with dignity. Using a social-ecological perspective, GARIMA included adolescent girls and their mothers as primary audiences and fathers, health workers, and teachers as secondary audiences. GARIMA was implemented in 1,975 villages reaching 64,000 girls. Mixed methods evaluation was based on OECD-DAC criteria. Quantitative structured interviews using an intervention-comparison design included programme beneficiaries (n = 2,289) and implementers (n = 315) matched with comparison group respondents (n = 2,370 and n = 212, respectively). GARIMA established relevance by complementing governmental infrastructural efforts. Effectiveness was established through significant direct and indirect positive effects and, while causal attribution is hard to determine, potential impact was seen through significantly higher adequate MHM behaviors among intervention respondents. Efficiency was assessed by evaluating the processes of local partners implementing activities using a standardized package of SBCC materials. Sustainability was evident from the integration of GARIMA within national and regional government initiatives. Dialogue remained concentrated at same-sex family and peer levels and reasons and expectancies for actions were not articulated, suggesting norm internalization. However, GARIMA empowered adolescents to voice actions around sexual harassment, child marriage, and education. Adolescent girls' groups expanded social networks, increased social capital, and trained a cadre of peer educators and health workers as change agents.
Baby WASH in Ethiopia: Tackling Open Defecation, Stunting and Early Child Development Through Multimedia Social and Behavior Change Interventions.
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Kalkidan Gugsa, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
As part of the integrated early childhood development approach, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) initiated an evidence-based program in 2017 known as Baby WASH to reduce the number of babies and young children's unhygienic interaction and microbial burden in play and feeding environments. Baby WASH is a set of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene interventions that focus on pregnant women, babies and children under 3 years and their parents, including the safe disposal of child feces, protective hygienic play, handwashing with soap refocused on the child's hands, food hygiene, safe water management and reduction of soil-transmitted helminths. Nutrition-sensitive interventions are a critical component of WASH programming to mitigate stunting.Informed by formative research, the SBCC intervention used a multi-media approach to reach the rural population. An interactive magazine radio program that has a drama segment was produced and broadcast in local languages. Media dark areas and the underserved population were reached through the establishment of listener clubs that facilitate discussion based on content broadcasted. Interpersonal tools were developed and used by community workers to support interpersonal communication. The result is that there has been changed in knowledge and practice around WASH practices such as handwashing at critical moments, use of potties, and creating a safe play environment for children. The intervention is believed to have a multisectoral outcome by contributing to reducing stunting, improving child's health and wellbeing, and improving sanitation practices in general.
Talking 'Shit': Lessons on Entertainment Education from an Urban Sanitation Drama
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Rishika Das Roy, Oxford Policy Management
Co-authors :
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Tom Newton-Lewis, FHI360
There is an emerging body of research evaluating the effectiveness of 'edutainment' interventions. This paper presents the results of a mixed methods evaluation of 'Navrangi Re!', a 26-episode television drama aired in India in 2019 (and now a web-series in 2022), evaluated by Oxford Policy Management (OPM), funded by BMGF and created by BBC Media Action. It aimed to influence Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) behaviours through changing knowledge, attitudes, increasing risk perception, stimulating conversations, building collective-efficacy, and creating social disapproval against poor faecal sludge management practices. The quasi-experimental evaluation compares changes in outcomes of those exposed to the TV show with the unexposed, This confirms that an edutainment intervention can be a successful behavioural change communication strategy for FSM.The results from this evaluation have been published in a peer-reviewed journal http://jdc.journals.unisel.edu.my/ojs/index.php/jdc/article/view/208. FSM has traditionally been seen as an infrastructure issue with its demand-side concerns unexplored. Inadequate FSM disproportionately impacts low income, high density urban settlements in India but has received relatively little policy focus. OPM employed a quasi-experimental, panel-based approach for evaluation using difference-in-difference analysis as part of a broader mixed methods evaluation. Educational entertainment (EE) TV shows are challenging to evaluate as everyone with a TV set can watch them, but baseline surveys have to be undertaken before it is known who will actually watch the show. This creates practical challenges and risks (whilst also introducing the risk of self-selection bias).
Branding Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) Services: Creating Desire and Demand for Safe Sanitation at Jashore Municipality in Bangladesh
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Md. Ariful Islam, SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
Co-authors :
Marc Pérez Casas, SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Reda 5
Tackling Disability Stigma Using SBC
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Children | Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Kaushiki Ghose, BBC MediaAction
Andrew Carlson, Metropolitan State University
Cathy Stephen, Sightsavers
Effectiveness of Interventions to Tackle Stigma of People with Disabilities in Sub-Sharan Africa and Three South Asia countries: a Systematic Review
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Cathy Stephen, Sightsavers
Conduct of a Baseline Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices Study in Support of a C4D Strategy for ECD and Children with Developmental Delays and Disabilities in the State of Palestine
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Andrew Carlson, Metropolitan State University
This study informed the development of an SBC strategy for UNICEF State of Palestine that will promote Early Childhood Development (ECD) behaviours, increase demand for services among parents/caregivers of children with developmental delays and disabilities, and provide parents/caregivers with the knowledge, beliefs, and skills they need to confront stigma and discrimination when it occurs in their communities. Building on previous research and reports, the report provides baseline data for a multi-year SBC strategy around ECD and children with developmental delays and disabilities.The research used three methods of inquiry: a quantitative study, representative of the entire population of Gaza and the three governates of Hebron, Jericho, and Nablus in the West Bank; a qualitative study which included Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) in both Gaza and the West Bank; and participatory activities, which were conducted with youth with developmental delays and disabilities ages 10-15 in both Gaza and the West Bank and parents/caregivers in each region. In addition to a review of literature, the study proposed the use of a theoretical framework, the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) that would inform the development of a C4D strategy as a final step in a multi-step process to promote positive change for children with developmental delays and disabilities and their family parents/caregivers in Palestine. The three main concepts in this framework – attitudes, normative expectations, and self-efficacy – informed the design of the quantitative survey instrument and were further explored in the qualitative inquiry. 
Inclusion of Children with Disabilities - Lebanon's Experience
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Lea Asfour, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Only one of four respondents in Lebanon thought that children with intellectual disabilities should be integrated into society (three in four for physical disabilities). The underpinning behavioral and attitude change was therefore deemed as a necessary step to create an enabling environment for people with disabilities. UNICEF developed an SBC strategy that is based on the socio-ecological model and equips key stakeholders with essential tools to promote positive attitudes and behaviors on inclusion. Through the roll out of this strategy, connecting the dots for collective action was possible through co-design and co-creation with key stakeholders. For the past 3 years, UNICEF partnered with 6 organizations; 5 specialized organizations to provide services to children with moderate and severe disabilities and 1 local organization with established ties in the community to focus on outreach and referral. Each of these organizations design context-specific set of SBC initiatives to be further planned and implement with key stakeholders in the community including local authorities, universities, local activists, artists, service-providers and many more, hence signifying that inclusion concerns everyone. So far, around 250,000 people have been engaged/reached through these SBC activities with key messages on inclusion with partners using many innovative tools, especially during COVID-19. To capture attitudinal change in the people targeted, an impact evaluation in the form of pre-post test mixed method research is being conducted and will be finalized in July 2022. The results will inform future programming and will be included in the final presentation.
Using Radio Drama to Tackle Disability Discrimination in Nigeria
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Presented by :
Kaushiki Ghose, BBC MediaAction
Co-authors :
Folashade Akashoro-Dimaro, BBC Media Action/Nigeria
Alasdair Stuart, BBC Media Action
04:00PM - 05:15PM
Anfa (Mogador)
Regional Space
06:30PM - 08:30PM
Outside Pool Area (Movenpick)
Opening Reception
Tuesday, Day 2, Dec 06, 2022
07:00AM - 09:00AM
Aux sessions coming soon!
Format : Auxiliary Event
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 2
Challenging Collective Norms, A New Look at Old Norms, Challenging Accepted Norms
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Gender | Inclusion | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Sonali Wayal, Development Media International
Celso Give, Development Media International Mozambique
Anne Taiwo, Marie Stopes International Organisation Nigeria
Mariama Maizama, Save The Children
Moderators
Fatima Tambadou-Diallo, Equipop
Engager les hommes dans le changement d’attitudes autour du mariage des enfants à travers deux approches : Influenceurs Communautaires et Ecoles des Maris
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Mariama Maizama, Save The Children
Save the Children en partenariat avec NCBA CLUSA, The Kaizen Company et DEMI-E, implémente un programme de Résilience et Sécurité Alimentaire dénommé RFSA Wadata dans la région de Zinder au Niger sous le financement du gouvernement américain.  Un des sous résultats est d'augmenter l'engagement des hommes en faveur de la santé et du bien-être des femmes et des enfants. C'est sous cet angle que le problème du mariage précoce, avec un âge moyen du mariage dans la zone d'intervention de 15,5 ans, est retenu comme un axe d'intervention où Wadata a pensé à des structures spécifiques pour mener le travail. Même si de nombreuses filles mariées, leurs parents et leurs maris ont estimé qu'elles avaient leur mot à dire ensemble avec les parents dans la décision de se marier, surtout sur le choix d'époux, le moment de leur mariage n'était pas fortement déterminé par elles. La plupart des répondants ont estimé que c'était le père qui avait le plus d'influence sur la décision. Bien que les deux parents soient influents, si les parents ne sont pas d'accord sur le mariage de leur fille, la décision et la volonté du père sont respectées. Dans un contexte où les hommes sont les décideurs finals sur le mariage, Wadata a développé une alliance d'approches (influenceurs communautaires et Ecoles des Maris) dont les acteurs sont les cibles prioritaires ou segments appropriés pour changer les attitudes et pratiques sur le mariage précoce.
Inclusive Community Engagement for Ending Child Early and Forced Marriages: A Case in Malawi
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Irene Banda, Save The Children
Nancy Kamwaza, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Lovemore Magombo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Jimmy Ndoya, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Alfred Mang'ando, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Breakthrough ACTION Malawi is working to change the mindset of community members and spark a social movement to prevent and stop child, early and forced marriages (CEFM). The project implements activities for community members at a number of levels, including adolescents, their caregivers and the community at large to create a supportive environment ready for change. Adolescents are engaged through clubs, where they learn life skills as well as advocacy methods to speak up for their rights. Caregivers and parents are engaged through the Responsible, Engaged and Loving (REAL) father approach, which encourages fathers to play an active role in their children's lives and emphasizes the importance of education and positive discipline. At the community level, the Community Action Cycle (CAC) is implemented; adults and youths are combined to form 20 Community Action Groups (CAGs) and engage in community-level advocacy. In the first year of the project 1,809 adolescent girls, 1,207 adolescent boys, 1,000 caregivers, and 400 community members participated as members of the CAGs. As a result, 269 out of 401 children identified were withdrawn from marriage within 12 months of active advocacy and 133 of these were re-enrolled in formal school. Additionally, 149 potential child marriages were averted. Engaging all levels of community members through focused approaches ensures a more holistic and complementary approach with more sustainable outcomes. This is what separates this project from many other projects. This strategy is recommended for any project focusing on social behavior change or for creating a social movement.
‘Gagarabadau’: Challenging negative community norms by engaging local business owners to become supporters of family planning in Northern Nigeria
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Anne Taiwo, Marie Stopes International Organisation Nigeria
Marie Stopes International Organisation Nigeria (MSION) piloted a suite of interventions aimed at increasing male engagement with and support for child-spacing in Northern Nigeria. Using human-centred design HCD), a tea vendor business kit, peer to peer conversion and infusion of the word 'Gagarabadau' were designed to shift social norms around what drives respect among men, (i.e. from having lots of children to men who take care of their children), and increasing the role of women in family decision-making and income generation.MSION used CARE's SNAP (social norms analysis plot) methodology to break down the social norms the interventions were seeking to address to inform both the intervention approach and subsequent qualitative evaluation of the pilot phase. Insights from this evaluation suggest activities were able to start to successfully challenge and overcome key social norms undermining women's access to family planning (FP) through increasing positive dialogue and messaging via community champions. 
Developing a culturally appropriate, gender sensitive, mass media campaign to promote timely Tuberculosis diagnoses among adults in the province of Zambezia, Mozambique
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Celso Give, Development Media International Mozambique
Sonali Wayal, Development Media International
Co-authors :
Joanna Murray, Development Media International
Tuberculosis (TB) accounts for a high burden of deaths, especially in LMICs. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on timely diagnosis and treatment of new TB cases. In LMICs with a high TB burden, it is estimated the pandemic will result in a 20% increase in TB deaths between 2020-2024. Thus, TB case finding, notification, and treatment is a global priority. Mass media campaigns providing information about TB symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and available treatment, can enhance timely TB diagnosis. We conducted formative research in Mozambique, which has a high burden of TB, to inform the development of a media campaign to promote TB testing. We interviewed nineteen community members, two TB Program staff, and two community providers of TB services, from four districts in Zambezia with a high TB prevalence.  We explored TB-related knowledge, and barriers and facilitators to TB testing. Results indicate that healthcare-seeking for TB is influenced by sociocultural understanding of symptoms and gender dynamics. Sociocultural beliefs often implicate certain types of sexual activity and women as causes of TB symptoms; for example, having sex with a widow who has not been traditionally purified. People usually tend to first seek care from traditional healers instead of from health centres due to such beliefs, and because of long distances and opportunity costs of travelling to health facilities. Some women have limited healthcare access because they usually lack decisionmaking power and financial independence. Some male participants perceive that men have limited access to healthcare. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Fes 2a
Gender in the Media
Format : Panel Presentation
Session information coming soon!
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Aud des Ministres
Gamification of Learning for Nutrition, Digital Literacy, and Reproductive Health
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Nutrition | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Donald Eastwood, Bridge
Nisha Shah-Sanghvi, Khanga Rue
Jessica Massie, UNCDF
Oonagh Eastmond, Rutgers Netherlands
Moderators
Kristina Granger, United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
The Academy4Life: an engaging digital platform for young SRHR trainers and advocates
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Oonagh Eastmond, Rutgers Netherlands
The Academy4Life is an online learning platform that builds young people's personal and professional competencies. It helps them feel confident to contribute to foster positive Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in society. By moving learning online, making it accessible by laptop or smartphone or even an interactive download, the platform facilitates learning and promote youth leadership in a time and cost-efficient manner, allowing participants to learn where and when it suits them best.The Academy4Life targets specifically young trainers and advocates willing to pursue their career in the field of SRHR. It is an engaging platform that provides a transformational experience. Every part of the platform has been co-created by and for young people across the globe. It mixes gamified experiences, interactive multimedia modules, tailor-made content and mentoring, and applied learning through real-life cases. Current modules include: Public speaking, Effective influencing, Gender & power dynamics, Meaningful and inclusive youth participation and Career development. Modules are tailored to each new user group. Besides the online course, young trainers and advocates also join a community of young learners where they further empower and personally develop.The Academy4Life has higher completion rates than other e-learning platforms: in 2021, the average completion rate of the 3-month Academy4Life for advocates stands at 78%; 91% of participants found the format more useful than traditional online learning.
Building Financial and Digital Literacy in Refugee and Host Communities through Interactive Tech
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Jessica Massie, UNCDF
Nisha Shah-Sanghvi, Khanga Rue
UNCDF offers last mile finance models to reduce poverty and support local economic development. To reach the "last mile", where available resources are scarcest and market failures are most pronounced, UNCDF Tanzania partnered in 2019 with KhangaRue Media and the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics to develop a gamified app called Lenga. Lenga teaches users about money management, saving, loans, and formal financial services (including digital financial services) through interactive quizzes and entertaining videos. Based on a baseline study that identified the highest priority gaps in financial and digital literacy in the target populations, the app was designed, tested, and rolled out in Rwanda as part of the REFAD program complemented with financial services and savings groups (including digitized savings groups) and targeting refugee and host communities throughout the country. This session will showcase the participatory approach used to design a tech-based curriculum focused on building key knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors for increased financial and digital capability for vulnerable populations as well as the app itself. Lenga has been launched and used in Rwanda since 2020 and is planned for use in Tanzania in 2022.
6 Months: Just breastmilk (revisited)
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Donald Eastwood, Bridge
In early 2020 we were accepted to attend the SBCC Summit. It was to present the use of integrated brand campaigns for SBCC.When selling a product, are we not trying to change behaviours? New products mean new habits, from starting to smoke, to buying a 4x4, or using breast milk substitutes (BMS). What should SBCC practitioners take from the integrated brand campaigns? What should we leave? And how can we compete with their big budget, multi-channel approaches?Save the Children, UNICEF, Alive & Thrive and Bridge encountered such a challenge when uniting to counter the growth of breast milk substitute marketing and adoption in Myanmar.We introduce our award-winning  integrated campaign for exclusive breastfeeding through influencer learning games on film from 2019. We were to discuss the in-app gamified learning, behaviour change interventions, social media and PR campaign, media and commercial partnerships and data model from longitudinal tests over mothers engaged by the integrated campaign over 6 months, and quantitative testing partly modelled on brand saliency 'pulse tests'. Branding connected these personal, community and mass-media SBCC dots, facilitated private sector, further development organisations and government involvement.But when the dots moved through COVID-19 and the 2021 military coup. The government was boycotted, social media and independent media banned and many development partners left. The journey the brand has taken to persevere in this new context, and the importance of its shared ownership and capacity to adapt will be our principal topic.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Aud des Ambassadeurs
Multimedia Approaches to COVID-19 Prevention
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Entertainment Education
Speakers
Javier Elkin, World Health Organization
Brian Yau, World Health Organization
Enriqueta Valdez-Curiel, University Of Guadalajara
Huyen Hoang, Vietnam Institute Of Occupational And Environmental Health
Moderators
Virginia Williams, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Ghen CoV: A collaborative social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) campaign in response to the COVID-19 pandemic
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Huyen Hoang, Vietnam Institute Of Occupational And Environmental Health
Ghen CoV (Ghen Cô Vy) is a collaborative social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) campaign to engage and empower the community in Vietnam in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. When the first cases of COVID-19 were reported in Vietnam in January 2020, arguments between experts and fears among the public in Vietnam and other countries began to arise. Creating awareness and communicating uncertainties in a clear, empowering, and scientifical way emerged as a priority. By applying a human-centered approach to communicate risks, build trust, and empower citizens with accurate scientific information, the integrated Ghen CoV campaign was launched to the public after 15 days of planning and producing. The project includes the song "Ghen Co Vy" in multiple languages, the animated video "Ghen Co Vy," and the handwashing dance challenge #ghencovychallenge #handwashingmove #vudieuruatay delivered through a combination of traditional media and social media platforms such as YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram. All contents feature basic scientific knowledge of the disease and calls to action for individuals to practice good personal hygiene habits to reduce the risk of acquiring COVID-19. Despite the limited human, financial, and time resources, the campaign, which was the result of collaborations between multiple partners, has achieved national and global community engagements.
Si toca salir, toca cuidarse: campaña radial bilingüe (Español-Ixil) de prevención del COVID-19 en Guatemala, con formato de Educación-Entretenimiento.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Enriqueta Valdez-Curiel, University Of Guadalajara
Co-authors :
Miguel Brito, HC3 Guatemala
Patricia Poppe, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
En la zona Ixil del Departamento de Quiché, en Guatemala, la epidemia de COVID-19 es conocida popularmente como la epidemia del Coronavirus. Así como el nombre asignado a la enfermedad no corresponde en su totalidad a la realidad, tampoco lo hicieron una serie de usos y costumbres que afectaron la prevención del contagio y enfermedad. Para contrarrestar la información falsa se crearon 48 spots radiales con técnica de Educación-Entretenimiento, en español e ixil, que presentan escenas cotidianas de riesgo de contagio de COVID-19 en la comunidad. Cada mensaje problematiza y resuelve una situación concreta de riesgo y prevención de COVID-19.
Serious game intervention based on the theories of behavior change to build resilience against health misinformation and boost a user’s ability to engage in open, non-polarizing conversations with close connections
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Brian Yau, World Health Organization
Javier Elkin, World Health Organization
Co-authors :
Sandra Machiri, African Field Epidemiology Network
Catherine Bertrand-Ferrandis, OLYLO
Atsuyoshi Ishizumi, World Health Organization
Derrick Muneene, World Health Organization
Shanthi Pal, World Health Organisation
Tim Nguyen, World Health Organization
Tina Purnat, World Health Organization
Health misinformation circulates not just online but is spread offline in communities between social groups and amongst our close connections. It has always been a public health challenge, but its harmful impact has increased over the years by the infodemic, described as an overwhelming amount of information, some accurate and some not, including misinformation, all of which makes it difficult for people to find reliable health information to better protect themselves and their loved ones.Although the supply of COVID-19 vaccines has grown substantially in the past year, the Infodemic, including mis- and disinformation, has continued to affect vaccine confidence, a major operational threat to high COVID-19 uptake leading to more than 80% of Ministries of Health reporting that they are tracking COVID-19 misinformation. Vaccine confidence can be protected by ensuring misinformation and information voids are quickly detected and addressed, and that the benefits and safety of vaccines is promoted through trusted messengers and networks.In response, WHO and others have called for a whole of society, evidence-based response to the Infodemic. It includes using approaches and interventions that promote resilience to health misinformation and techniques for pandemic prevention.This study aims to assess the efficacy of a behaviorally-informed, digital serious game intervention that trains people in having conversations about vaccines and to create a supportive environment for healthy behaviors. By increasing self-efficacy, the game improves engagement with close connections in COVID-19 conversations, in a manner that is not polarising and is supportive of opposing viewpoints.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 1
Masculinity and Male Engagement
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Entertainment Education | Gender | Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Research
Speakers
Wanjiru Mathenge, IPPF
Farah Atia, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Evelyn Lehrer, Men's Story Project
Moderators
Dominick Shattuck, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
The Men's Story Project: Men Taking a Personal, Public Stand for Healthy Masculinities & Gender Justice
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Evelyn Lehrer, Men's Story Project
This presentation will share the work and evaluation findings of the Men's Story Project (MSP), and principles for engaging men in personal, public storytelling for intersectional gender justice.Founded in California in 2008, the MSP is an innovative movement-building project for healthy masculinities. Rooted in interdisciplinary research, the MSP helps groups create live productions in which diverse men publicly share bold, personal stories that examine social ideas about masculinity - so as to promote health and equality for people of all genders. The live events are filmed to create locally-relevant social media, films and educational tools.In each MSP production, the presenters share candid personal stories with a live audience - on topics such as family and romantic relationships, gender-based violence, HIV/AIDS, bullying, LGBTQ+ issues, mental health, journeys of personal change, and intersections with race/ethnicity and other aspects of identity. The presenters employ diverse mediums (e.g., prose, poetry, music, dance, comedy, visual art), followed by audience dialogue and a resource fair. MSP presenters have included students, artists, athletes, veterans and others. The MSP aims to be a feminist, intersectional, anti-racist, gender-transformative initiative.40+ live MSP productions have taken place in the U.S., Chile, Canada, Gaza Strip and West Bank, in partnership with universities and civil society organizations. The MSP is structured for local implementation and adaptation, and can be integrated with other gender-transformative programs. Implementing groups receive training - including on harm prevention, accountability, and how to support men in crafting their stories for social change. 
Harnessing Male Engagement for Transformational Gender Behavior Change in Upper Egypt
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Farah Atia, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
There is compelling evidence from gender interventions in Upper Egypt that engaging men is critical to transform deeply rooted gender inequities. Through the Enabling Better Parenting for Non-Violence and Inclusion (EBNI) project, a two-year intervention that was implemented from September 2019 to November 2021 in three governorates in Upper Egypt, eight grassroots Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in eight villages were supported with the goal of enabling men and women to engage in more equitable relationships. The project employed a comprehensive strategy to utilize Social and Behavior Change (SBC) to inspire men to alter deeply rooted gender power dynamics within and outside the household unit, which is the focus of this presentation. Engaging men in gender programming in Upper Egypt was not a commonly used approach prior to the project, so piloting engagement strategies was needed to confirm their transformative effect. The project mobilized local youth and leaders through grassroots CBOs to identify and implement locally appropriate activities that engage men on issues of respectful and non-violent gender behaviors. CBOs were trained on gender and SBC frameworks and methodologies to design more effective and nuanced male engagement activities. Additionally, the support of local religious and community leaders was sought so they could reinforce the messaging that was being delivered. Project evaluation results revealed a drastic shift in men's perceptions of gender roles and dynamics, and the overwhelming majority of men expressed that they are satisfied with the male engagement activities employed.
Men as Agents of Change, Men as Clients, Men as Partners: Lessons on Engaging Men to Increase Uptake of Family Planning in South Sudan
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Wanjiru Mathenge, IPPF
Co-authors :
Keliki Jane, Reproductive Health Association Of South Sudan (RHASS)
Abraham Thubo, Reproductive Health Association Of South Sudan
Melissa Cockroft, International Planned Parenthood Federation - Africa Region
South Sudan has one of the poorest reproductive health indicators in the world. Contraceptive prevalence rate is 5% and 1.7% of women report using modern methods. There is significant male resistance to contraceptive use, with examples of providers threatened with physical violence for providing services. The Women's Integrated Sexual Health 2 (W2A) Programme, funded by FCDO and led by International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) supports integrated sexual and reproductive health (SRHR) services across Africa and Asia. W2A seeks transformational change through addressing social and gender norms, creating an environment for women and girls to access SRH information and services. Round 1 of the W2A Client Exit Interviews (CEIs), reported 31% of FP clients in South Sudan disagreed with the statement that their partner supports her decision to come for services, which was validated by results from a W2A qualitative study on perceptions of community gatekeepers and male engagement in SRHR; gender roles and stereotypes contributed significantly to men and gatekeeper's lack of involvement and support for contraception. Reproductive Health Association of South Sudan (RHASS) engaged men to create an enabling environment for women and girls to access SRH information and services. This included conducting community entry meetings with gatekeepers, empowering them to become advocates, mobilizing and participating in community dialogues. Round 2 of CEIs showed an improvement in perceived partner support, with only 18% reported disagreeing that their partners were supportive of their decision to come for services as compared 31% in round one of the CEIs.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 3
Immunization Service Experience and the Importance of Caregiver and Health Worker Journeys for Changing Immunization Program Dynamics
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Immunization
Speakers
Katharine Bagshaw, United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Lisa Oot, JSI
Emmanuel Nuworzah, JSI Ghana
Immunization services have historically focused on supply and delivery, with insufficient attention on the sociobehavioral factors that impact confidence in, uptake, and demand for vaccination. More recently, immunization inequities have highlighted the critical role of demand generation and the need for people-centered models for vaccination that enhance service access, quality and accountability. The common element between these two components is the immunization service experience. Frameworks are needed that consider and respond to both health worker and client needs on immunization service delivery, and that emphasize the importance of community engagement to nurture positive social norms around vaccination. Centering the health worker, client, and community in immunization service delivery closely aligns with the focus on people-centered commitment and demand emphasized in the Immunization Agenda 2030, and with the Gavi demand framework pillar on Service Quality and Accountability. Since 2019, the Service Experience Workstream of the Global Vaccination Demand Hub has sought a common and detailed understanding of people-centered service experience for immunization. In this preformed panel, presenters will introduce the concept and key components of immunization service experience; share real-life examples of caregiver and health worker journeys to immunization via a multimedia platform; and explore how the health system, health worker, and caregiver contribute to people-centered immunization services. Participants will explore ways to address issues around individual components of the immunization service experience and how to reorient systems and services to build and sustain demand for immunization.
Improving communications among health workers and public health authorities to increase community acceptance and manage demand for COVID-19 vaccination
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Katharine Bagshaw, United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Timely and transparent communications from authorities and strong interpersonal communication skills among health workers (HWs) are the foundation for good risk communications during emergencies, like the COVID-19 pandemic. Authorities and HWs struggle with communicating with the public as new vaccines and policies are introduced, vaccine supply is irregular, insufficient, or inequitably distributed, and vaccine preferences emerge.The Global Demand Hub convened two working groups to develop resources to help fill gaps in COVID-19 vaccine demand. In December 2020, a training module was developed for HWs to increase COVID-19 vaccine knowledge and confidence. Considering the ever-changing pandemic, a guide on managing demand was developed for national and subnational stakeholders and health workers in September 2021.The first resource, Communication with the community about COVID-19 vaccination, is one of six modules in the HW training series available on the web-based OpenWHO platform. The second resource, How to manage demand and communicate on COVID-19 vaccines in a changing environment, is intended for those involved in the design and delivery of demand strategies on COVID-19 vaccination. Public health authorities and HWs around the globe participated in the online training, and communication committees are using the resources for nationwide COVID-19 vaccination roll-out. Guidance must be continuously adapted and accessible to public health professionals and HWs to foster effective communication, instill confidence, and manage demand for COVID-19 vaccines. Expansion of platforms that require low bandwidth/connectivity is essential to reach the most remote end-users of these resources.
Applying quality improvement tools to the Reaching Every District (RED) strategy to identify and address service delivery issues in hard to reach communities in Ethiopia.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Lisa Oot, JSI
To address low and inequitable immunization coverage in Ethiopia, JSI Research & Training Institute Inc. (JSI), applied concepts and tools from the field of quality improvement to develop an innovative approach to help immunization managers and service providers strengthen implementation of the national immunization strategy, Reaching Every District (RED). The approach focused on building the capability of immunization managers and health workers to plan, implement and monitor immunization services with improved quality and reach.In order to build a more equitable routine immunization program, immunization staff needed to address entrenched obstacles for service delivery. The RED-QI approach helped immunization managers identify and address barriers to implementation at the management level (i.e. address issues with cold chain or human resources) and encouraged health workers to actively engage with community members to address issues related to service delivery. JSI found that community involvement was fundamental to achieving improved immunization services and engaged communities in immunization microplanning, mapping of communities and supported integrated Quality Improvement Teams (QITs), where HWs and community members came together to identify and problem solve for issues with immunization service delivery.This presentation will demonstrate how the RED-QI approach improved the linkage between health workers and communities by integrating community members from hard-to-reach areas into activities that identify and address service delivery challenges.
Co-creating community voice, resilience, and action for immunization services
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Emmanuel Nuworzah, JSI Ghana
Since the adoption of a National Health Policy in 2007, several efforts have been made to integrate quality of care in Ghana. A quality assurance program and robust legal and policy environment have been in place for two decades. However, what a consolidated and comprehensive strategy for quality services looks like remains unclear. The health system is faced with weak organizational and management capacity, resource mobilization, and accountability systems; calls were made to integrate community support to address system challenges.The Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS) program was adopted to integrate community voice and input into health planning and delivery of essential community-based health services. This program has become one of the strongest service delivery entries for community participation in immunization activities. Nonetheless, the program's persistent over reliance on top-down policy and program implementation has adversely impacted community response to services. With communities predominantly organized around social norms and behaviors, this process prevents acceleration of community ownership, trust, and sustained demand for immunization.To establish the connection between social norms and behaviors and immunization service experience, JSI Research and Training Institute (JSI) supported the integration of human-centered design (HCD) approaches into community-based immunization modules for microplanning and demand generation for immunization in urban poor communities. The initiative mobilized immunization activities to reach over 1600 caregivers with second year of life vaccination information and services and address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. This has provided traction for scaling of people-centered approaches into community-based immunization modules.
Considerations for people-centered, quality immunization service experiences
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Katharine Bagshaw, United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
In recent years, inequities in vaccination coverage rates have highlighted the crucial component of demand generation and people-centered design needed to ensure uptake and encourage access, trust, and motivation to vaccinate and reach every child (and target populations for vaccination throughout the life course). People-centered models for vaccination that enhance service access, quality and accountability and incorporate quality of care approaches have been examined in a formal way. Since 2019, the Service Experience Workstream of the Global Vaccination Demand Hub, and with support from JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. (JSI), has been exploring a new direction in people-centered quality immunization service delivery. Through a series of key informant interviews at the global and regional levels and in four countries, and literature reviews focused on service quality and delivery and its relationship with vaccination demand, the Workstream identified 13 key components of a positive, people-centered immunization service experience. These components fall under four main themes: 1) overarching; 2) health system and facility; 3) health workers and clients; and, 4) Community. This presentation will introduce the concept of immunization service experience, highlight these four main themes and their associated 13 components, and provide updates on emerging efforts to move toward a more positive, people-centered immunization service experience reflective of client, health worker and community needs. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 4
Making People Feel Heard: Embedding Systematic Social Listening in National Vaccination Programs
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Immunization | Inclusion
Speakers
Angus Thomson, Irimi Company
Anastasiia Nurzhynska, UNICEF
Sarah Christie, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Moderators
Angus Thomson, Irimi Company
Gross inequities in COVID-19 vaccine access have been paralleled by inequities in access to reliable information. Effective social listening can enable understanding of people's concerns and information needs and track misinformation in real time. However, social listening is often equated with social media listening. With half the world digitally disenfranchised, this can only exacerbate data and information inequities. UNICEF has been facilitating vaccine social listening programs at global, regional and country levels which access both online and offline conversations. The Vaccination Demand Observatory (VDO), a global collaboration led by UNICEF, has been strengthening capacity in over 20 countries across 5 UNICEF regions. Early experience has highlighted: disparate levels of organization and resourcing of current program; a pivotal role for the social analyst and need for capacity strengthening across other functions; the potential impact of targeted, evidence-based, context-driven vaccine messaging through digital channelsTaking a dynamic approach this panel will collect and synthesize insights from participants on how to build and strengthen equitable and effective national health-focused social listening mechanisms. Participants will identify feasible and impactful actions to enable coordinated social listening to the public discourse on vaccines, including access to online and offline conversations and tight coupling of listening to RCCE through real-time actionable insights and recommendations. Primary outputs will be a refined and adaptable model for a national social listening mechanism, a recommended phased approach to integrating such a system into national routine health programming, and actionable insights to enhance current SBCC.
The Vaccination Demand Observatory: Developing equitable national vaccine social listening programs
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Angus Thomson, Irimi Company
Co-authors :
Surangani Abeyesekera, UNICEF, Head Quarters
Sarah Christie, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Saad B Omer, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Andreea Seusan, Public Good Projects
Joe Smyser, The Public Good Projects
Amidst the pandemic, global inequities in access to COVID-19 vaccines have been accompanied by rising inequities in access to accurate, relevant health information. Effective and equitable social listening activities–that capture both on- and offline community information sources – are critical to understanding and responding to people's concerns and information needs in ways that build durable vaccine confidence and demand. Since 2020, the Vaccine Demand Observatory (VDO) – a global collaboration along UNICEF, The Public Good Projects (PGP) and The Yale Institute for Global Health (YIGH) –has been working to build and strengthen country-specific social listening programs to help local partners counter misinformation and boost demand for vaccination. Offering support across three core service areas– Social Listening, Vaccine Communications, and Training and Technical Assistance–the VDO supports UNICEF Country Offices and their partners and stakeholders to expand their abilities to systematically identify, track, and respond to misinformation and gaps in information. Drawing on multiple country examples, early implementation experiences highlight both the impact potential of multi-sectoral social partnerships in this space, alongside resourcing and coordination gaps and capacity-strengthening needs that limit the effectiveness of current social listening programs. For example, very few countries systematically used social listening systems, and even fewer had a dedicated social analyst function. Key questions that will be addressed in this panel were informed by this multicountry experience.
Infodemic management system in Ghana – Using digital information and knowledge co-creation to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Anastasiia Nurzhynska, UNICEF
Co-authors :
Anna-Leena Lohiniva, UNICEF
Al-hassan Hudi, UNICEF Ghana
Bridget Anim, Health Promotion Division Of Ghana Health Service
Da-costa Aboagye, Ghana Health Service
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a vital need for immunization programs to better manage misinformation. The Health Promotion Division of the Ghana Health Services (GHS) together with the Ghana UNICEF Country Office has developed a systematic, 4-step approach to managing vaccine misinformation to support COVID-19 vaccine rollout. First, social listening and misinformation identification involves the collection and filtering of social and mainstream media posts by keyword queries using a commercial software platform (Talkwalker). An analyst then reviews and verifies posts flagged as misinformation. The second step includes assessing the level of risk (high, medium, low) of misinformation alerts based on the UNICEF risk assessment matrix. Step 3 involves verification of the findings and co-creation of appropriate, culturally acceptable, and practical responses through the National Misinformation Taskforce, which was established to implement and oversee this process. Building upon an existing taskforce of Risk Communication and Social Mobilization (RCSM) experts, it was expanded to include other public health experts, media, development partners, fact checkers, and UNICEF. After final approval process by appropriate government agencies, the GHS and Ministry of Information implement the response in Step 4. The Ghanaian vaccine misinformation management system is a functional and sustainable mechanism which can develop culturally appropriate infodemic responses that can be replicated in other countries in the world. This work will also support the ministry's future efforts to systematically address vaccine-related misinformation including for routine immunization.
Rebuilding public trust in routine immunizations in the Philippines through strategic digital partnership
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Sarah Christie, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Co-authors :
Scott Bokemper, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Erika Bonnevie
Kadeem Khan, Meta
Savannah Knell, Public Good Projects
Chelsey Lepage, Irimi Company
Amyn Malik, Yale Institute Of Global Health (YIGH)
Vitto Paolo Milanes, UNICEF
Joe Smyser, The Public Good Projects
Angus Thomson, Irimi Company
Saad B Omer, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, countries have seen declines in routine immunization coverage worldwide, with some countries experiencing a loss of a decade in improvements. In nations already experiencing decays in childhood RI coverage, such a downturn could result in outbreaks of vaccine preventable disease. Since 2016, the Philippines has witnessed steady declines in full routine immunization coverage, which is often attributed to the Dengvaxia controversy which eroded public trust in childhood vaccines in the Philippines. Dengvaxia, a dengue fever vaccine, was found to increase the risk of disease severity for some people who had received it. This finding has heightened public concerns about vaccine safety and increased vaccine hesitancy in the region. This study was undertaken to see whether public trust and attitudes towards safety and efficacy of childhood vaccines could be improved through strategic digital communication via UNICEF. The study team designed and tested five strategic messaging campaigns – four in Filipino, one in English – featuring: information, self-efficacy, values-based message framing, and photographic testimonials from parents and healthcare workers. Campaigns targeted Facebook users aged 18-55 years old in a brand lift study, a 5-item survey administered to those who were exposed to the campaigns (intervention) or not (control). Campaigns had differential lift, with values-based messaging, self-efficacy, and testimonial content performing strongly. Collectively, the campaigns reached 9.5M Facebook users on average, with 340,457 clicks for additional vaccine information. These findings highlight the potential for designing effective digital content to strengthen vaccine confidence.
From insights to impact: results from a five-country process evaluation to address vaccine hesitancy online
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Sarah Christie, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Co-authors :
Scott Bokemper, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Erika Bonnevie
Kadeem Khan, Meta
Savannah Knell, Public Good Projects
Chelsey Lepage, Irimi Company
Amyn Malik, Yale Institute Of Global Health (YIGH)
Saad B Omer, Yale Institute For Global Health (YIGH)
Joe Smyser, The Public Good Projects
Angus Thomson, Irimi Company
Maike Winters, Yale Institute For Global Health
Vaccine hesitancy is recognized by the World Health Organization as one of the leading threats to global health worldwide. Social media has the potential to reach millions of people with informative content through credible sources, but public health agencies have limited evidence-based tools to design and evaluate their digital health communications, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This 5-country study was undertaken to understand whether strategic digital content could be designed and evaluated for its potential to shift knowledge and attitudes toward vaccine confidence, and strengthen vaccine demand. Four countries (India, Kenya, Pakistan and Ukraine) focused on COVID-19 vaccines, while The Philippines targeted routine immunization activities. Leveraging detailed insights from social media, local intelligence and behavioral science, this partnership designed 33 campaigns with 100+ messages tested in various languages through UNICEF country offices. Campaigns were launched on Facebook, and assessed using a 5-item survey administered to users who were randomized to have seen the ad sets (intervention) compared to those who had not (control). Content was highly recalled, resulted in 3.88M clicks to online vaccine resources, and reached over 192M Facebook users over the test period. Content in local languages tended to have more user engagement, and values-based campaigns also achieved statistically significant increases in the perceived importance of vaccines, and whether users would recommend vaccines to friends/family.  This study demonstrated a process that public sector partners can adopt for designing and assessing health communications at scale, to inform future vaccine demand efforts.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 5
Monitoring, Evaluation, Research and Learning for Digital Adolescent Health Programmes: Innovations and Lessons Learned During COVID-19
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Research
Speakers
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Mbathio DIAW, ONG RAES
Olaniyi Olutola, DKT Nigeria
Niharika Sharma, Girl Effect India
Nicola Harford, IMedia Associates Ltd
The move to digital SBCC began pre-pandemic and is still relatively new territory for some donor and practitioner organisations. In combination with traditional media channels, platforms such as Instagram, WhatsApp, YouTube and Facebook have expanded the SBCC ecosystem. Monitoring, evaluation, research and learning (MERL) for digital SBCC is equally a rapidly evolving field and presents a number of methodological, technological and ethical challenges. It also provides opportunities to gain a more nuanced and sophisticated understanding of audiences and their evolving needs, their engagement with online/social media, and of behaviour change pathways and impact. This panel focuses on SBCC for reproductive health and draws on investments that are testing and evaluating digital media platforms as a promising intervention for improving adolescent reproductive health, especially driving modern contraceptive prevalence rates, demand and demand satisfaction. Using a talk show-style format, a facilitator from iMedia will host a semi-formal discussion amongst four panellists who represent programmes in East and West Africa, and in India. The host will introduce panellists and invite them to compare and contrast their MERL goals, approaches and tools, challenges and lessons learned, in an iterative and interactive way. The host will also invite the audience to contribute relevant ideas and experiences and to engage with panellists both during and after the discussion.This panel will open up a conversation about selecting strategies and tools for MERL of digital SBCC through sharing of experiences and lessons, with the aim of informing and progressing understanding amongst researchers, implementers and funders.
How Shujaaz uses digital data collection to gather insights and assess impact of a media campaign on barriers to contraception uptake among youth in East Africa.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Anastasia Mirzoyants, Shujaaz Inc
Shujaaz, a network of youth-centric social ventures, uses its media platforms to stimulate large-scale conversations among young East Africans on critical Health, Money, Agency, and Governance issues.Shujaaz's Health campaign aims to break down barriers that prevent youth from using modern contraception, including myths, misconceptions, misinformation, and negative social norms. Shujaaz achieves that by showcasing positive deviance among youth and modelling positive behaviours through real-life and fictional stories of young people similar to its fans. Even before COVID-19, Shujaaz had been using digital data-collection tools (e.g., SMS and Facebook surveys, WhatsApp Focus Groups, machine learning, natural language processing, social media analytics) to develop a nuanced understanding of its audience, design tailored content for various segments, deliver content with precision, and scale up impact while remaining cost effective. The Shujaaz experience shows that digital monitoring, evaluation, research and learning (MERL) enables large scale, more inclusive, robust studies, which can inform better social and behaviour change communications (SBCC) design and delivery for deeper, lasting impact. Moreover, digital MERL studies have strong potential for predictive power, which makes them even more valuable. Shujaaz is further investing in understanding and improving design and use of digital MERL tools and practices for better SBCC through upskilling of the in-house team and developing new, purposeful partnerships.
Measuring and characterising audience engagement with the C’est La Vie programme in Francophone West Africa
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Mbathio DIAW, ONG RAES
Co-authors :
Philip Massey, Dornsife School Of Public Health, Drexel University
C'est La Vie! (CLV), is a health-focused series produced in West Africa, broadcasting much of its content on social media, in addition to television and radio. CLV content is shared on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. It measured and characterised audience engagement by collecting and analysing a sample of public YouTube comments on CLV Series 2. The methodology used a self-selected sample of viewers who left unprompted comments. As well as quantitative analysis of metadata, qualitative data was coded for two broad domains: 1) entertainment, including characters mentioned and narrative engagement; 2) health topics, including gender, and sexual and reproductive health (SRH).Viewers frequently mentioned characters by name and identified with them. Overall, more comments focused on entertainment aspects of the series, such as discussing characters and storylines, than those related to health theme domains, where SRH featured most often. The theory-informed approach to analysis drew on robust evidence that demonstrates the importance of entertainment and engagement along the path to behaviour change.The use of social media platforms to disseminate content is an important strategy for health interventions: platforms such as YouTube also permit collation and analysis of publicly available data to allow researchers to assess audience exposure and engagement and understand how people interact with online health content. CLV's observational study provides evidence, methodology and applications of online data for programme evaluation, particularly by defining constructs drawn from narrative engagement theory. Future work could measure audience engagement over time to help attribute programme exposure to targeted change.
Monitoring family planning needs and behaviour change intentions and follow-through using Customer Relations Management software: the experience of the Honey & Banana Connect Program in Nigeria
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Olaniyi Olutola, DKT Nigeria
Co-authors :
Dominique Meekers, Tulane University
Chidinma Onuoha, DKT Nigeria
Digital platforms provide a unique opportunity to monitor changes in the target audience's needs in near real-time, and to make rapid programme adjustments. The Honey&Banana (H&B) programme uses a digital platform to provide family planning information and referrals to a network of trained providers. The main component of the H&B platform is a toll-free call centre staffed by trained agents who answer enquiries about family planning and contraception. H&B uses Customer Relations Management (CRM) software to monitor changes in customers' needs and their behavioural intentions, and to make corresponding programme adjustments. Our findings show that intervention activities such as targeted media campaigns can affect the needs of the audience (such needing information about long-acting reversible contraceptives) as well as behaviour change intentions (such as accepting a referral to a family planning provider). However, less targeted demand generation campaigns can attract a broader audience that is less motivated to adopt behaviour change. The finding that the needs of the target audience can change rapidly highlights the value of digital tools that can monitor those needs in near real-time, and the importance of programs to be nimble and be responsive to the changing needs of the audience. Digital tools such as the CRM also proved useful during the COVID-19 pandemic because customer data continued to be collected throughout the pandemic, despite the restrictions on physical movement during the lockdown.
Evaluating the incremental impact of multiple seasons of Chhaa Jaa in India using Digital Impact Surveys on Facebook
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Niharika Sharma, Girl Effect India
Launched in 2019, Chhaa Jaa ('Go forth and shine') is Girl Effect's digital-only programme that invests in behaviour change communications to improve sexual and reproductive health outcomes for Indian adolescent girls. To date the programme has delivered three seasons of content on social media, using high production formats and containing content designed to reflect girls' lives and needs.Digital Impact Surveys (DIS) were conducted using Facebook to assess the impact of each Chhaa Jaa season and identify psychological drivers that required greater focus in subsequent seasons of Chhaa Jaa, and to modify messages and formats to build towards the final outcomes.Overall the study was able to track shifts in intention (12%) and behaviour uptake (6%) for menstruation-related issues in the first 2 seasons, as well as identify dosage levels required to achieve sexual and reproductive health-related outcomes among girls. Multiple waves of this study also indicated that compared to other outcomes, achieving contraception uptake requires longer, more targeted interventions.This methodology's primary challenge will be the ability to replicate it on non-Facebook products, because every digital platform has its own unique targeting functionalities. Girl Effect's Insights team will in future strategize in sync with the programme's expansion plans and explore ways of rolling out surveys on the potential platforms. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 1
Youth Get Social
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Research | Social Media
Speakers
Adaora Uzoh-Ntiwunka, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria.
Arthur Armand Arnaud Daboné, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mireille Umutoni Sekamana, YLabs
Martha Silva, Tulane University / Population Council
Moderators
Nur Hidayati Handayani, UNICEF East Asia And Pacific
Using Data Triangulation to Evaluate a Complex Youth-Led Mass and Social Media Campaign in Côte d’Ivoire
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Martha Silva, Tulane University / Population Council
Co-authors :
Dana Loll, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Erin Portillo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Denise Adou, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Timothy Werwie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Radha Rajan, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Claudia Vondrasek, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Rebecca Ezouatchi, CERA GROUP
Sethson Kassegne, CERA Group
Leanne Dougherty, Population Council
Merci Mon Héros (MMH) is a youth co-led multi-media campaign seeking to improve reproductive health and family planning (RH/FP) outcomes among youth living in nine francophone countries. This complex campaign, implemented across multiple settings, required a multi-faceted evaluation methodology, bringing together social media listening, quantitative monitoring surveys, qualitative evaluation techniques, and routine program monitoring data to generate a more complete "big picture" view of the campaign's potential effects. This presentation showcases the use of a multi-pronged evaluation approach to inform complex SBC health campaigns. Three data sources were used to evaluate MMH in Côte d'Ivoire: social listening, quantitative cross-sectional monitoring survey, and complexity aware qualitative study. Social listening showed online conversations related to MMH campaign topics spiked two weeks after topic-specific campaign posts, suggesting potential campaign impact. Exposure survey results showed adults exposed to the MMH campaign were more likely than those unexposed of having spoken with someone about FP in the past five months. Youth exposed to the campaign reported 2.57 times the odds of having spoken to someone about FP, but were significantly less likely than adults to report feeling comfortable discussing FP with family members. Qualitative findings corroborate young people's need for adult guidance and support. Despite the perception that young people have ample access to RH/FP information, they require supportive guidance from trusted adults, yet are impeded by unsupportive social norms. This evaluation shows evidence of MMH's impact in encouraging intergenerational communication. We present recommendations for continued evidence-informed programming.
Using a Youth-Driven Design to Increase Mental Health Literacy Among Youth in Rwanda: Lessons from Tegura Ejo Heza Program
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Mireille Umutoni Sekamana, YLabs
Co-authors :
Therese Bagwaneza, YLabs Inc
Tanya Bandhari, YLbas.Studio.Ltd
Rien Pour Nous, Sans Nous - les Leaders Jeunes Derrière et Devant la Campagne Multi-Média sur la SR/PF des Jeunes, Merci Mon Héros
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Arthur Armand Arnaud Daboné, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Komlan Edem Dzadza, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Partout dans le monde, et en particulier dans les pays à revenu bas ou intermédiaire, certaines normes sociales conservatrices empêchent souvent les conversations ouvertes sur la puberté, le sexe et la planification familiale (PF). Ces tabous ont un impact particulier sur les jeunes - notamment avant qu'ils ne se marient ou n'aient leur premier enfant - et entravent souvent l'accès des jeunes à la PF. Merci Mon Héros (MMH), une campagne multimédia régionale, supportée par le projet Breakthrough ACTION (BA), financé par l'USAID, répond à ces défis. MMH vise à réduire l'impact des normes sociales et de genre qui empêchent l'accès des jeunes à la PF. MMH fournit des plateformes d'échanges virtuelles, sur les médias de masse, et en personne entre jeunes/adolescents et les adultes sur les difficultés que les jeunes rencontrent dans la recherche d'informations sur la santé de la reproduction (SR) et les services de PF. Lancée en ligne en novembre 2019, elle est mise en œuvre actuellement dans cinq pays à savoir la Côte d'Ivoire, le Niger, le Burkina Faso, le Togo et, plus récemment, la RDC, et gérée aujourd'hui principalement par un groupe de jeunes consultants régionaux.
Using Social Media to Reach Young People with Planning Messages.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Adaora Uzoh-Ntiwunka, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria.
Co-authors :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Adenike Ayodele, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Oluwagbemisola Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Olajumoke Olarewaju, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Itunu Dave-Agbola, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria
The Resilient & Accelerated Scale-Up of DMPA-SC (Depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate- Subcutaneous) Self-Injection in Nigeria (RASuDiN) project aims to expand family planning (FP) method choice and empower women by supporting the roll-out of DMPA-SC self-injection. Over a 2-year implementation period (2018-2020), the project recorded a low reach, referral, and completed referral rate for youths aged 18-25 years. The project was only able to reach youths with information about modern FP methods through interpersonal communication. The Center for Communication and Social Impact (CCSI) being the project's implementing partner for Demand Generation interventions, launched a pilot social media campaign in March 2021. The campaign strategy was aimed at reaching youths via social media and it was anchored by Dr. Chinonso Egemba popularly known as "Aproko Doctor", who has huge followership on social media platforms that already identify with the goals of the campaign. Asides from leveraging the influencer's page for traction, the project also created its platform on Twitter called "people wey Sabi" which is translated to "knowledgeable people". The project utilized threads, challenges, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), Twitter Spaces, and Posters to create content that provided knowledge and built conversations around family planning, especially DMPA-SC Self Injection. Within 3-months implementation period, the project's page gained over 1000 followers on Twitter. Due to the Federal Government of Nigeria's (FGoN) ban on Twitter operations in Nigeria, the campaign halted on Twitter and has been implemented only on Facebook and Instagram since July 2021. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 2
Addressing Sexual Violence Through Digital Approaches
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Gender | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Kathryn Yount, Emory University
Tran Hung Minh, Center For Creative Initiatives In Health And Population
Folake Oni, Sydani Initiative For International Development
Renata Tallarico, No, UNFPA East And Southern Africa Regional Office
Rachel Litoroh, CISP
Nancy Perrin, Johns Hopkins School Of Nursing
Moderators
Julia Bello-Bravo, Purdue University
Youth Centered Designed Digital Solutions - the Evaluation of TuneMe.org: Moving Towards Behavioural Change!
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Renata Tallarico, No, UNFPA East And Southern Africa Regional Office
Co-authors :
Sydney Hushie, UNFPA East And Southern Africa
The need for young people to receive quality information on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), prevention of child marriage, gender-based violence (GBV), and early and unintended pregnancy drove the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), in collaboration with the Ford Foundation and Praekelt Foundation, to create a platform where youth can access age-appropriate and accurate SRHR information. TuneMe.org, developed as a part of the Safeguard Young People Programme1 (SYP), is a web-based platform accessed through Java-enabled devices and simple mobile phones. It takes advantage of the high rate of access to mobile phones and increasing Internet penetration across East and Southern Africa. The aim was to promote sexual and reproductive health outcomes for at least three million young people aged 10 to 24 years within the first four years and across seven of the SYP implementing countries (Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe).
Ideational Predictors of the Awareness, Help-Seeking Behavior and Reporting of Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Against Women and Girls Among IDP Communities in Abuja, Nigeria
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
OLUCHI BASSEY, Sydani Initiative For International Development
Co-authors :
Folake Oni, Sydani Initiative For International Development
Sidney Sampson, Sydani Initiative For International Development
Oluwatosin Adenipekun, Sydani Group
Shiva Gab-deedam, Sydani Group
Oluomachukwu Omeje, Sydani Group
In Nigeria, gender-based violence against women and girls (GBV) continues to be of great concern in its different forms of intimate partner violence (IPV), rape, sexual assault (SA), and female genital mutilation, with Nigerian women and girls inordinately exposed to its pervasive physical, psychological, sexual and reproductive health impact. Growing statistics, exacerbated during the COVID-19 lockdown among marginalized groups especially in conflict-prone locations and internally displaced persons (IDP) camps, highlight the need for initiatives that prevent or completely eradicate these acts. The Preventing Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Sexual Assault (SA) in Nigeria (PISAN) project is a mobile technology-enabled intervention designed and piloted by Sydani to improve IPV and SA reporting, access to care, and response amongst internally displaced women and girls across eight IDP camps in Abuja, Nigeria. A baseline assessment was conducted to understand current IPV and SA knowledge, reporting, and available response systems in the camps, using a mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) data collection approach. Assessment findings revealed high levels of awareness of GBV across all eight camps with IPV and SA being the prevalent GBV types. Findings also highlighted low reporting rates due to inaction from authorities, social power dynamics, and victim-shaming, which is also said to deter survivors from seeking care. Therefore, it is imperative now more than ever, to galvanize efforts in reshaping the power dynamics that perpetuate this menace and improve the help-seeking behavior and reporting of GBV in internally displaced persons camps
Theoretical Mediators of GlobalConsent: An Adapted Web-Based Sexual Violence Prevention Program for University Men in Vietnam
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Kathryn Yount, Emory University
Co-authors :
Irina Bergenfeld
Katherine Anderson, Emory University
Quach Thu Trang, CCIHP
Jessica Sales, Emory University
Yuk Fai Cheong
Tran Hung Minh, Center For Creative Initiatives In Health And Population
Sexual violence remains a global problem that disproportionately affects women. Though sexual violence interventions exist, few have been implemented in low- or middle-income countries, and none in Vietnam for young men. We adapted a sexual violence-prevention intervention developed for college men in the U.S., and conducted a randomized controlled trial of the adapted intervention (GlobalConsent) with college men in Vietnam. We assessed the effects of GlobalConsent on sexually violent behavior and prosocial bystander behavior, directly and through theoretically targeted mediators. Consenting heterosexual or bisexual men 18-24 years starting at one of two universities in September 2019 (n=793) completed a baseline survey and were assigned to GlobalConsent or attention-control, both web-based. Path analysis was performed to study the mediating effects of knowledge/cognitive, belief/attitudinal, affective, and efficacy/intention variables measured at six months on sexually violent behavior and prosocial bystander behavior measured at 12 months. In parallel multiple-mediator models, GlobalConsent influenced the odds of sexually violent behavior directly and indirectly, via knowledge of sexual violence legality and harm and rape myth attitudes. The effect of GlobalConsent on prosocial bystander behavior was mainly direct, with significant indirect effects via knowledge of active consent, knowledge of alcohol's effects, and bystander efficacy and intention. Understanding the pathways by which an intervention affects primary outcomes is critical to guide efficacious delivery of the intervention in other populations. Findings suggest that GlobalConsent influences behavior through exposure to the program as a whole, offering guidance for scale-up and adaptation across Southeast Asia.
Effectiveness and Lessons Learned from Scaling-up Communities Care Intervention to Reduce Harmful Social Norms that Foster Gender-based Violence.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Rachel Litoroh, CISP
Nancy Perrin, Johns Hopkins School Of Nursing
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 4
Using Digital Approaches to Improve Women's Lives
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Gender | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Yunita Wahyuningrum, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Selamawit Teklehaimanot, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Ethiopis Deribe, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Janine Simon-Meyer, UNICEF
Aissata Joséphine Diori, CRS
Moderators
Radha Rajan, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gaba Dey Mata! A Multisectoral Approach for Helping Women Reach Leadership Positions
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Aissata Joséphine Diori, CRS
Co-authors :
Martha Populin
"Girma" is a multisectoral development project implemented in Niger and funded by USAID/Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance. In Girma's project area, women are underrepresented in community-based organizations (CBOs) and almost never reach leadership positions. Girma developed a multisectoral approach for tackling the root causes of this problem. This approach combines four activities: (i) Leadership training for women who are already members of CBOs; (ii) Training on women's rights for all members of targeted CBOs; (iii) A couple's strengthening approach called Maison Familiale Harmonieuse (Harmonious Family House), including a specific module on local governance; and (iv) Literacy training for both women who are already members of CBOs and others aspiring to become members. The main result was a spectacular increase in women reaching leadership positions in CBOs within one year, widely exceeding project targets. Key lessons learned (with programmatic implications) are that: (i) for catalyzing social change, both influential and marginalized groups need to be involved; and (ii) in a low literacy environment, the ideal sequencing of activities starts with literacy training, followed by leadership training, the establishment of action plans and a frequent post-training accompaniment and monitoring of action plans implementation. 
Transforming SBC Data Collection for the COVID-19 Vaccine Roll-Out: a South African Experience
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Janine Simon-Meyer, UNICEF
Co-authors :
Pumla Ntlabati
Daniel Hartford, UNICEF
Toby Fricker, UNICEF
South Africa planned to roll out its first vaccination program in February 2021, targeting 1,2 million healthcare workers (HCW). However, there was no data on how HCW felt or thought about the vaccine and the potential impact of hesitancy on broader uptake. UNICEF, in partnership with the National Department of Health (NDoH), implemented a Behavioural and Social Drivers (BeSD) survey to address this gap, and inform the response. The adapted BeSD survey tool was run on the low data Internet of Good Things (IoGT) from 29 January to 05 February 2021. The NDoH launched and promoted the IoGT survey link through its cost-free website, online learning platform, by email, WhatsApp and multiple stakeholder networks. Of the 22,751 HCW who responded, 80% indicated the vaccine was important for their health and 70% indicated they would take the vaccine. Only 32% trusted the vaccine "very much", with efficacy (31%), safety (26%) and trust in authorities (14%) core concerns. The adaptable survey tool and digital platforms and networks were key to UNICEF rapidly advocating for the survey and it's effective, speedy and free distribution and uptake. Results were shared with the response team. Although the line to a specific response was not always direct, the HCW survey provided concrete and actionable evidence to inform vaccine rollout programming and advocacy, demonstrating how digital networks and accessible data collection and analysis platforms can transform data gathering for SBCC. Broader access to, and more effective use of this infrastructure should be promoted.   
Engaging Women to bridge the Gender Digital Divide in Ethiopia: The Experience of Digital Health Activity (DHA)
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Selamawit Teklehaimanot, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Ethiopis Deribe, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Co-authors :
Loko Bongassie, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Herman Willems, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Tariku Bogale, JSI/Digital Health Activity
Background: Gender digital exclusion is a global problem with a higher gap in Sub-Saharan African countries. In Ethiopia, technology literacy and use of digital tools among women including female health professionals is very low. Approaches: USAID Digital Health Activity (DHA) is a five-year USAID-funded project that supports the health sector of Ethiopia in digitalization, data use and governance. The project conducted a gender analysis at the beginning of 2020 to identify the gender digital gap, and has intervened to ensure gender equality in the program implementation. Results:  During the last two years, the proportion of women assuming leadership positions reached 33.0%. Training was given on Health Information System (HIS) to 12, 984 staff within the health sector in Ethiopia of which 5511 (42.4%) were women. The proportion of female trainees increased by 338 percent between 2020 to 2021. Thirteen youth enterprises composed of 95 members were established with the technical and financial support of DHA where eight of them are led by women. These women-led enterprises supported 449 (65.1%) of the 690 project supported health institutions across the country. Lessons learned: Empowering women by bringing them to leadership positions, and through providing development related training within digital health intervention projects help bridge the gender-digital divide.
Impact of the Tablet-Based Balanced Counseling Strategy on Contraceptive Method Discontinuation Rates in Indonesia
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Yunita Wahyuningrum, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Robert Ainslie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
This presentation describes the design and effective use of a tablet-based digital tool to improve family planning (FP) counseling and service outcomes in Indonesia. The Balanced Counseling System (BCS) was designed to reduce contraceptive method discontinuation rates caused by two typical failings of FP counseling processes: (1) failure to ensure that clients are able to make an informed method choice that matches their personal contraceptive needs, and (2) failure to adequately prepare clients to use their chosen method effectively, including understanding and managing potential side effects. For this study, three waves of data were collected (including observations/videotaping of 600 counseling sessions with 60 providers, and interviews with those same providers and clients) in treatment and control facilities, before and after BCS training. Comparisons of counseling techniques and content delivered pre-post training showed dramatic improvements in counseling practices among trained providers. Better counseling was hypothesized to reduce twelve-month method dropout rates. Analysis after 12 months showed lower rates of discontinuation among women in the treatment facilities compared to the national average (8.2% vs. 28.2%). Clients were also less likely to cite side effects as the reason for discontinuation in treatment facilities compared to the national average (20% vs. 33%). This presentation will discuss the advantages and challenges of using digital solutions to improve service delivery quality and outcomes.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 5
The Last Mile: Can We Reach Vulnerable & Marginalized Groups with Digital Approaches?
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Nutrition | Social Media | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Tham Tran, PATH
Paul Falzone, Peripheral Vision International
Lauren Frank, Portland State University
Bhai Shelly Bhai Shelly, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Dipak Raj Aryal, Helen Keller International
Moderators
Ousseni SEBGO, Ministry Of Health
Leveraging the Power of Digital Media to Improve Family Health and Nutrition
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Dipak Raj Aryal, Helen Keller International
Co-authors :
Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Helen Keller International
Pooja Pandey, Helen Keller International
In just two generations, Nepal's demographics have vastly changed. More people are educated, live in urban areas, have sources of income other than agriculture, and are exposed to the outside world through visits for employment, education, or tourism. For example, 93% of new mothers have completed high school. This is a dramatic 86% higher than the grandmothers as only 7% of them have completed high school. Half of families are nuclear, and 32% of mothers are raising their children alone as their husbands have migrated abroad for employment. With migration comes remittances and greater purchasing power. According to a January 2022 survey, 73% of mothers have access to a mobile phone, and nearly 58% of those with mobile phones have access to internet. These changes will impact how development programs are delivered in Nepal. This presentation will highlight the changing demographics of Nepal and the evolving media preferences that have impacted development programs, including in health and nutrition. Taking insights from the USAID-funded Suaahara II Good Nutrition program in Nepal, the session will reflect on the program's adaptation of communication approaches and challenges, specifically by adopting digital media and leveraging the power of mobile technology and social media. In particular, the session will focus on the challenges of developing a mobile application targeted to communities with lower digital literacy, slower internet bandwidth, and higher data cost.
HELLO DIDI 2.0: Use of Mobile Phones to Improve Child and Maternal Nutrition Practices in Uttar Pradesh, India
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Bhai Shelly Bhai Shelly, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Building on the Covid experience in Uttar Pradesh, India, in the year 2021, a phone-based counselling system (Hello Didi 2.0) was established to accelerate rehabilitation of Severe Acute Malnourished (SAM) at home and increase the demand and utilization of maternal nutrition services. This covered six blocks of three aspirational districts affected by array of social and gender equity issues. A new mix of digital platforms-including telephonic counseling, SMS (Short Message Service), entertaining WhatsApp videos and audio-books- was harnessed for rescuing SAM children and Pregnant Women during the pandemic.With caregivers from last mile population at core, trained tele-counselors engaged simultaneously with Frontline Functionaries (FLFs) and the caregivers. A combination of information & counseling; problem solving; and entertainment education approaches were used.A visible change in food and feeding practices among the most vulnerable families has been seen. Comparison of feeding practices between first and fourth call shows consumption of food groups increased to four or more food groups (14 percent to 46 percent) and meal frequency (four meals or above) increased from 10.2 percent to 22.5 percent.Digital penetration is quite high globally and this experience can be replicated by public, private and social sector for accelerated gains in multiple development outcomes.Keeping in view the importance of scale, diversity and equity issues, it is recommended to Institutionalize digital capacity within public sector; Enhance public-private partnership; Adopt mix of conventional (like community platforms) and digital platforms; Engage more with women SHGs & federations and Nudge men through digital platforms.
Using Mobile Phone Interventions to Promote Global Health and Wealth
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Lauren Frank, Portland State University
Paul Falzone, Peripheral Vision International
SBCC interventions have struggled to reach "the last mile." We developed the Wanji format using basic cell phones with interactive voice technology to reach marginalized communities who have less access to education, limited literacy, and/or limited digital access. Drawing from social cognitive theory and research about interactive narratives, we have developed interventions on topics including financial savings, sexual and reproductive health, agricultural practices, public health, and COVID-19 prevention. We employed a series of mixed methods studies including a field experiment in Uganda, a laboratory experiment in Cambodia, and audience tracking in Mali. The results support the promise of interactive phone technology using basic mobile phones for social and behavior change. In the field experiment, there was evidence suggesting the possibility for participants to learn more from interactive, narrative than from static content that is simply read over the phone. Moreover, we addressed the important question of how much exposure to an intervention is necessary to affect change. Intervention designers must balance the importance of repetition for learning and behavioral change against the possible consequences of decreasing enjoyment and boredom. Finally, we found that new interventions using interactive mobile phone technology could be rapidly deployed during COVID-19, reaching large audiences with limited access to technology and health information. 
Pandemic-Proofing HIV testing and Prevention in Vietnam
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Tham Tran, PATH
Co-authors :
Kim Green, PATH
Thai Phan
Ha Nguyen, PATH
Zoe Humeau, PATH
Trang Ngo, USAID
Thanh Le, Glink
Phong Nguyen, My Home
Thuan Nguyen, Alo Care
Mai Chau Vu Hoang, Bien Viet
In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Vietnam introduced strict measures to control transmission, including social distancing and lockdown. During these unsettling times, people living with HIV and key populations (KP) were a vulnerable group, requiring adapted support and focused information on COVID-19 and COVID-19/HIV prevention. Understanding these needs, the USAID/PATH Healthy Markets project crowdsourced ideas from the community to rapidly offer online HIV services. This included setting-up an Online Risk Calculator whereby clients can self-screen for their HIV risk, order an HIV self-test (HIVST) kit, and contact a KP-clinic to receive follow-up counseling and care. In addition, the project launched the "#Stay Home. #Self Test." campaign, co-created and promoted by KP-influencers across various online platforms, and boosted COVID-19/HIV communications across TikTok, YouTube, gay dating apps, and other online channels. From April 2020 – February 2022, more than 2.8 million people have viewed the #Stay Home. #Self Test. campaign, helping 2,265 self-screeners access and use the Online Risk Calculator and directly resulting in 1,230 HIVST kit orders and 668 bookings for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) services for HIV prevention. At large, these innovations have contributed to the rapid scale-up of digital media in Vietnam's HIV response that is pivotal in increasing connection with communities that are at risk for HIV and improving service uptake. 
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Poster Space
Poster Presentations
Format : Poster Presentations
Speakers
Rajeev Seth, BUDS
Rajeev Seth, Https://budsngo.org/
Benoit Renard , Triggerise
Rodwell Ndlovu
Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Helen Keller International
Jessee Njunguru, Triggerise
Joseph Segodi, UNICEF Botswana
Ansar Rasheed, UNICEF
William Bird, Media Monitoring Africa
L. Arlette Saavedra Romero, Secretaria De Salud
ELENA MONSERRAT LICONA LEON, General Directorate Of Health Promotion
Sulah Kaggwa Sekisambu, UNICEF
Aarunima Bhatnagar, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Helena Bon, UNICEF ESARO
Joanna Kretzer Chun, World Relief
Simon Moore, Avert
Peggy Koniz-Booher, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Oluwakemi Akagwu, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Amy Henderson Riley, Thomas Jefferson University
Joseph Sherlock, Duke University
Massimiliano Sani, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Lyndsay Gavin, Center For Advanced Hindsight
Swathi Vepachedu
Amna Al Abri, University Of Technology And Applied Sciences
JAOM FISHER, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit - Vietnam
Daniel Kasansula, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
Vania Gones, SwipeRx
Linda Osaji, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Sanghamitra Singh
Jean-Sébastien KOUAME, Population Services International (PSI)
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Digital media for young people in Myanmar – breaking taboos and discussing reproductive health.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Co-authors :
Yin Htun, BBC Media Action
Le compagnon numérique de la plateforme sociale « entre nous » (chatbot assistante de gabi
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Jean-Sébastien KOUAME, Population Services International (PSI)
Co-authors :
SORO AMADOU, Population Services International(PSI)
AI Chatbot for Youth Engagement and Sexual and Reproductive Health Promotion
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Hua Wang, University At Buffalo, The State University Of New York
Co-authors :
Sneha Gupta
Arvind Singhal, The University Of Texas At El Paso
Poonam Muttreja, Population Foundation Of India
Sanghamitra Singh
Poorva Sharma
Alice Piterova
The safe resumption of community SBC activities during the COVID-19 pandemic: the role of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) in Nigeria
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Linda Osaji, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Temitope Ogunbi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Bolatito Aiyenigba, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nii Lante Heward-Mills, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Idowu Akanmu
Angela Acosta, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Foyeke Oyedokun-Adebagbo , United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Ian Tweedie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Leveraging a Digital Network to Inform and Deploy a Campaign to Motivate Pharmacists to Screen & Refer Presumptive TB Clients in Indonesia
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Vania Gones, SwipeRx
Co-authors :
Trishanty Rondonuwu, FHI360
Putri Charisma
Phoebe Elizaga
Jaca Maison Lailo
Lucky Fatoni
Using Multiple Social and Behaviour Change Communication Interventions increase uptake of COVID 19 vaccination services. Lessons from East Central Uganda.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Daniel Kasansula, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
Co-authors :
Keith Baleeta, University Research Co., LLC
Esther Kalanzi, USAID Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services In East Central Uganda (RHITES-EC) Project, URC
Augustin Muhwezi, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC), URC
Robert Iriso, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
When the first surge of COVID-19 hit Uganda in the early months of 2020, there was a lot of information about it, and it was quite difficult to tell what was true and what was false. The disease itself was new and anything could pass. Social media platforms were loaded with, especially scary information. What was clear was that it was deadly. Although the Ministry of Health, quickly developed Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), by the time these were disseminated the first scary but convincing messages about the corona virus and COVID-19 had taken deep root in the minds of many, making compliance to SOPs difficult. The MoH designed its messages around three main actions to prevent the spread of the corona virus:Wear a maskWash hands regularlyKeep social distanceIn March 2021 a fourth action, vaccination against COVID-19, was added to the list. Working with the Ministry of Health, the USAID/Regional Health Integrated to Enhance Services in East Central (RHITES-EC) project oriented and deployed risk communication agents to conduct interpersonal communication activities, disseminated COVID-19 Health communication materials to trigger discussions on accurate information and demystify rumours, conducted mentorships with cultural and religious leaders on facts about COVID-19, held support supervision meetings with key stakeholders purposely to offer timely and appropriate information on COVID-19 vaccines. At the end of all this, by February 13, 2022, the EC region attained average vaccination consumption of 70% across the 12 districts.
Community-led Strategies to Combat Misinformation and Aid Vaccine Acceptance: Five Case Studies from the Global South
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Rajeev Seth, BUDS
Rajeev Seth, Https://budsngo.org/
Co-authors :
Rubina Qasim, Dow University
Benson Wamalwa, University Of Nairobi
Luisa Enria, London School Of Health And Tropical Medicine
Momin Kazi , Aga Khan University
Kate Hopkins
The Sabin Vaccine Institute's 2020-2021 Social and Behavioral Grants Program partners concluded their year-long research projects in December 2021. Five multidisciplinary teams in four countries (Sierra Leone, Kenya, Pakistan and India) were awarded funding to explore the drivers of COVID-19 misinformation and its impact on both routine immunization and COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Research teams and communities co-designed interventions employing a range of social listening and communication dissemination strategies, including the use of digital and social media, to increase vaccine literacy and willingness to vaccinate. Community-based participatory research equipped and empowered community influencers in both traditional and non-traditional leadership roles to dispel rumors and misinformation and support health knowledge translation and trust between patients and providers, which increased vaccine acceptance.Evidence-based strategies remain an imperative to combat the global COVID-19 infodemic and health mis- and disinformation circulating both online and offline to increase vaccine acceptance and vaccination uptake. Given the diversity of cultures and communities across and within countries, these strategies require tailoring to the localized context but with a design approach that is scalable and replicable in other settings to optimize reach and impact. Through synthesis of five successful grant partner project methodological approaches, community-tailored interventions and findings, Sabin and its partners are providing an initial blueprint for replicable and scalable social and behavioral science-based communications strategies which increase vaccine confidence and acceptance within low- and middle-income country communities and offer transferrable approaches for various settings and health domains.
Achieving social equity by using digital platforms and behavioral insights to empower and motivate underserved adolescents to utilize SRH services
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Rodwell Ndlovu
Jessee Njunguru, Triggerise
Benoit Renard , Triggerise
Co-authors :
Richard Matikanya, Triggerise
Adapting SBCC interventions to the new realities of COVID-19: Experiences from a large-scale multisector nutrition program in Nepal
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Helen Keller International
Co-authors :
Pooja Pandey, Helen Keller International
Covid-19-related movement restrictions impeded planned in-person home visits and community events. Suaahara II, a 10+ year multi-sector nutrition program funded by USAID, swiftly transitioned to remote approaches, including telephone-based counseling, SMS messages, and social media, to provide crucial health and nutrition as well as Covid-19 information to the households. As a large nutrition project implemented at scale across 42 of Nepal's 77 districts, Suaahara's transition was enormously challenging. However, Suaahara II established a system for telephone counseling and follow-ups within a week of the lockdown. Over a period of two years, Suaahara II frontline workers have made nearly three million calls to two million households, linked nearly 40,000 food insecure families to the government relief package, and referred 15,000 people with Covid-19 symptoms for testing. From our experience, we have myriad lessons learned to share social and behavior change communication (SBCC) practitioners on how the program achieved the transition with speed, effectiveness, and quality. In this presentation, will discuss the enabling factors for this transition, including the information system and database where Suaahara had information of almost all households in its target areas, swift and distance capacity building of the staff, and frontline staff's pre-acquaintance with these systems This presentation will also focus on the challenges of this adaptation and mitigating measures Suaahara II adopted to overcome these challenges.
Digital Integration for Youth and Parents - Reaching Youth through their Parents
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Dinar Pandan Sari, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Integrated Social Listening for evidence based response to COVID-19 vaccine infodemic
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Joseph Segodi, UNICEF Botswana
Sulah Kaggwa Sekisambu, UNICEF
SBC has often created and allowed room for development of a range of innovative and legitimate approaches to foster sustainable adoption of desired outcomes. Social listening is a powerful societal tool that is associated with a range of uncontrollable, yet very powerful features informally accepted by both old and modern culture as well as tradition. Identifying and sampling the different sources of social listening information could offer a deeper look into infordemics associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance.The goal of this approach was to develop a model that could provide an evidence-based mechanism of addressing societal behavior towards the introduction and roll out of COVID-19 vaccines as a preventive measure against the pandemic. This would ultimately save time and other resources in debunking rumours, misinformation and subsequently increasing vaccine acceptance and demand in Botswana. The approach routinely collected data from different sources online, in communities, media and feedback mechanisms such as call centres to comprehensively analyse emerging rumours, misinformation and misconceptions and develop bi-weekly response plan.Through this approach Botswana managed to timely and accurately respond to emerging issues thereby intercepting content that might have otherwise became viral, the effectiveness of this approach resulted in high vaccine acceptance rates, 78% among youth (18-35 years) and most young people,53%, trusted information given by health workers about COVID-19 vaccine. Ultimately Botswana managed to vaccinate 43% of population by December 2021, surpassing the WHO set target of 40%.
The Real411 on COVD misinformation - empowering the public, working with platforms to combat mis and disinformation
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
William Bird, Media Monitoring Africa
Combatting online harms and mis and disinformation are central not just to defending democracy but as key communications strategies when confronted with a pandemic or infodemic.  Outside of fact checking we wanted a means to empower the public to play a key role in mitigating mis and disinformation.  Not only would doing so provide an element of agency in a battle that may seem overwhelming but it also contribute to positive behaviour in engaging more critically with content and helping to raise awareness with peers.  Media Monitoring Africa developed a public complaints platform, where online harms can be reported, assessed according to standardised local rights based principles and action can be taken by platforms. The Real411 system offered unique information to national efforts aimed at dealing with the COVID pandemic, and it also provided data for university partners to carry out research.  
“Child Influencers” Children as “Motivators for Immunization” in Yemen
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Ansar Rasheed, UNICEF
The "Sponsor a child" initiative was implemented as a pilot project in 8 districts of Aden, Shabwah and Dhale Governorates in the south of Yemen through a partnership with Social Services Center – a community-based partner. The aim was to provide a platform through which children who had completed their full dosage of immunization would encourage other children and adolescents sponsor other children to complete their vaccination dosages. 500 children and adolescents (300 girls and 200 boys) from the age 10 to 17 years were trained on the project mechanism, phases and basic information about the immunization dosages that should be given to children. Training was done to empower the selected children within the community to complement the reach of adult community mobilizers who also mobilize the community to ensure that more children start and finish their vaccinations.  The sponsoring children were linked to the adult community mobilizers who supported to provide guidance and support to the children. The children were provided the list of children who were not fully vaccinated in their communities and accordingly visited their care givers to remind them to take their children to health facility to be vaccinated. The constant follow ups by the sponsoring children led to getting more children fully vaccinated. Over a 18 month period, an additional 4,620 children were fully vaccinated. In 18 months cycle when the sponsoring children began their engagement with other children, on average, each sponsoring child supported 9 other children to start and complete their vaccinations.
LABORATORIO DE COMUNICACIÓN DE RIESGOS: CICLO DE ANÁLISIS DE INFODEMIA A TRAVÉS DE MEDIOS DIGITALES Y ELABORACIÓN DE ESTRATEGIAS DE COMUNICACIÓN DE RIESGOS EN MÉXICO.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
L. Arlette Saavedra Romero, Secretaria De Salud
ELENA MONSERRAT LICONA LEON, General Directorate Of Health Promotion
Co-authors :
Ricardo Cortés Alcalá, Secretaría De Salud
Understanding people’s knowledge, Attitudes, behaviours and practices around COVID-19 vaccination in Iraq.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Aarunima Bhatnagar, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors :
Hadeer Albo Heae, UNICEF
Digital conversations on COVID-19 vaccines in Eastern and Southern Africa: an analysis of infodemic signals and implications for risk communication and community engagement
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Helena Bon, UNICEF ESARO
Massimiliano Sani, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors :
Silvia Sommariva
Social listening on digital platforms is becoming an integral part of health preparedness and response planning. This work analyses online conversations about COVID-19 vaccines in Eastern and Southern Africa region, using a taxonomy developed in collaboration with social and behaviour change (SBC) teams to identify infodemic signals and inform risk communication and community engagement.  The analysis shows how conversations about access and availability of vaccines represented the largest share of engagement over the course of 2021. Conversations about vaccine effectiveness and safety represented the second and third largest share of engagement. Insights from social listening, particularly detection of rumours, concerns and misinformation/disinformation, were shared with regional and country-level partners to inform risk communication and community engagement.   
Addressing misinformation through programmatic feedback loops improves couples’ health seeking behavior in Burundi
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Joanna Kretzer Chun, World Relief
Co-authors :
Prava Chhetri, World Relief
Emily Chambers Sharpe, World Relief
With funding from the John Templeton Foundation, World Relief (WR) implemented a couples-focused Family Planning (FP) intervention in Burundi (2019-2022). The population is more than 98% Christian, and religion shapes couples' interactions, motivations, coordinated action, and FP outcomes. Common barriers for uptake of FP methods include misinformation, religious belief, fear of side effects, and mistrust that prevents couples deciding together about contraceptive use. Working with couples, church leaders, and CHWs, WR's goal was to empower values-based joint decisions around FP. Through formative research, major barriers and enablers for FP were identified and integrated into a story-based curriculum for couples, job aids for faith leaders, and training sessions for CHWs.  WR recruited and trained more than 1300 couples to facilitate couples' groups and worked with faith leaders to integrate FP messaging into couples' counseling, sermons, and existing group meetings through their faith communities. Monthly dialogue groups informed CHWs of the community SBCC efforts, linked the faith leaders' efforts to the couples' intervention, and created a stronger two-way referral system between the SBCC intervention and CHW's FP commodity distribution. The program adapted messaging for the couples' intervention, faith leaders, and CHWs based on emerging understanding of misinformation in communities. New layers of misinformation emerged as community members gained trust over time and shared more openly their taboos and concerns. The feedback loops created by the monthly dialogues provided a critical, timely channel for targeting specific barriers to FP. 
Mobile Interventions for Upscaling Participation and Videos for Agriculture and Nutrition (m-UPAVAN): Measuring feasibility, acceptability and equity
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Peggy Koniz-Booher, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Co-authors :
Emily Fivian, London School Of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Suneetha Kadiyala
Satyanarayan Mohanty, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
The power of norms to drive vaccination in contexts of high misinformation and distrust of public actors
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Mamina Herizo, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Benjamin Soro, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Gerard Epie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Rene Nkenyi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
It is often assumed that behavior reflects belief; in order for behavior to change, stubborn negative beliefs about it must be shifted. This would be particularly challenging to achieve in areas of widespread misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine where trust in public authorities may be low or motivations are questioned. Yet evidence from behavioral science research raises questions about this assumption and our own formative work suggests that normative influences may be sufficiently powerful to prompt vaccination, with or without actually changing underlying negative beliefs. Through in-depth interviews with health providers, community leaders, religious leaders, community members, and other local stakeholders in vaccine roll-out in both Cameroon and Cote d'Ivoire, one strongly emerging insight is that seeing someone you know or can identify with get safely vaccinated can be a powerful driver towards vaccination. Based on our observations we hypothesize that a normative intervention may directly shift negative beliefs but also may nudge some segment of the population towards vaccination without necessarily shifting underlying negative attitudes or beliefs. In either case, this suggests normative interventions will have a critical role to play in vaccination efforts, and also underscores the importance of making vaccines easily accessible to those already motivated to receive it as their actions may have downstream impact on their peer network. We hope to have more insights related to the influence of norms and potential for applications beyond COVID-19 to share from testing and implementation of new behavioral solutions later this year.
Can co-created digital content encourage contemplation, discussion and action for better sexual health among adolescents and young people in Zambia?
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Simon Moore, Avert
Co-authors :
Yael Azgad, Avert
Chanda Mwanda, CIDRZ
Mwila Ng'andu, CIDRZ
Vikwato Kamanga, CIDRZ
Anjali Sharma, CIDRZ
Tech4Families: Addressing the Digital Gender Divide Through Norms-Based, Family Programming
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Co-authors :
Fatima Ibrahim, Equal Access International
Fighting the Spread of COVID-19 Misinformation in Kyrgyzstan, India, and the U.S.: How Replicable are Accuracy Nudge Interventions?
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Lyndsay Gavin, Center For Advanced Hindsight
Joseph Sherlock, Duke University
Swathi Vepachedu
Co-authors :
Sergiu Tomsa, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Galina Solodunova, UNICEF Kyrgyzstan
Lori Foster
Jenna McChesney, NCSU
The spread of misinformation on social media has generated confusion and uncertainty about how to behave with respect to protective actions during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as mask wearing, social distancing, and getting vaccinated. Pennycook et al. (2020) found that asking people to think about the accuracy of a single headline (i.e., accuracy nudge) improved their discernment in sharing true versus false information related to COVID-19. This study sought to replicate the work of Pennycook et al. (2020) and test the generalizability of their findings to three different countries: Kyrgyzstan, India, and the United States. This study also explores whether findings extend to information related to COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, a timely and important topic at the time of data collection. The accuracy nudge's effect did not replicate in the Kyrgyzstan sample (n=1,049). Results were mixed in India (n=703) and the US (n=829); the nudge decreased willingness to share some false information (misinformation) but it did not significantly increase willingness to share true information.  We discuss potential explanations for these findings and practical implications for those working to combat the spread of misinformation online.
Impact of COVID-19 Health Information Consumption on Risk Perceptions, Trust and Adherence to Health Behaviors among Omanis
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Amna Al Abri, University Of Technology And Applied Sciences
From Research to Practice: Lessons Learned for Social and Behavior Change Communication from a Behavioral Insights Project on Routine Immunization and COVID-19 Vaccination in Kyrgyzstan
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Amy Henderson Riley, Thomas Jefferson University
Co-authors :
Waithira Gikonyo, Rain Barrel Communications
Jeffrey Bates, Rain Barrel Communications
Gorana Banda, Rain Barrel Communications
Berik Kozhomkulov, Zerkalo Research Group
Elnura Kazakbaeva, Zerkalo Research Group
Galina Solodunova, UNICEF Kyrgyzstan
Routine immunization rates have been steadily decreasing in Kyrgyzstan and were adversely impacted by COVID-19. In addition, vaccine hesitancy has been increasing, yet a gap exists in understanding locally specific reasons for vaccine hesitancy and how SBCC might be leveraged as a solution. This presentation will share findings from a behavioural insights (BI) project designed to answer: Why do adults in Kyrgyzstan decide not to vaccinate their children (or themselves) and what trusted communication sources might be tapped to decrease vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccination rates? This qualitative project was conducted from 2021-2022 with a series of focus group discussions (FGDs) in urban and rural areas with vaccine hesitant men and women 18+. Larson et al.'s (2015) vaccine hesitancy tool determined eligibility. FGD items were pretested, including tools from the literature on routine immunization and COVID-19 vaccination, and tested messages to gauge reactions and potential for future SBCC interventions. COVID-19 protocols were followed, and participants received a card with the nearest location to obtain the COVID-19 vaccine. The FGDs were conducted in Kyrgyz and Russian, audio recorded, transcribed into English for analysis, and analyzed by multiple coders, including assistance from local team members on cultural interpretation and confirmation of findings. Full results will be shared, with a focus on culturally specific reasons for vaccine hesitancy and implications for SBCC practice, research, and theory. This presentation will add to the growing interest in BI as an approach for addressing routine immunization and COVID-19 vaccination.
CONNECT: An online platform for research field-workers and community-based health workers.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
JAOM FISHER, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit - Vietnam
Trust, clear communication, and understanding between communities and research institutes is essential for effective community participation in research aimed at improving health outcomes. The critical role of research fieldworkers or community-based health workers engaging within communities on behalf of research institutes as 'connectors' to build trust and understanding with potential research participants, is widely recognized (Molyneux, S. et al, 2013). They take on this 'ambassador' role while collecting research data and disseminating health information to community members. The arising ethical challenges and dilemmas of their bridging roles, the impacts on their capacity to effectively communicate and execute their responsibilities, as well as the benefits of their specific roles to research institutes have increasingly been explored and documented (Kingori, P, 2013). Recognising the unique role of this cohort of research professionals, and building on more than a decade of research exploring the ethical dilemmas, engagement challenges and benefits of this role as 'connectors', two Global South research institutes (the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit Vietnam/OUCRU and Kenya Medical Research Institute -Wellcome unit/ KEMRI-Wellcome collaborated with The Global Health Network (TGHN) to develop an online portal called 'CONNECT'. This accessible online resource aims to provide an inclusive space which both professionally recognizes these research roles and supports supervisors/managers who directly resource research field workers and community-based health workers. It aims to make resources freely and easily available to support more equitable access to professional support.  
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Tea Break
Format : Tea Break
11:15AM - 12:45PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Plenary Session - Social and Behavior Change: An Accelerator for the Climate Crisis, Human Rights, and Sustainability
Format : Plenary
Speakers
Sania Ashraf, Rare
Hatim Aznague
Moderators
CAROLINE SUGG, BBC Media Action
More information coming soon!This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Lunch Break
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Karam 1
What's in an AI-powered Dashboard? A Preview of Quilt.AI's Health-Tracking Tools
Moderators
Michelle Gay, Quilt.AI
Grab your lunch and join Quilt.AI as they demonstrate demonstrate how dashboards powered by search data can help you build and monitor behavior change campaigns.This session will run from 1:00 PM to 1:45 PM. Hosted by:
02:00PM - 03:30PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Plenary Session - Town Hall - Future Forward : Open Discussion and Dialogue – Where are We at and What do We Need to Do Better?
Format : Plenary
Moderators
Balqees Shahin
Warren Feek, The Communication Initiative
This will be a participatory discussion, open to all, with no set speakers or speeches - a Summit wide open dialogue on the state of our common field of work (where are we at) and what we need to do to improve our scale, impact and relevance (what should we do). There will be an advance survey to consult participants; gather views and opinions on the major issues we share; and identify possible areas for action. The results will inform the Town Hall focus and structure.This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Poster Space
Poster Presentations
Format : Poster Presentations
Speakers
Kate Thanel, FHI 360
Christian RANAIVO, PSI
Nathalie RANDRIAMANGA , Population Services International (PSI)
Fatuma Namukose, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Douglas Lubowa Sebba, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Socheata Kong , 17Triggers
Abraham Okiror, UNICEF
Catherine Lengewa, Centre For Behavior Change And Communication
Albert Legrand Fosso, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Holly Baker Shakya, UCSD Center On Gender Equity And Health
Shawn Malone, Population Services International (PSI)
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Anja Zinke-Allmang, LSHTM
Reda Sadki, The Geneva Learning Foundation
Toluwalope Ayanwola, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Adenike Ayodele, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Meriam ERRAOUI, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Olayinka Umar-Farouk, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Camilla Osborne, Project Last Mile
Njeri Mbugua, None, Jhpiego
Swathi Vepachedu
Anastasiia Nurzhynska, UNICEF
Maria Kristina Alvarez
Paolo Balderia, Evident Strategic Research And Consulting Inc.
Maryrose Rochelle Caliwan, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Aaron Joseph Aspi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Kirk Dearden, Corus International
Shirley Yan, Noora Health
Adithi Chandrasekar , Noora Health
Margaret Andersen, J-PAL Global
Samuel Wolf, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Demitria Wack, J-PAL
Elhafiz Hussein Abdalla, UNICEF Sudan
Mario Vasquez, UNICEF’s Europe And Central Asia Regional Office (ECARO)
Building Core Competencies of the Social Service Workforce Project in Europe and Central Asia: Implementing a sustainable, community of practice, capacity building model engaging academia, government, and practice sectors
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Mario Vasquez, UNICEF’s Europe And Central Asia Regional Office (ECARO)
Co-authors :
Timothy Hunt, Columbia University School Of Social Work
Lyudmila Kim
Sholpan Primbetova, Columbia University Global Health Research Center Of Central Asia
Ari Holman, Columbia University Social Intervention Group
COVID -19 Health and Social Stigma in Sudan
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Elhafiz Hussein Abdalla, UNICEF Sudan
Chelsi Campbell, Duke University And North Carolina State University
Co-authors :
Lyndsay Gavin, Center For Advanced Hindsight
Eman Eltigani Ali, UNICEF Polio
Samah Elsir, UNICEF
Julianne Birungi , United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Lori Foster
Stigma, a mark of disgrace and disapproval from society, can generate shame and social isolation. Historically, patients with infectious diseases have experienced stigma and discrimination. Further, fear of social stigma, discrimination, and shame can lead sick patients to delay or not seek care for their condition. This research-practice collaboration qualitatively explored experiences with COVID-19-related stigma through interviews and focus group discussions across six conflict or post-conflict regions in Sudan. Data from 69 transcripts were analyzed to understand the lived experiences of recovered Sudanese COVID-19 patients and their surrounding network (i.e., family, community members, healthcare workers).Though often not referred to directly by name, stigma was noted across all participant groups. It manifested in three primary ways: instances of witnessing stigma, experiencing stigma, and of perpetrating stigma. Experiencing stigma can lead to (and was often noted to result in) feelings of sadness, fear, and isolation. Healthcare workers and community members were most likely to report perpetrating stigmatizing behaviors, leading to self-reports of isolating or avoiding stigmatized others. Lastly, witnessing stigma led some to suggest that witnessing stigmatizing behaviors led community members to hide their diagnoses to avoid negative social consequences. Research further supported that support mechanisms are critical to individuals and families affected by COVID-19. Decision makers are encouraged to increase access to psychosocial support services in order to reach those impacted by COVID-19 where possible. This can include using behavioural and community engagement interventions to directly address COVID-19 related concerns.
Using information sharing to improve students’ education: A global evidence review
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Samuel Wolf, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Demitria Wack, J-PAL
Co-authors :
Margaret Andersen, J-PAL Global
Many children struggle to master basic skills despite a rise in school enrollment around the world. For instance, India's 2018 Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) found that only about half of all grade 5 students in rural India could read a grade 2 text. Assessments showed similar results in many other countries. The Covid-19 pandemic, which took 1.6 billion children out of school, further exacerbated this  loss. Programs providing information - about parents' roles in education, school quality, students' academic levels, financial aid, and wage returns to education -  address this lack of learning by making relevant information more available.Results from 23 randomized evaluations from low-, middle-, and high-income countries show that overcoming a gap in knowledge about education often increases parental engagement, student effort, or both, leading to improved learning . Almost all of the programs led to an increase in parental involvement or student motivation, which led to small to medium increases in learning. However, disseminating information has not improved learning levels when key health, financial, or structural barriers persist that information alone cannot overcome, or when the information is discouraging, rather than encouraging, to students.Because information-based interventions are typically very low cost and have been effective in many contexts, policymakers interested in increasing learning outcomes should consider if there are gaps in parent or student knowledge that they can overcome. This presentation will discuss some of the ways that information-based interventions have been successful, as well as implementation lessons.
From Narratives to Actions: How Social Listening Encourages Proactive and Reactive Pandemic Response in the Philippines
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Maria Kristina Alvarez
Paolo Balderia, Evident Strategic Research And Consulting Inc.
Maryrose Rochelle Caliwan, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Aaron Joseph Aspi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Two years after the pandemic hit in 2020, social and behavior change communicators continue to take the cudgels, battling the COVID-19 global infodemic from local and community frontlines. COVID-19 response teams around the world have used social listening to navigate through the public health emergency's complex information ecosystem. In the Philippines, the Department of Health (DOH) is working together with USAID Breakthrough ACTION (BA) to sustain info-awareness initiatives and convey COVID-19 health solutions to various publics. Social listening helped DOH in feedback gathering, measuring its program effectiveness based on public perception and sentiments. Monitoring news and social media provided a holistic understanding of the shifting narratives surrounding public policy and scientific progress in relation to the government's COVID-19 response, enabling communications strategies and messaging to adjust accordingly. Moving from weekly to bi-weekly reporting, challenges on the time gap from data gathering to reporting resulted in limitations in responding to urgent issues. Nonetheless, results still provided insights useful in organizational decision-making. Through a periodic sweep, social listening enables DOH to "go back in time", analyze, and improve its public responses. Moreover, the opportunity is there to explore social listening as a monitoring and evaluation tool to support impact research, lessons learned activities, and after action reviews. 
Impact of Interpersonal Communication Campaign on Knowledge, Attitude, Intention, and Consumption of Iron Folate Acid Tablets and Iron Rich Foods among Indonesian Women
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Kirk Dearden, Corus International
Co-authors :
Joshua West, Brigham Young University
Cougar Hall, Brigham Young University
Benjamin Crookston, Brigham Young University
Mary Linehan, IMA World Health
Scott Torres, IMA World Health
Can phone calls help improve knowledge and behaviours for COVID-19 positive patients under home isolation? An interim analysis of the COVID-19 Care Companion Program in Punjab, India.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Adithi Chandrasekar , Noora Health
Shirley Yan, Noora Health
The intended impact of the program is proper management of COVID-19 symptoms with pre-existing medical conditions like Diabetes,Hypertension etc, prevention of virus spread from patient to others at home and in the community, ability to recognise danger signals early to seek care and Improved outcomes for positive patients.The main idea behind this study was to test the scope of an effective family health education intervention being remote, safe, cost effective and readily scalable, in order to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs for COVID-19.Results from this study indicate that this remote, teletraining counseling program can reduce likelihood of hospitalisations.Amongst those who were trained, there was a 48% less likelihood of hospitalisations compared to those who remained untrained.Further evaluations are needed to understand the pathways and replicability of these findings.
Informed choice challenges for introduction and scale-up of new contraceptive methods and service delivery innovations
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Monica Mutesa, PATH
Co-authors :
Jane Cover, PATH
Ericka Roberts, PATH
Caitlin Corneliess, PATH
Thandiwe Sibulinjase, PATH
Communication de Risque et Engagement Communautaire pour la lutte contre la COVID19 au MAROC : Une collaboration fructueuse entre le Ministère de la Santé et de la Protection Sociale et l’UNICEF
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Meriam ERRAOUI, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors :
Hala Benjelloun Andaloussi, Ministère De La Santé Maroc
Hala Benjelloun Andalousi, Ministère De La Santé Maroc
La stratégie nationale de riposte à la COVID19 au Maroc s'est démarquée au niveau mondial, Le bureau de l'UNICEF au Maroc s'est mobilisé pour appuyer le Ministère de la Santé et de la Protection Sociale (MSPS) et ce à plusieurs niveaux ; en termes de Communication de Risque et Engagement Communautaire (RCCE), plusieurs axes d'intervention ont été identifiés et initiés avec plusieurs départements institutionnels et la société civile :Communication de masse à travers les différents canaux médiatiques et réseaux sociaux en coordination avec les partenaires clés et notamment le MSPS ;Communication interpersonnelle et engagement Communautaire ;L'Engagement des jeunes et adolescent.e.s. à travers la mise en œuvre d'initiatives avec et par les jeunes ainsi que la cocréation de contenus de sensibilisation ;Plaidoyer public pour la réalisation des droits des enfants en situation de pandémie avec la mobilisation de célébrités et enfants défenseurs des droits de l'enfant ;Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs nationaux en matière de RCCE ;La génération d'évidences pour orienter la planification RCCE ;Le développement et la mise en œuvre de partenariats innovants.
Using Behavioural Insights to Understand and Encourage COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance in Ghana
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Swathi Vepachedu
Anastasiia Nurzhynska, UNICEF
Co-authors :
Anna-Leena Lohiniva
Paul Ayiku, VIAMO
Joshua Amo-Adjei, Kantar Public, Ghana
Mrunal Shetye, UNICEF Ghana
Julianne Birungi , United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Joseph Sherlock, Duke University
Lori Foster
Despite the importance of vaccines being well documented (Cella et al., 2020), during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health officials were challenged with people's hesitation to get fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccine hesitancy was identified as one of the top ten global health threats in 2019 (WHO, 2019). As of March 2022, 16% of Ghana's population is fully vaccinated. This two-part study leverages a behavioural insights (BI) approach to detect implicit drivers of vaccine acceptance in Ghana. The proposed BI approach employs a Define, Diagnose, Design and Test methodology. First, a survey administered using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system focused on respondents' vaccination status, their intentions to get vaccinated in the future, self-reported attitudes towards the vaccine, and factors such as perceived risk, social norms, and ease of getting vaccinated. After completing this part of the survey, respondents heard a jingle encouraging them to get vaccinated and were again asked about their intentions. Respondents were randomly assigned to one of six messages, which varied with respect to the messengers portrayed (i.e., healthcare workers, doctors, and religious leaders) and the message framing (i.e., fear, altruism, and social norms). All data have been collected, and at the time of this writing, data analysis is nearing completion, which includes confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), analysis of variances (ANOVA), chi-square tests, multiple regression, and relative weights analysis. The results of this study will play a crucial role in understanding vaccination behaviours and developing effective COVID-19 vaccine campaigns in Ghana.
Building Vaccine Confidence within Communities through Religious and Traditional Leaders: An Example from Sokoto State, Nigeria
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Olayinka Umar-Farouk, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Omolara Oyinlola, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mukhtar Gaya, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Sabyen Sheni, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Isah Fakai, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Even though the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the uptake of vaccines to reduce the effect of Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) across the world, there was a lot of misinformation about its efficacy across different communities in Nigeria. These included conspiracy theories around population control, change of genetic composition, potential to cause sterility, amongst others. This made accelerating uptake of COVID-19 vaccines very difficult especially within rural communities. Sokoto State, which is a religious powerhouse within the country had one of the lowest uptake of the vaccines in Northern Nigeria with only 1.58% of the eligible population having received their first dose as at December 2021. Whereas, Nigeria has a national target of at least 50% uptake of the vaccines among the eligible population by March 2022.Considering the importance attached to religion in Sokoto state, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded Breakthrough ACTION project collaborated with the State's health officials to engage religious and traditional leaders to identify the reasons for vaccine hesitancy, debunk rumors and provide them with accurate information. This helped the religious leaders to develop their own key messages to encourage vaccine uptake within their communities. Through this effort, the number of fully vaccinated persons in Sokoto state increased by five-fold in two months. Identifying and engaging trusted voices such as religious leaders as behavior change agents is critical to improve outcomes of public health responses especially during emergencies, as this helps to build confidence in recommended behaviors.
Coaching as a social behavior change approach to health provider skills building
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Njeri Mbugua, None, Jhpiego
While health provider capacity hampers service delivery in low-resource setting, behavior change interventions can be used to improve skills and knowledge. Many countries rely on didactic training with minimal on-the-job exposure. Coaching as an intervention can help reduce the skills gap while ensuring retention of knowledge among health providers even with exit of funders.
Rishta Na Soch Badlio (Change your mindset, not your relationships): Developing Stigma-Reduction Campaigns for People Living with HIV in District Larkana, Sindh, Pakistan
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Kainat Khurshid, Interactive Research & Development
Co-authors :
Syed Aun Haider, Interactive Research & Development
Usman Ali Ahmed, Interactive Research & Development
Hashmat Jatoi
Mohammad Tahir Sario, Interactive Research & Development
Raja Sarfraz Saroh, Interactive Research & Development
Junaid-ur-Rehman Siddiqui, The Aga Khan University, Pakistan
Mehek Ali, IRD Global
Myra Khan, Interactive Research And Development (IRD)
April 2019 marked an HIV epidemic in Ratodero Town, District Larkana, Pakistan, where over 1100 children were diagnosed with HIV. Previous HIV campaigns have relied upon medicalized messaging, which may have further perpetuated stigma. To address stigma against people living with HIV (PLHIV), a contextualized three-month-long mass communications campaign, Sujaag (meaning 'To-Awaken'), was piloted in Ratodero Town  - the epicenter of the outbreak. Formative research conducted through a survey with 404 respondents, revealed that people held negative perceptions towards children and adults living with HIV (scores of 67% and 69% respectively). Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) revealed that the majority of community concerns were non-medical and centered around the social aspects of the disease. In light of this context, the campaign focused on strengthening social ties for PLHIV: Rishta Na, Soch Badlio (meaning 'change mindsets, not relationships'). Branded local vehicles, interactive social media, and television advertisements, were deployed around this key message.At the campaign's conclusion, 395 respondents were surveyed: 30.3% were exposed to at least one campaign feature. Those exposed had an aggregate score of 72%, reflecting a moderate to high HIV knowledge and perceptions score, compared to 63% amongst those not exposed. Post-campaign FGDs indicated that emphasis on lived realities had an impact on PLHIV and their families' communal lives.Sujaag aligned the campaign to community insights and showcased destigmatizing attitudes via narrative of communities celebrating life together. Contextual campaigns building social capital can address HIV stigma effectively by improving knowledge and perceptions.
Testing Non-Traditional Approaches to Increase COVID-19 Vaccination Rates in South Africa
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Camilla Osborne, Project Last Mile
PLM is a public-private partnership that deploys The Coca-Cola Company's supply-chain management and marketing expertise to support African governments in strengthening access to and uptake of health commodities and services. With support from USAID, since September 2021 PLM has worked with the NDoH in South Africa to improve uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. In the early stages of the COVID-19 vaccine roll-out, NDoH needed to share how, why, and where eligible and willing population segments could be vaccinated. As vaccine roll-out progressed and COVID-19 restrictions relaxed, there was increased complacency and a reduced sense of vaccination as a priority, slowing vaccine uptake rates, particularly amongst young people.Initially, PLM implemented a mass media strategy, reaching an average of 27 million people per month through mass media channels. In early 2022, as vaccine uptake slowed, a need for more targeted interventions emerged. PLM began to test a range of non-traditional platforms to reach and motivate segments with low vaccine uptake, especially focused on youth 12-35Y.These interventions included engaging with TikTok and Radio DJ influencers, nudges and incentives, micro-influencers, and community influencers to spread approved vaccine messaging. The digital format for the campaigns enabled innovative approaches to evaluate the impact of the campaigns.Learnings from the non-traditional platforms tested can offer insights on how to effectively adapt and tailor different communications platforms as risk communications needs evolve, and how to leverage a range of communications interventions to reach specific target groups.
Utilisation de Facebook comme un outil de communication pour la sensibilisation dans la lutte contre le COVID-19 et la vaccination.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Nathalie RANDRIAMANGA , Population Services International (PSI)
Christian RANAIVO, PSI
Le COVID-19 a changé le mode vie avec les confinements et les distanciations sociales obligatoires.  Chacun est resté chez lui tout en essayant de rester connecté aux autres grâce aux réseaux sociaux, notamment Facebook.  Il a été ainsi utilisé comme un canal de communication, notamment dans la lutte contre le COVID-19 et  la vaccination.PSI Madagascar a bénéficié d'une opportunité de collaboration avec Facebook qui a octroyé une formation en ligne pour optimiser l'utilisation de ce réseau social, en tant qu'outil de communication pour le changement social et comportemental dans la lutte contre le COVID-19. Un crédit de communication a été également alloué pour faire des publications boostées. Trois phases de campagnes de communication ont été menées d'Avril à Décembre 2021. A chaque phase, différents constats et leçons ont été tirés afin d'augmenter le nombre de personnes atteintes ainsi que les réactions obtenues.Utiliser Facebook comme outil de communication offre de nombreuses possibilités et avantages comparativement aux canaux traditionnels. En effet, on peut piloter et ajuster plus rapidement les campagnes, comme le choix des visuels, messages, ciblages précis … et surtout avoir une plus grande interaction avec le public.Cependant, dans le cas présent du COVID et de la vaccination, le changement social et comportemental est complexe car il résulte de multiples expériences, influences, croyances et valeurs personnelles. Faire évoluer les attitudes à l'égard des vaccins par Facebook seul est insuffisant. D'autres interventions de communication complémentaires à plusieurs niveaux (masse, personnel, communautaire, institutionnel) sont nécessaires.
Facilitating large scale behaviour change and collective action through DigiRedio Social and Behaviour Change Platform
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Catherine Lengewa, Centre For Behavior Change And Communication
Getting it Right: Scaled Items to Measure Individual Motivation to Seek Out COVID-19 Vaccination
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Kate Thanel, FHI 360
Co-authors :
Mariame Louise Ouattara, FHI PARTNERS
Kouakou Albert Yao, FHI360
Serge Patrick Appia
Dorgeles Gbeke
Holly Burke, FHI 360
Gretchen Thompson, FHI360
Brian Pedersen, FHI360
Across the globe behavioral research is being used to understand what motivates individuals to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Behavioral models and theories ground much of this research but scaled items to measure motivation are not readily available to practitioners. As part of our COVID-19 vaccine demand creation work, FHI 360 developed scaled items to measure elements of motivation based on the BJ Fogg Behavioral Model (FBM). According to the FBM, elements of motivation include hope and fear, pleasure and pain, and social acceptance and rejection.  Using the FBM as a guide, we conducted formative research to understand people's motivation to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Yopougon Est, Cote d'Ivoire. Data from this formative research were used to develop scaled items for each FBM element. We then used cognitive interviews to assess whether the scaled items accurately measured the elements of interest for people in Yopougon-Est.  In this poster, we describe our experience developing and testing scaled items to understand determinants of COVID-19 vaccination uptake in Côte d'Ivoire. We present the final items and discuss strategies for using cognitive interviews to contextualize them. These scaled items can be adapted and used by practitioners to understand motivational factors of vaccine uptake and hesitancy in other contexts. 
U-Report for Risk Communication and Community Engagement – COVID-19 Vaccine Chatbot and Awareness Campaigns in Uganda
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Fatuma Namukose, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Abraham Okiror, UNICEF
Douglas Lubowa Sebba, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Co-authors :
Mandi Chikombero, UNICEF Uganda
UNICEF, together with the Uganda Ministry of Health (MOH) and other partners adopted U-Report as a risk communication tool to help combat the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. U-Report, through polls, alerts, and the COVID-19 vaccine chatbot was used to reinforce key messages on COVID-19 preventive measures, vaccine awareness campaigns, and assessments on vaccine compliance and acceptance.Overall, 135,885 U-Reporters benefited from the RCCE interventions including through the COVID-19 vaccine chatbot, polls, alerts and awareness messages conducted in response to the vaccine hesitancy. Data received from the rapid assessment on vaccine acceptance and compliance polls enabled UNICEF and MOH communications teams to address concerns and safeguard against anti-vaccination rumors and misinformation. U-Report is best positioned for use as a risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) tool during emergencies and disease outbreaks. Dissemination of life saving information and flagging out emerging issues within the communities across the country is another effective use of the tool. The platform is fast, cost-effective, reaches many people at once, and provides opportunities for direct communication with affected people including those in hard-to-reach areas.
Leveraging digital tools to decrease contraceptive misconceptions and increase use among youth in Cambodia
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Socheata Kong , 17Triggers
Co-authors :
Shwetha Srinivasan
Jim Malster, Population Services International (PSI)
Low modern contraceptive use among youth in Cambodia and recognition of young adulthood as a critical period to establish social norms and behavioral patterns led Population Services International's Promoting Healthy Behaviors Activity (PHB), with funding from USAID, to design a digital campaign for youth to provide a safe space for youth in Cambodia to learn about sex and sexuality, prevent unplanned pregnancy and plan for their future. The results of the six month campaign, launched in January 2022, will be assessed through social media data and a pre and post quiz advertised on Facebook at the start and end of the campaign measuring changes in knowledge, attitude and social norms on SRH and modern methods, and misconceptions around FP use.Till date the digital campaign has reached over 800,000 youth. The pre-assessment quiz, completed by 182 youth aged 18-29 years old in Phnom Penh in early 2022, found that only 24% of youth correctly recall the five modern methods of contraception (male condom, pills, injection, implant and IUD). 14% of participants incorrectly stated that use of modern methods will affect future fertility while 19% believed that prior use of an IUD will affect future fertility. 37% of respondents believe that women need their partners approval before using contraception. Youth are a critical priority for SRH SBC interventions and the exclusive use of digital tools and youth-friendly digital touchpoints can provide a sustainable and cost-effective way to raise awareness of SRH issues and encourage use of modern contraception.
Réponses des sciences sociales et actions CREC COVID-19 : Inverser la tendance du faible recours à la vaccination par le personnel de santé en temps de défiance vaccinale au Cameroun
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Albert Legrand Fosso, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
SBCC in a pandemic: Promoting COVID-19 preventive behaviours through the Powerful HANDS campaign
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Toluwalope Ayanwola, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Adenike Ayodele, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Co-authors :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Yahya Disu, Nigeria Centre For Disease Control
Adeola Olunloyo, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Rufus Eshuchi, UNICEF Nigeria
As the national lockdown eased off and people returned to a semblance of their normal life, risk perception decreased as evidenced by a low-level of compliance with non-pharmaceutical preventive measures. To address this, the Center for Communication and Social Impact (CCSI) supported the design and implementation of the Powerful HANDS campaign.The Powerful HANDS campaign was a national, social and behaviour change (SBC) communication campaign in Nigeria, targeted at reducing the spread of COVID-19 by increasing the adoption of non-pharmaceutical preventive measures. It communicated the key message that "the power to stop Covid-19 is in our H.A.N.D.S". The acronym HANDS innovatively depicts the five key COVID-19 preventive actions in a simple manner:H- Have your hands washed or sanitized frequently; A-Always cough or sneeze into your elbow;  N- No going out without a face mask;  D- Distance of at least two arm's length should be maintained; and  S - Stay indoors and self-isolate if you feel sick. This abstract shares learnings from the implementation of the HANDS campaign which include positive behaviour deviants, leveraging on existing structures and engaging persons living with Disability (PLWDs). Key lessons drawn from the implementation of this campaign include managing distrust of the government regarding  Covid-19 through other community structures such as market leaders. Also, in programming for PLWDs, lessons include need to  modify  COVID19 messaging for this group as they might require a human aid thereby rendering physical distancing impossible to practice.
The messenger is the message: The Coach Mpilo model as a true peer approach to addressing men’s barriers to HIV testing and treatment in South Africa
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Shawn Malone, Population Services International (PSI)
Co-authors :
Letitia Rambally-Greener, PSI
Paris Pitsillides, Matchboxology
Nina Hasen, PSI
Formative research under the Mpilo project in South Africa found that a lack of safe, relatable sources of support was a significant barrier to engagement with HIV testing and treatment. In response, we conducted a series of workshops with 82 men, aiming to design 'the right source of support'. The Coach Mpilo model emerged from that process.Coach Mpilo employs men living well with HIV, both clinically and psychosocially, as life coaches to men who are struggling with various barriers. Coaches provide one-on-one mentoring, tailored to each client's needs, drawing on personal experience.The Coach Mpilo pilot showed high acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness. 96% of clients were linked or returned to treatment during the pilot period, of which 95% were retained in care at pilot endline. 16% experienced at least one treatment interruption, though 82% of those returned to treatment during the pilot period.The Coach Mpilo model demonstrates that a PLHIV-led peer support approach can be acceptable, feasible and effective in helping men overcome barriers to HIV treatment and achieving high rates of linkage and early retention. The model also demonstrates that the right messenger is as important as the right message. By leading with personal vulnerability and drawing on lived experience, coaches have been able to break through to their clients in a way that other healthcare providers have struggled to do.Coach Mpilo challenges the conventional wisdom that men are 'difficult' or 'hard to reach'. It may just be that they need the right source of support.
The role of gender, couple communication, and media exposure for vaccine acceptance and prevention among female and male adolescents in Liberia
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Samantha Tsang
Joseph Millward, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
J Ben Kitson , Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Tyler Best, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Lindsey Leslie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Eric Gaye, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Christian Doe, Research Innovation Hub
Saratu Olabode-Ojo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nandita Kapadia Kundu, Vegetarian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
The role of partners, parents and friends in shaping young women’s reproductive choices in Peri-urban Nairobi: A Qualitative Study
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Anja Zinke-Allmang, LSHTM
Co-authors :
Amiya Bhatia, London School Of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Krittika Gorur, Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
Rahma Hassan, University Of Nairobi
Amy Shipow, Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
Concilia Ogolla, Busara Center For Behavioral Economics
Kees Keizer, University Of Groningen
Ben Cislaghi, LSHTM
Contraceptive use among young women in Nairobi remains low despite high general knowledge of family planning methods. This paper draws on social norms theory to explore the role of key influencers in women's FP use and how women anticipate normative reactions or sanctions from partners, parents and friends. This qualitative study was conducted with 16 women, 10 men and 14 key influencers across 7 peri-urban wards in Nairobi, Kenya in 2020. Interviews were conducted by phone and data was organized into themes identified during the analysis. Our findings suggest that women consult various key influencers based on the information they need or the choices they are making in relation to family planning. Women identified parents, specifically mothers, aunts, partners, friends and healthcare workers as their preferred contacts on family planning. Their interactions with key influencers shaped their decisions to use or access FP based on a key influencer's experiences, information and norms they perpetuate or challenge on FP. Our findings have implications for interventions aiming to increase family planning among young women and underscore the importance of network-level intervention delivery, of considering the normative influence key actors have on women's FP choices, and of targeting social norms surrounding family planning use to challenge misconceptions and misinformation.  
Getting ready for COVID-19 vaccination: How a global network of district and health facility health workers formed a global digital network to generate and share success stories to overcome vaccine hesitancy
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Reda Sadki, The Geneva Learning Foundation
Co-authors :
Min Zha, The Geneva Learning Foundation
Charlotte Mbuh, The Geneva Learning Foundation
Ian Steed, The Geneva Learning Foundation
The COVID-19 Peer Hub is the world's largest network of sub-national immunization and other Primary Health Care (PHC) professionals, nurtured by The Geneva Learning Foundation (www.learning.foundation) and connecting  over 43,000 health professionals from 137 countries, across system levels and national and organizational boundaries. More than 80% of participants work in districts and health facilities and over half are government workers. Over four weeks in November 2020, in response to the inadequacy of prescriptive guidelines and descriptions of hesitancy, 734 Peer Hub participants developed, peer reviewed, and revised their own case studies, each one describing and analyzing a situation in which they had used their own, local capacity to help an individual or group overcome initial hesitancy or fear of vaccination, leading to vaccine acceptance. The primary purpose of the case studies was to foster reflective learning between peers, many of whom were likely to become involved in COVID-19 vaccine introduction. This peer learning exercise had startling effects, above and beyond expectations, for individual participants, to strengthen the network they formed, and for their countries' readiness for COVID-19 vaccine. Supporting health workers, already recognized as trusted advisors to communities, requires new ways of listening, new ways of supporting, new ways of measuring, documenting and learning. It also requires new ways of recognizing the leadership of immunization staff who work at the local level under often difficult conditions.
Behaviorally-informed solutions to overcome COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and facilitate uptake across contexts
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Rahin Khandker, Ideas42
Stephanie Levy, Ideas42
Allison Schachter
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Rene Nkenyi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Benjamin Soro, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Lindsey Leslie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Juliet Wilson Gaigaie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
The USAID-funded Breakthrough ACTION project includes behavioral design activities related to COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake across a range of countries, including Liberia, Cote d'Ivoire, and Cameroon, targeting priority populations like facility-based health providers as well as the general population. We leveraged insights from behavioral science and qualitative, contextual investigation in each country to identify key behavioral barriers and channels to vaccination. Given overlapping barriers and channels, several innovative and behaviorally-informed solutions have resonated across country co-creation workshops and are currently being adapted through iterative user testing to their respective contexts. These include a peer invitation to the vaccine, intended to increase the visibility of peers who have successfully vaccinated by prompting people to explain why they got the vaccine and to encourage their peer to get vaccinated as well. Another example is a professional forum in which influential health workers are invited to hear tailored information about the vaccine and have the opportunity to ask questions to a trusted source. We will share insights from the user testing process on how these solutions were received in their respective contexts, and any additional insights from piloting and scale-up to share later this year. While there are differences in specific vaccine concerns and priorities across populations, there are also emerging behavioral insights that continue to resonate strongly across contexts. They can be leveraged immediately to support uptake in LMICs with low vaccination rates and a large "moveable middle" expressing some hesitancy to vaccinate.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Tea Break
Format : Tea Break
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Reda 1
Emerging Authentic Voices
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Children | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Emily Garin, Sesame Workshop
Rhys Abraham Ybiernas, Department Of Health Philippines
Moderators
Tahira Firdous, UNICEF MENARO
Watch, Play, Learn: Educational Media and Sesame Workshop’s Efforts to Support the Future of Early Learning Amid Crisis
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Emily Garin, Sesame Workshop
Co-authors :
Lesley Bourns, Sesame Workshop
For over 50 years, Sesame Workshop has harnessed the power of educational media and Muppets to bring playful learning to children in more than 150 countries. We know play-based early learning is essential for children to build the foundational skills they need to succeed in school and life. Yet millions of children, especially those caught up in conflict and crisis, have little to no access to playful learning opportunities. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this challenge. That's why Sesame Workshop is launching a first-of-its-kind library of globally tested educational content – Watch, Play, Learn: Early Learning Videos – designed to bring playful learning to children everywhere, especially those affected by conflict and crisis. In this Comms Talk, Sesame Workshop will introduce this new global learning resource and offer a behind-the-scenes look at the extensive research, consultation with global advisors, and testing with children and caregivers that shaped the curriculum and design of this content. Sesame will also show a sneak peek clip from the Watch, Play, Learn library and preview our plans to integrate this content into pilot direct service partnerships reaching displaced communities in Bangladesh, Colombia, and Kenya. As we embark on these pilots, Sesame will extend an open invitation to the SBCC community to join us in exploring how educational media can help increase access to early education for all children and support learning continuity during periods of disruption and beyond. 
The Health Promotion Framework Strategy - enabling good health through people and places focused health governance
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Rhys Abraham Ybiernas, Department Of Health Philippines
Co-authors :
Janus Maclang, Department Of Health Philippines
"For a Healthy Pilipinas!"Since the health system's shift to Universal Health Care in the Philippines, the Department of Health (DOH) has been championing a holistic approach in making the nation healthy wherein health-literate and health-seeking individuals, health-enabling settings, and health-supporting governance are present. Using a whole-of-society approach, DOH intends to make healthy behaviors the easier choice for everyone, every time, everywhere.The challenge was to transform the approach towards health promotion and to reorient our programs and services to make health more responsive and equitable. To this end, the DOH formulated the Health Promotion Framework Strategy (HPFS) which serves as the national health promotion roadmap and basis for interventions. To make the HPFS responsive in making Filipinos healthy, three aspects were considered: (a) Priority Areas of health that produces outcomes that cut through most health issues, (b) Strategic interventions following the Ottawa charter to systemically address health promotion, and execution of the Healthy Pilipinas campaign and mechanisms on how the interventions will meet people where they are while also redesigning the settings where they move in.With the strategy laid down, and to target the population that will contribute to the health of the nation in the future, the Healthy Pilipinas campaign was designed to be more youthful, engaging, and purposive. The invigorated approach included National and Localized initiatives that produced policies, local government mentorship programs, private sector engagement, and community mobilization that put the happiness and health of Filipinos at the core of its design.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 1
Building Resilience to Misinformation
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Gender | Misinformation/Infodemic | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Colin Spurway, BBC Media Action
Barsha Chakraborty, Breakthrough Trust
Moderators
Arshmeen Baveja
We Need To Talk About The Intersectional Bystander
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Barsha Chakraborty, Breakthrough Trust
A bystander intervention is a complex process. Any active bystander intervention is an action against the normalisation of violence and accepted social norms, and it's also linked with other discriminatory socio political and cultural factors. If someone intervenes, what happens to the consequences she/he/they face? What do we do with those experiences and behaviours? How can we bridge the gap?
Applying ‘inoculation theory’ with SBCC to build resilience to mis- and disinformation at scale among digital audiences
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Colin Spurway, BBC Media Action
Co-authors :
Alasdair Stuart, BBC Media Action
The spread of mis- and disinformation is happening at a speed and scale not seen before, negatively impacting a range of issues, from elections, conflict and climate change, to humanitarian emergencies and the COVID-19 pandemic. Developing effective SBCC strategies that build people's long-term resilience to mis- and disinformation at scale can help to counter it's negative impacts. One of the most promising approaches is 'inoculation theory', which uses exposure to a weakened 'dose' of common techniques found in mis- and disinformation, along with an explanation of these, to help people develop psychological resistance to mis- and disinformation. Until recently, much of the application of 'inoculation theory' has used gamification, largely within Global North contexts, and has been limited by challenges of scaling. There had been no attempt to combine the promise of 'inoculation theory' with SBCC reaching mass digital audiences. However BBC Media Action is collaborating with the University of Cambridge team behind 'inoculation theory' to pilot this approach in North Africa.This Comms Talk will highlight what we know about mis and disinformation in North Africa and why inoculation theory holds such promise, discuss how it can be incorporated into SBCC interventions and made relevant to different contexts, and provide insights on the efficacy of the approach. The session will provide insights and recommendations to implementers, researchers and funders with an interest in empowering people to guard themselves against the spread of misinformation, and consider what this means for future SBCC efforts to tackle mis- and disinformation. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 2
No Limitations in the Digital World
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Digital/Mobile | Entertainment Education | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Robin Toal, MAG (Mines Advisory Group)
Ehtesham Abbas
Moderators
Colin Spurway, BBC Media Action
Can Public Health Content Go Viral? Lessons from film, drama, animation, and TV Commercials in Pakistan
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Ehtesham Abbas
Introduction: Public health stands at a pivotal moment, shifting from an environment of "not enough of information" to a new era of "too much information" that runs the risk of bombarding audiences. The World Health Organization (WHO) terms this phenomenon Infodemic[1]. As per WHO, an infodemic is too much information including false/misleading information, especially during a disease outbreak. While "Information" was supposed to help break the cycle of an outbreak, an infodemic prolongs/intensifies it because people end up being confused about the appropriate actions to take. Infodemic, while is an outbreak-specific term, misinformation going viral[2] is neither health nor outbreak specific. Are our traditional content and co-creation methodologies prepared to compete with other content including misinformation in the age of information?We at CCP Pakistan would like to measure what can Social and Behaviour Change professionals around the world do to develop content that is both evidence-based and has the potential to go viral so that it can increase impact. What does it take to make popular (viral) content in the digital age? Are the traditional concepts of storytelling, co-creation, creativity, celebrity-casting, segmentation, and interactivity, enough or does it takes more than that?[1]https://www.who.int/health-topics/infodemic#tab=tab_1[2]Viral is a term used to describe an instance in which a piece of content -- YouTube video, blog article, photo, etc. -- achieves noteworthy awareness. Viral distribution relies heavily on word of mouth and the frequent sharing of one piece of content all over the internet.
Overcoming barriers to access with digital explosive ordnance risk education
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Robin Toal, MAG (Mines Advisory Group)
Traditional EORE (Explosive Ordnance Risk Education) takes place face to face, in classrooms, in village halls, under a tree, and has remained largely unchanged for nearly forty years. However, the in-person approach can often be significantly limited by a range of factors. War and conflict mean that conventional EORE sessions cannot take place leaving mine affected communities without vital safety information exactly when they need it most. With conflicts around the world increasingly protracted and located in urban environments, the threat to civilians has never been greater. Culture, extreme weather, and financing can create further barriers to accessing communities while measures against COVID-19 had a serious impact on EORE in 2020. When you live surrounded by landmines it is never safe. But we know that we can save lives by providing people with information on how to recognize a threat, how to stay safe, and how to report explosive ordnance to the local authorities. MAG's engagement with the US State Department and Facebook to develop an innovative Digital EORE Project is spearheading change in an established sector and reached 13.4m people in it's first year across Equatorial Guinea, Iraq, Lebanon, Somalia, and Vietnam. This Comms Talk will outline the journey in using digital tools to disrupt established ways of working and democratize access to help save lives in current and post conflict countries. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 3
Building Disruptive On-Line Communities
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Digital/Mobile | Misinformation/Infodemic | Social Media | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Jamie Arkin, AIfluence
Elodie Ho, WHO- Africa Infodemic Response Alliance
Moderators
Sergina Loncle, Kopernik
How to create an alliance to counter the spread of health mis-disinformation in Africa
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Elodie Ho, WHO- Africa Infodemic Response Alliance
The spread of the COVD-19 pandemic has been followed by unprecedented and repeated waves of dis/misinformation generating what has been defined as an infodemic. This overabundance of information has been amplified by social media and affected the deployment of public health responses, generating fear, anxiety and distrust in local populations about preventive measures and vaccination campaigns.With COVID-19, or any other outbreak, a glut of information can confuse people and fuel behaviours that drive the spread of disease. It can undermine trust in health authorities which hampers public health responses and ultimately prolongs outbreaks. And in Africa, a continent of 1,3 billion people frequently exposed to outbreaks and other health emergencies, countering the spread of misinformation and managing the infodemic are vital measures for public health responses. While different organisations and authorities were developing their own systems to counter the spread of false information, in December 2020 the African regional office of the World Health Organisation launched a new initiative to bridge the knowledge, expertise and capacities from inter-governmental organisations, big data, AI, fact-checking and media organizations to respond to infodemics : the Africa Infodemic Response Alliance (AIRA).AIRA was created to coordinate actions and pool resources to combat dis/misinformation and fill information gaps around the COVID-19 pandemic and other health emergencies in Africa. In March 2021, AIRA launched Viral Facts Africa, a content hub to produce and disseminate digital materials to de-prebunk misinformation.
Using AI and Nano Influencers to Build SBC Campaigns
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Jamie Arkin, AIfluence
Social Media platforms have become a common source for information among people across the world and Social Media penetration in developing countries has increased exponentially throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, with countries seeing increases ranging from 5-30%. With social media playing a larger role in everyday life all over the world, how can SBC campaigns harness its power for good?This talk will focus on how the influencer marketing model can be adapted from promoting brands to building social behavior change campaigns and increasing access to information and use of digital resources. We will discuss AIfluence's model, where we use AI to identify nano and micro-influencers, on existing social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tiktok), to lead campaigns. By using AI to identify and activate the right influencers, this approach is uniquely capable of engaging people who can drive authentic, relatable, and meaningful peer-to-peer conversations at scale.This talk will discuss how and why AIfluence concentrates on micro and nano influencers over celebrity influencers and why their value is so critical in the development sector. The talk will share examples of health campaigns in Africa, focusing on what has worked, how we use the data and conversations with influencers to build rapid feedback loops, and areas for future learnings. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 4
Imagine How Far We Can Go
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Digital/Mobile | Misinformation/Infodemic | Research | Social Media
Speakers
Koye Adeboye, Spotlight Initiative
Marcel Heyne, URIDU
Moderators
Andy Tompsett, U.S. President’s Malaria Initiative / USAID
Influencing social media influencers
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Koye Adeboye, Spotlight Initiative
Do celebrity influencers matter when it comes to ending violence against women and girls? Here's why they can and should.The use of celebrity endorsements for marketing purposes is a long established practice used by brands across the globe. The rise of influencer marketing in the past decade has fueled a global increase in this trend and audiences make buying decisions based on the endorsements of personalities they identify with.From UNICEF's appointment of actor Danny Kaye in 1954, to the UN Refugee Agency's work with Angelina Jolie since in the 2000's, celebrities and public figures have also helped promote various development and humanitarian causes, with varying success. There is limited evidence to show that these engagements effect lasting changes in audience behaviour, especially when it comes to ending violence against women and girls.Can the success of influencer marketing in the private sector be translated into influencer engagement to prevent violence against women and girls?
Freeing Knowledge from Literacy: How Digital Audio can Become the Printing Press for Oral Cultures
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Marcel Heyne, URIDU
It is estimated that 5 billion people in the world are oral learners. We know for sure that 800 million of them simply have no other choice: they cannot read or write. 500 million of these illiterate adults are women.One thing is clear: if we want to create a just world with fair opportunities for all, where everyone can live a life in health and dignity, if we want to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, we cannot rely on the written word. And time is of the essence.In other words, isn't it long past time to free knowledge from literacy? Shouldn't we be creating a Wikipedia for audible knowledge by now?Imagine the possibilities. With digital tools like solar audio players, we can spread audible knowledge literally anywhere. Every day, mobile phones become more affordable, even for poorer sections of the population. WhatsApp audio is changing the way billions of people communicate.Digital audio is the printing press for oral cultures. It has become ubiquitous and offers unique possibilities. We can make health knowledge available everywhere. We can develop contents not only for, but with marginalized populations. We can keep indigenous knowledge and languages alive. We can give a voice to the marginalized.For this reason, we started developing Audiopedia in 2016. Audiopedia (www.audiopedia.org) is a digital public good for accessible, audible knowledge. It combines a collaborative, wiki-based platform for localized SBCC audio information with conveniently accessible hardware and software. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 5
Using Smart Phones Smartly
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Social Media
Speakers
Victor Orozco-Olvera, World Bank
Abhishek Pandit, The University Of Chicago
Laurence Warner, SavvyIndie.com
Moderators
Erwin Fisser, Aidsfonds
Improving Enrollment and Learning Through Videos and Mobiles: Experimental Evidence from Northern Nigeria
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Victor Orozco-Olvera, World Bank
Co-authors :
Ericka Rascon-Ramirez, Middlesex University London
Before COVID-19, there were over 60 million children out-of-school in developing countries; and in sub-Sahara Africa, 87 percent of ten-year-old children were learning-poor. Demand-side and home-learning solutions in rural, low-literate and traditional societies remain greatly overlooked by policymakers and researchers.Through a cluster randomized control trial, we tested two components of a 5-day intervention targeting 6-9-yo girls and boys and their parents in northern Nigeria. These components consisted of community video screenings to reshape parental aspirations and attitudes towards education, and a mobile app add-on to improve learning. After 12 months, community screenings decreased out-of-school children by 42 percent but did not improve learning. In half of the treatment communities, we provided an add-on where a third of attending households received a smartphone pre-loaded with gamified and digital library apps. This combined intervention increased literacy and numeracy skills by 0.18 and 0.33 standard deviations. The intervention worked for both girls and boys, with effects generally being the same. Finally, the combined intervention had spillovers on non-targeted children, where we observe an increase in literacy and numeracy skills (0.15 and 0.26 SDs), and on adolescents a decrease in parenthood (13%) and early entry into the labor market (14%). Our results suggest that combining aspirational videos with engaging apps could be a cost-effective tool for home-learning and development initiatives targeting rural, low-literate and traditional societies, where the evidence base remains scarce.
From Digital Divide to Digital Wellness: Post-Pandemic Lessons for Youth Engagement Strategies on Social Media
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Abhishek Pandit, The University Of Chicago
Laurence Warner, SavvyIndie.com
Young people love using their smartphones. But increasingly, the phones are using them. Addiction to social media such as Facebook, as well as exposure to hate speech through their content have already emerged as a potential threat to mental health in developed countries. Post-pandemic SBCC initiatives for the youth of the developing world must therefore include some aspect of Digital Wellness training. Before the pandemic, the average American spent 4 hours staring at mobile screens, with 60% of their youth diagnosing themselves as addicted. Several studies in both OECD and BRICS nations - including our Fullbright-funded research at the University of Chicago - demonstrated these harmful effects, such as reduced self-esteem via exposure to social media. In 2020, 1 in 4 youth reported exposure to hateful or racist comments.These dangers become even more pertinent for emerging economy countexts, where development agencies advocate connectivity on the grounds of economic opportunity. This myopic approach overlooks the dangers to young internet users, at least 76% of whom access social media, and may be exposed to disturbing propaganda campaigns in their ethnically and linguistically diverse societies. In this session, we will connect stories of pre-pandemic youth outreach strategies (at nonprofits in Kenya and India) with an insider's look at the latest content moderation initiative at Facebook's headquarters. Through this novel perspective on Digital Wellness, we aim to discover practical answers and deeper questions to help ensure that even in our increasingly fractured world, smartphone users emerge as phone-smart.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 1a
Systems Thinking for Innovative, Local Solutions
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE) | Human-Centered Design (HCD)
Speakers
Shazeeda Bhola, Nucleus Impact
Miguele Issa, Nucleus Impact
Gena Cuba, Nucleus Impact
We are in the midst of a fundamental shift where conventional ways of identifying and solving problems are falling short of changing uptake of primary health services. The interconnected nature of social norms, behavior change, health systems and community systems requires multidimensional tools to both diagnose and intervene. This points to a need to think in systems of root causes and systems of solutions.Systems thinking and systemic design, key methodologies in human-centred design, provide a solution-oriented view of challenges in terms of wholes and relationships. The purpose is to activate previously overlooked connections and leverage points, including nudging and normalizing behaviour.The session will introduce hands-on tools to analyze complex challenges and co-create solutions through multiple systems mapping methods. This methodology is uniquely suited for situations where health services are available but a subset of the intended population is not actively seeking them. Therefore, groups will work through example scenarios to increase community uptake of primary health services. It also emphasizes both the perspective and participation of the people we are trying to serve at every step - including the services, institutions and communities that surround and influence them. The session will continually switch perspectives - covering barriers to seeking (caregiver), supporting (leader/family), and supplying (health worker) primary health services and the lives and lived environments surrounding these perspectives. 
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 1c
How to Build Cross-Sector Allies to Strengthen your SBCC Campaign
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE) | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance
Speakers
Sara Isaac, Marketing For Change
So many of today's most urgent social justice issues are "wicked" problems with many contributing actors and factors. How can SBCC be used to attract new, cross-sector allies to strengthen campaigns that address disparities of health and wealth? Join veteran practitioner and climate action organizer Sara Isaac for a 2-hour workshop on how to strengthen SBCC campaign design with "outside-the-box" thinking to identify unexpected cross-sector audiences to support your behavior change goals. Sara will begin with a brief overview of her work with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a national communication framework on the health impacts of climate change and to empower local health officials to identify unexpected allies using the Climate and Health: Guide for Cross-Sector Collaboration handbook. Sara will then lead participants through a series of hands-on activities to build their understanding of how to use SBCC principles to identify and target cross-sector audiences who can address power disparities and structural inertia to advance social justice goals. Participants are encouraged, but not required, to come prepared to discuss an SBCC initiative they are currently designing. Participants will leave the workshop with a campaign design framework for incorporating unusual cross-sector allies into future SBCC initiatives.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 2a
How to Integrate Behavioral Economics into Program Design
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE)
Speakers
Elizabeth Long, DTA Innovation
We know that information doesn't always lead to behavior, that teaching about the benefits of healthy behavior may help an individual want to do something healthy, but there is frequently a gap between that intention and action. Behavioral science principles - specifically behavioral economics - show that the gaps between intention and action are predictable. Since they're predictable, we can identify them and then design programs to account for them, meaning programs that incorporate BE can make it easier for people to act on their intentions to do healthy behaviors. This hands-on, case study-based workshop will do just that - actively build practitioners' capacities in behavioral design by showing how to apply behavioral economics to improve (1) understanding of human behavior and (2) program design, as well as how they can lead their clients through a similar process for improved co-design. The workshop will lead participants through a behavioral case study of their choosing using open-source materials in behavioral economics that are not widely used in global health. The first hour of the workshop will show participants how BE principles will increase their understanding of behavior and how to identify the predictable gaps between intention and action. In the second hour participants apply BE principles to program design to overcome or mitigate the predictable gaps and move their clients to action. By the end of the workshop, attendees will have designed their own rough intervention to address a specific outcome and behavior they want to improve using behavioral design.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 2c
Empowering Teens to Investigate Pressing Social Issues and Advocate for Change
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Behavioral Economics (BE) | Digital/Mobile | Inclusion
Speakers
Aparna Ramakrishnan, Devi Partners
Amadea Britton, US Centers For Disease Control And Prevention
Tim Nguyen, World Health Organization
Theresa Senft, Macquarie University
Daiva Yee, US Centers For Disease Control And Prevention
Tina Purnat, World Health Organization
Elisabeth Wilhelm, Center For Disease Control
How can young people be empowered to understand social issues affecting their communities and use evidence to advocate for change? This workshop guides participants through how to conduct a rapid community online interaction analysis (RCOIA) to work with young people on gathering community insights on a public health or other social issue and developing evidence-based recommendations for public authorities. As part of the workshop, we will share the RCOIA toolkit developed in partnership with the World Health Organization.A first principle of the RCOIA is that researchers need to collect and analyze data in spaces where marginalised groups feel most comfortable expressing themselves. A second principle is that group members must lead efforts to study, report on, and recommend interventions for their own communities; this is particularly true for young people, who are often excluded from having a voice in policy decisions.In this workshop, academics, public health professionals, and others working in social and behavior change learn: (1) How to design and deliver a "crash course" for young people on classic behavioral research and digital methods; (2) How to guide young people as they manage fieldwork, articulate findings, and develop recommendations; and (3) How to center young people as drivers of advocacy efforts by helping them to share their findings and recommendations with decision makers. This workshop will use examples from a project using RCOIA methods to build adolescent vaccine confidence and demand but the skills can be adapted and applied to other social issues affecting young people.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Reda 4
Leveraging What Works. Beyond Idea Generation, Idea Adaptation.
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE) | Human-Centered Design (HCD)
Speakers
Juanita Rodriguez, ThinkPlace
Despite the success of implementing co-design approaches in SBC, there is an innate opportunity that hasn't been yet exploited during the ideation step of a Human-Centered Design process. The idea generation step in the process is where teams practice divergent thinking to think widely and openly about design possibilities. Over the past years, many international development projects have worked with HCD in tackling SBC in health-related challenges. During a multitude of ideation sessions, a wide set of ideas have been generated, some of them, the most interesting and the ones that had the greatest potential of impact were transformed into prototypes and tested with users. After they were tested, some of the prototypes were discarded and only the desirable ones made it for further refinement, testing and only few ones were implemented. This iterative process de-risks the implementation by ensuring that the user validates the intervention before it is scaled-up.Imagine this process taking place in multiple countries, for the same health area and same key populations for many years. Why do we keep generating ideas from scratch if there's potential of adapting successful interventions to ensure the local relevance in different contexts? During this skills-building session, we'll explore a set of methodologies to learn how to strengthen and re-frame ideas, problems, or opportunities in relation to different contexts, social norms, religious preferences, access to resources, etc. 
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Bahia (Mogador)
Generating demand for healthy diets: practical lessons from private sector marketing
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Digital/Mobile | Nutrition
Speakers
Meghan Anson, USAID
Qwamel Hanks, USAID
Shaneka Thurman, USAID Advancing Nutrition Project
Amelia Giancarlo, USAID Advancing Nutrition
Poor diets is one of the biggest challenges facing the world today. Ending poor diets is a goal linked with some of the world's most pressing challenges; bold action is needed from all sectors and actors, even beyond the nutrition community. As producers and policymakers improve the equitable supply of nutritious food, social and behavior change (SBC) practitioners have a critical role to play in increasing demand for healthy diets and food. This requires expanding and refining approaches to create the desire for nutritious foods, which people grow, purchase, and eat.Proven marketing techniques from the private sector can accelerate the impact of SBC activities to better generate demand-and reduce the inequities-in underserved communities. SBC practitioners use many of the best practices already, such as formative research to understand the audience, but they could do more with these marketing techniques, such as identifying key insights to inspire change. This session will give participants a hands-on opportunity to identify and apply insights to generate demand for healthy diets or for any other aspect of healthy living.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Reda 5
Chaque Femme est une Leader. Comment Accompagner les Femmes Rurales à Devenir des Leaders dans un Contexte Très Conservateur/ Every Woman is a Leader: How to Support Rural Women to Become Leaders in a Very Conservative Context
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Gender
Speakers
Valerie Davis, Catholic Relief Services
Michelle Kendall, Catholic Relief Services
Abdoulrazak Harouna Dan Ladi, CRS
Aissata Joséphine Diori, CRS
Cette séance sera offerte en anglais et en français. // This session will be delivered in both English and French.Cet atelier vise à faire découvrir aux participants le curriculum de formation « Chaque femme est une leader ». Le projet « Girma » est mis en œuvre dans le sud de la région de Zinder au Niger. Dans cette zone, les femmes sont peu présentes dans les structures de gouvernance communautaires, et lorsqu'elles sont présentes, elles occupent rarement des postes de leadership. Le curriculum « Chaque femme est une leader » est l'un des piliers d'une approche multisectorielle, dont le but est d'aider les femmes membres des structures à atteindre des postes de leadership. Les effets intégrés de cette formation avec les autres éléments de l'approche multisectorielle ont fait en sorte que pendant sa première année de mise en œuvre, 289 femmes (au lieu des 75 prévues !) deviennent présidentes ou vice-présidentes de leurs structures respectives.Cet atelier est conçu comme une mini « formation des formateurs » de « Chaque femme est une leader ». L'approche principale sera l'« apprentissage par l'expérience », qui permettra aux participants d'essayer en première personne les jeux et les exercices typiques de la formation. A travers une alternance de sessions théoriques et pratiques, suivies par des temps consacrés aux questions/discussions, les participants découvriront la formation, se familiariseront avec ses concepts et approches-clés ainsi qu'avec ses aspects pratiques de mise en œuvre, et auront l'occasion de discuter sur comment ce curriculum peut être adapté à d'autres contextes/projets. L'atelier pourra être facilité en français et anglais à la fois si nécessaire.This workshop aims to introduce participants to the "Every woman is a leader" training curriculum. The "Girma" project is implemented in the south of the Zinder region in Niger. In this zone, women are not very present in community governance structures, and when they are present, they rarely occupy leadership positions. The "Every Woman is a Leader" curriculum is one of the pillars of a multi-sectoral approach, the aim of which is to help women members of the structures to achieve leadership positions. The integrated effects of this training with the other elements of the multisectoral approach ensured that during its first year of implementation, 289 women (instead of the 75 planned!) became presidents or vice-presidents of their respective structures. This workshop is designed as a mini "training of trainers" of "Every Woman is a Leader". The main approach will be "experiential learning", which will allow participants to try out the games and exercises typical of the training in first person. Through an alternation of theoretical and practical sessions, followed by time devoted to questions/discussions, participants will discover the training, become familiar with its key concepts and approaches as well as with its practical aspects of implementation, and will have the Opportunity to discuss how this curriculum can be adapted to other contexts/projects. The workshop can be facilitated in both French and English if necessary.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 3
Breaking Barriers: Reproductive & Sexual Health
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Inclusion | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Cyprien ZINSOU, Association Béninoise Pour Le Marketing Social Et La Communication Pour La Santé (ABMS)
Cathryn Wood, DMI
Roy Head, Development Media International
Hagere Yilma, Boston University
Douglas Nsibambi, FHI360
Moderators
Rebecka Lundgren, University Of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
Self-Advocacy as a Tool for Reducing Health Disparities Among Women of Reproductive Age: The RANI Project Experience from Odisha, India
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Hagere Yilma, Boston University
Co-authors :
Gerardo Rodriguez, Boston University
Margaret Bradley, Boston University
Ichhya Pant, GWU School Of Public Health
Satyanarayan Mohanty, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
Iron-deficiency anemia is a blood disorder that affects more than half of women of reproductive age in many low and lower-middle income countries, including India. Although iron-folic acid (IFA) consumption has been promoted to reduce the burden of anemia, women of low socioeconomic status are disadvantaged by current IFA distribution practices, as these women face disproportionate barriers in seeking IFA from health professionals. The current study aims to understand if shifts in psychosocial factors can positively influence IFA seeking behaviors despite demographic factors, such as caste and education. The study uses data from the Reduction in Anemia through Normative Innovations (RANI) Project to test logistic regression models that predict IFA seeking behaviors across 18 months among women in Odisha, India. We test the effect of shifts in risk perception, outcome expectations, and various social norms (i.e., descriptive, injunctive, and collective) on the likelihood that a women will seek IFA from a health provider. After controlling for significant demographic factors that reflect socioeconomic status, we find that shifts in attitudes, beliefs, and social norms can influence IFA seeking behaviors. Intervention designers who wish to promote IFA consumption among populations with low socioeconomic status may find success by developing strategies to positively impact 1) perceptions around one's own risk of acquiring anemia, 2) attitudes around the outcomes of IFA consumption, 3) perceptions of how many others take IFA, and 4) the true prevalence of IFA consumption within one's own community.
The Media or the Message? Experimental Evidence on Mass Media and Modern Contraception Uptake in Burkina Faso
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Roy Head, Development Media International
Cathryn Wood, DMI
Co-authors :
Matthew Lavoie, Development Media International
Joanna Murray, Development Media International
High fertility rates and short spacing between births are associated with poor health outcomes for women and children. Many women report they would like greater control over timing and spacing of births but are not using contraception. According to WHO, the main barriers to contraceptive uptake in sub-Saharan Africa are lack of information and fear about contraceptives, rather than access to contraception. Mass media campaigns can potentially spread information and disinformation, but their impact is hard to rigorously measure.Using a two-level randomized experiment covering 5 million people in Burkina Faso, we examined the impact on family planning knowledge and behaviors of both, general exposure to mass media (1,500 women received radios) and an intensive evidence-based family planning campaign (8 of 16 radio stations received the campaign). We found that in non-campaign areas, women receiving radios reduced contraception use by 5.2 percentage points (p=0.039). In particular, women with below median fertility preferences showed large reductions in contraception use, moving them closer to community norms. These findings suggest that in the absence of high-quality programming, access to mass media can lead to less progressive attitudes on women's role in society and lower modern contraceptive use.In contrast, in campaign areas contraception use increased by 20% (5.9 percentage points, p=0.046), and women's self-assessed health and well-being increased by 0.27 standard deviations. Although knowledge improved and misperceptions about contraception declined, preferences and norms remained unchanged. A nationwide campaign scale-up cost an estimated US$7.7 per additional contraceptive user.
Expansion des Pouvoirs des Femmes en Matière de Contraception Entre les Sexes : Expérience Pilote d’Introduction du Diaphragme Caya au Bénin
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Cyprien ZINSOU, Association Béninoise Pour Le Marketing Social Et La Communication Pour La Santé (ABMS)
Co-authors :
Alexandra Angel
Ando Tiana RAOBELISON, ABMS - PSI ​ Bénin
Ghyslain GUEDEGBE, Association Béninoise Pour Le Marketing Social Et La Communication Pour La Santé (ABMS)
Au Bénin, la gamme des méthodes contraceptives est très rétrécie, réduisant le choix des potentielles utilisatrices de méthodes de Planification Familiale (PF). Le diaphragme Caya, un contraceptif moderne qui pourrait intéresser des femmes qui cherchent un produit péri coïtal, contrôlé par la femme, réutilisable dans la durée, non hormonal et sans effets secondaires, a été introduit dans le pays en 2020. Le produit a été placé dans deux communes pilotes du pays et une étude mixte a été menée six mois plus tard en 2021. L'objectif de l'étude était d'évaluer l'acceptabilité par les femmes adoptantes, les perceptions des hommes et des prestataires de santé. Il ressorte résultats que les femmes ont manifesté un grand enthousiasme pour la méthode ("Caya m'a vraiment donné la joie") car non seulement elle vient répondre aux attentes de celles désirant de nouvelles méthodes non hormonales, de celles déçues par des méthodes antérieures, mais elle donne la possibilité aux femmes de l'utiliser en temps voulu, sans l'aide de personne, augmentant ainsi leur pouvoir de décision et d'action en matière de PF. Les hommes ayant eu à expérimenter aussi la méthode ont manifesté une attitude favorable ("J'utilise Caya et cela marche correctement…pas d'inconvénient") et les prestataires de santé ont loué le vide que vient combler ce produit dans la gamme des contraceptifs modernes du pays. Avec l'engouement qu'a suscité le diaphragme Caya chez les femmes des zones pilotes, il mérite d'aller vers d'autres zones pour répondre aux besoins d'autres femmes.
Facilitating Collective Capacity for Youth-Responsive Family Planning Services in Uganda Through the Use of a Group Mentorship Model for Provider Behavior Change
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Douglas Nsibambi, FHI360
Co-authors :
Heather Chotvacs, FHI360
Sam Ariko, Marie Stopes International
Peter Ddungu , Marie Stopes International
Ritah Tweheyo, Marie Stopes Uganda
In Uganda, youth, ages 15-24, account for approximately 20% of the total population and are coming of age in a country with one of the highest total fertility rates in the world and limited access to youth-responsive health services for family planning (FP). Participatory insights gathering and co-design sessions conducted by FCDO/Reducing high fertility rates and Improving Sexual Reproductive health outcomes (RISE) with youth and providers revealed provider stigma and bias, limited client-centered counselling, and negative clinical experiences were key barriers affecting youth's demand for and utilization of FP services. These barriers create inequalities in FP access and use, which adversely affect the health, economic, and social develop of youth.To strengthen the health system to be more responsive to the needs of youth, RISE is implementing a comprehensive provider behavior change (PBC) initiative, using a group mentorship model centered on experiential learning and collective problem solving, coupled with tailored support supervision. Unlike traditional trainings, the group mentorship model puts providers in the driver's seat, letting providers identify current needs and gaps to improve upon at the beginning of the mentorship, and then using discussion and collective problem solving to identify best practices to address those needs and gaps. Since the initiative's launch in 2021, RISE has observed and reported improvements in providers' counselling skills, client-centered care, and provider attitudes towards youth accessing FP services.In this presentation, we will present our model, its impact, and how it can be adapted to support PBC in other contexts.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 5
Scaling Social Impact
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Research
Speakers
Most public health interventions are siloed and do not match demand creation with supply of innovative life saving products. Although Social and Behavior Change Communication is focused on the demand side, it is imperative to understand and explore supply side challenges in the communication strategy to ensure that the behavior change outcomes are sustainably achieved. CCP conducted research on behalf of Unilever in 2020 to understand key factors for successfully scaling social impact. The approaches included case studies of behavior change interventions in Indonesia, South Africa, Uganda, Tanzania, India and net mapping and latent class analysis of over 800 micro retailers in Kenya.The research results revealed that key pillars for scaling included Competitiveness, Capacity, Capability, Communication & Collaboration (The 5 Cs of Scaling).The recommendation was a pathway for scaling behavior change which included Mapping key influencers in the ecosystem, Positioning for optimum diffusion of desired behaviors and Gearing supply to match the exponential growth in demand summarized as the MPG(Mapping, Positioning, Gearing) framework.The 5Cs and MPG frameworks provide systemic tools for planning sustainable behavior change and a common language with collaborators that balances both demand and supply side dynamics that will ensure equity, access and affordability of health products and services.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Lexus (Mogador)
Has Digital Killed the Entertainment Education Star?
Format : Blue Skies Presentation
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE) | Entertainment Education
Speakers
Sanjanthi Velu, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Martine Bouman, Center For Media & Health + Erasmus University
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Part of Entertainment Education's power for behavior change is how the audience can come to care about characters, identify with them, mentally rehearse to modeled behavior and begin to emulate it. Many programs globally have proven this concept. A 2018 Summit theme was how the EE experience could be deepened by social media/transmedia approaches that extend the ways audiences can encounter and engage with the characters in more traditional EE formats. Instead, short form social media are becoming the preferred medium instead of, not in addition to, mass media-based story telling. Why? Are they less expensive/time intensive to produce? Are producers pandering to shorter audience attention span? What effect does this have on the processes of identification, empathy, and narrative cohesion? What is lost in translation to these newer approaches and what is gained? Are these formats simply raising issues but not allowing a purposive story to unfold or do they put narrative construction into the hands of audiences to develop according to their own needs? Does this enhance or undermine how audiences view the complexity of behavior? Does this affect how learning leads to action? How should EE continue to evolve in the new digital environment?
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 1
Meeting Youth Where They Are: Digital Strategies that Motivate
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Inclusion | Research
Speakers
Cassia Ayres, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Iddi Iddrisu, UNICEF Ghana
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
Moderators
Shaping a Theory of Change for a Strategic Pathway to Empower Girls’ Choices Through Digital Media
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
LALITA SHANKAR, Howard Delafield International
Co-authors :
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
Digital games have not had much exposure within the SBC realm. Go Nisha Go™, the first of a suite of games from The Game of Choice, Not Chance™ initiative, aims to shift norms and empower underserved girls 15-19 in India. It was built on a Theory of Change (TOC) foundation of multiple theoretical frameworks and Identifying and applying multidisciplinary pathways to change is particularly of interest to measure impact of SBC innovations, especially digital products that do not easily conform with traditional behavioral change models or standard co-design approaches. The hypothesis which the theoretical foundation supports is as follows: if girls virtually experience the outcomes of choices they make for their avatar in the mobile game, then they can make informed decisions that direct the course of their own life. Four learning pathways scaffolded on three pillars of evidence, engagement, and evaluation support a multi-layered TOC-led framework, which informs the impact of decision-making and life outcomes, through game-based objectives and in-game triggers that offer direct access to information, products, and services. This novel approach to SBC will empower girls' voices through digital media.
How Mobile Platforms Empowered Young People on ASRH in the Period of Global Pandemic: The Case of AgooSHE+ in Ghana
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Iddi Iddrisu, UNICEF Ghana
Co-authors :
Anastasiia Nurzhynska, UNICEF
Siobhan Burnette
Mobile phone technology provides extraordinary opportunities to reach out to a large audience with a medium which is very popular among Ghanaians, especially young people. In Ghana, mobile ownership is almost universal as more than 9 in 10 Ghanaian households have access to mobile phones. Digital Ghana reports that as of January 2021, the number of mobile connections in Ghana was equivalent to 132.8% of the total population. 'AgooSHE+' is a mobile platform which attempts to provide greater access to reliable information for young people via Interactive Voice Response (IVR), Short Messaging (SMS) and live agent response. The creation of the platform was the result of a partnership between UNICEF, VIAMO, Savana Signatures (an IT and youth-based NGO) and MTN, the largest mobile telephone operator in Ghana. The setting up of the platform using telephone technology responded to the need for delivering tailored, personalized, updated, and accurate information to people at the time they want it, at the place where they are and in the language they speak. While access is provided free of charge to all MTN users who dial 5100, the service can also be accessed by all other mobile networks by dialing 0540-118-999. AgooSHE + was co- designed with the urgent need to provide young people the opportunity to either directly access information in six (6) local languages through the IVR functionality or interact with multi-lingual professionals in health and other social issues, who provide counseling and referral services.
Programmatic Opportunities and Limitations of Big Data and Digital Feedback: Insights from Evaluating a Large-Scale Multimedia Smoking Intervention Among Adolescent Girls in Ghana
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Lois Aryee, Ideas42
Ariadna Vargas, Ideas42
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Political Participation, Digital Activism and Social Changes in SBCC: The Perspective of Young Citizens
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Cassia Ayres, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Reda 1
From PrEP to "Test and Treat": SBCC to Improve HIV Outcomes
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Gender | Research | Social Media
Speakers
Tham Tran, PATH
Eniko Akom, HJF
LULU MSANGI, USAID/Tanzania
Shawn Malone, Population Services International (PSI)
Moderators
Alexander Kyerematen, Global Fund For Children
Lynn Van Lith, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Getting Behind the Mask: Traditional Gender Norms and Stereotypes as a Barrier to HIV Testing and Treatment Among Young Men in South Africa
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Shawn Malone, Population Services International (PSI)
Co-authors :
Letitia Rambally-Greener, PSI
Sunny Sharma, Ipsos Healthcare
Nina Hasen, PSI
The Mpilo Project conducted research in South Africa to better understand HIV-related attitudes and behaviors among young men and found traditional gender norms and stereotypes to be a significant barrier to HIV testing and treatment. Efforts to increase men's health-seeking and engagement with the health system often begin with assumptions and stereotypes about men's barriers and needs. We engaged with men directly, using a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods, to better understand their attitudes and behaviors and enable better tailoring and targeting of services.Our central research insight was that while men may feign indifference about HIV, behind that mask many are paralyzed by fear, which can lead healthcare providers to misread their emotional state and engage in ways that are unhelpful. Healthcare providers may also assume that men's barriers are primarily functional, whereas men also noted social and emotional barriers, and that men are uninterested in or incapable of accepting support, whereas men reported being eager for support but finding no safe and relatable sources.Within the public health sector in South Africa, the prevailing view of men remains largely undifferentiated and one-dimensional, leaning heavily on traditional gender norms and stereotypes. To engage and retain more men in care, we need to recognize men as complex human beings whose attitudes and behaviors are influenced by a range of practical, psychological, and social factors. We also need to promote a process of transformation in gender norms that makes it acceptable for men to express emotion and seek support.
Impact of a Multi-Year HIV Prevention, Care, and Treatment Campaign on Key Behaviors and Their Determinants: A review of Tanzania’s ‘Furaha Yangu’ Campaign
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
LULU MSANGI, USAID/Tanzania
Co-authors :
Joseph Msofe, FHI360
Mark Lwakatare, FHI360
Michael Luvanda
Waziri Nyoni, FHI360
Hassan Chaula, FHI360
HIV is stigmatized in Tanzania, with those at risk often declining testing due to the perception that a positive result is a death sentence and result in rejection by their family, friends, and community. Tanzania's Test and Treat policy began in 2017, with an estimated 52% of the 1.4 million Tanzanians living with HIV knew their status. This presented SBC programs with an opportunity to address barriers to HIV testing, normalize treatment, and accelerate progress towards 95-95-95 goals. Through rigorous SBC campaign development process, key emotional drivers and motivators for HIV testing and treatment behaviors were identified, which informed the focus of the campaign's messages and SBC interventions. These were: deep desire to belong, need to be in control of one's life and health status and reinvention of a better life. The four years of the campaign's implementation, 'Furaha Yangu' achieved national reach, tackled stigma, normalized HIV as a chronic and manageable condition, and improved key determinants and behaviors of HIV. By drawing upon positive motivators, campaign positively transformed audiences' attitudes towards testing from 50% at baseline (2018) to 91% in year four (2021). For the same time period, it increased awareness of the availability of treatment immediately after testing positive from 49% to 74%; HIV risk perception among high-risk groups from 34% to 44% and condom use during last risk sexual intercourse among youths 15-24 from 21.6% to 33.2%. The campaign showcased the power of emotional messages and SBC in catalyzing and normalizing HIV testing.
“My Eighteen-Year Old Girl Will Start Going in for Men, Knowing She Can’t Contract HIV”: Ugandan Health Care Workers’ Knowledge and Attitudes on PrEP – a Mixed Methods Study.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Eniko Akom, HJF
Co-authors :
Xiaofang Song, HJF
Sanyukta Mathur, Population Council
James Matheka, MUWRP
Grace Mirembe, MUWRP
Hannah Kibuuka, MUWRP
Despite its availability, few people start using PrEP, partly because healthcare providers are not offering it systematically. In this PEPFAR-funded study we explored PrEP-related knowledge and behavioral characteristics of healthcare providers from Mukono, Uganda, to better understand provider prescribing practices.We used a mixed methods approach to collect data from a convenience sample of healthcare providers working in Mukono district between August 2018 – February 2019. A quantitative survey collected data on PrEP knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, perceived social norms, and intention to use and to prescribe PrEP. Descriptive analysis was conducted and independent associations with the outcome variable – intention to prescribe PrEP – were identified through logistic regression. Qualitative data was collected from 19 providers through two focus group discussions (FGDs) using a semi-structured discussion guide.Among the 100 providers who completed the questionnaire, almost all heard of PrEP, but only 10% had perfect knowledge of PrEP, potential side effects being the least well known. Mean scores varied from 2.6/4 for beliefs related to PrEP to 3.8/4 for intention to offer PrEP. Perceived social norms and intention to use PrEP were independently associated with the intention to offer PrEP. The main challenges to PrEP dispensing, as identified in the FGDs, were social norms, adherence, and the risk of STIs and unwanted pregnancies.The participating providers expressed willingness to prescribe PrEP to young female sex workers, but persistent gaps in knowledge, erroneous beliefs, and perceived social norms suggest that further training and social and behavior change interventions are needed.
Leveraging Community Influencers to Co-Create and Co-Implement HIV Communications: Experiences from Vietnam’s 2021 “PrEP Ambassadors” Campaign
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Tham Tran, PATH
Co-authors :
Kim Green, PATH
Ha Nguyen, PATH
Thai Phan
Zoe Humeau, PATH
Trang Ngo, USAID
Mai Chau Vu Hoang, Bien Viet
Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective daily medicine that people at risk for HIV can take to prevent HIV transmission. While PrEP services have been rapidly expanded in Vietnam since 2017, coverage among transgender women (TGW)-a key group affected by HIV in Vietnam-remains suboptimal due to important gaps in PrEP awareness and access. In early 2021, the USAID/PATH Healthy Markets project assisted the Vietnam Network of Transgender People (VNTG), a TGW-led social enterprise, and Bien Viet PrEP clinic (a popular HIV and primary health care clinic in Hanoi) to work with communities in conceptualizing and designing a virtual "PrEP Ambassadors 2021" campaign aimed at boosting PrEP promotion among TGW and other HIV key affected populations (KP) during Vietnam's severe fourth wave of COVID-19. The campaign was implemented nationally from June to July on TikTok and other popular digital channels including Facebook, YouTube, and dating applications. At the center of the campaign were short PrEP promotional videos developed by KP-influencers themselves and posted on a dedicated TikTok page. Thanks to the large mobilization of influencers, more than 60 TikTok clips were produced and shared widely alongside three community-led livestreams and other online content. At the end of the campaign, ten "PrEP Ambassadors" were identified as community champions and the PrEP communication content had reached 80,000 viewers, underscoring the impact of community co-created and innovative public health messaging.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Reda 2
Social Influence Strategies to Reduce GBV
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Inclusion | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Cari Jo Clark, Rollins School Of Public Health, Emory University
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Binita Shrestha, The Prevention Collaborative
Binita Shrestha, Prevention Collaborative
Holly Baker Shakya, UCSD Center On Gender Equity And Health
Floriza Gennari
Moderators
Mohammed Abusulaiman, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Engaging Bystanders to Prevent Sexual Harassment in Public Transportation: The Impact of a Mexico City-based Pilot Project
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Floriza Gennari
Co-authors :
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Karen McDonnell, George Washington University
Jeffrey Bingenheimer, The George Washington University
Understanding the Associations of Social Network Characteristics and Interpersonal Social Dynamics with the Experience of Intimate Partner Violence in Rural Nepal in the Context of an SBC Violence Prevention Intervention
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Holly Baker Shakya, UCSD Center On Gender Equity And Health
Co-authors :
Shweta Tomar
Abbie Shervinskie
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Binita Shrestha, The Prevention Collaborative
Prativa KC
Cari Jo Clark, Rollins School Of Public Health, Emory University
In Nepal, gendered norms around dominance, aggression, and the sexual rights of husbands over their wives are entrenched, with over half of young married women reporting intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime. In these communities, Nepali women bear responsibility for domestic tasks, have limited agency, and are expected to tolerate violence for the sake of family unity and honor, while Nepali men are seen as natural aggressors, and hold the majority of decision-making power in a household. We will be presenting baseline data collected from 1130 couples (both wives and husbands interviewed separately) as part of an SBC program to test an IPV prevention strategy aimed at transforming negative gender norms and diffusing new norms and behaviors through movement building across rural communities in Nepal. Survey questions include measures around social norms, attitudes, and behaviors specific to IPV, plus a social network module. We found that women who reported IPV nominated more social network partners and that the composition of their networks was different than those of women who reported no violence. Women who reported violence were more likely to nominate those outside their homes than those who did not. There were also significant community level differences, suggesting strong normative influences by community.
‘Changing Change’: Adapting an Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Intervention in Nepal to Focus More Intentionally on Organized Diffusion
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Binita Shrestha, The Prevention Collaborative
Binita Shrestha, Prevention Collaborative
Addressing social norms is increasingly recognized as key to sustained and transformative social and behavioral change in many development areas. However, social norms interventions are frequently criticized for being high-cost, intensive and difficult to scale. Evidence supporting the best strategies to measure and track norms change at the community level is also minimal, leaving researchers and practitioners without effective tools and processes to both determine and deepen the impact of and pathways to larger-scale norms change. In this presentation we will highlight how we were able to integrate learnings and adapt an SBCC intervention focused on the prevention of intimate partner violence in Nepal to more intentionally focus on organized diffusion. Our methods included using quantitative analysis to identify changes and patterns that more traditional sampling methods miss, developing a social network analysis tool to more effectively target and trace the impact of social norms-oriented SBCC programming, and integrating "diffusion-focused" sessions in an IPV prevention program curriculumOverall, the presentation will highlight different techniques used to both measure and accelerate the spread of gender equitable norms through a community in rural Nepal - resulting (in one trial) in the declaration of Nepal's first violence free community.
The Role of Diffusion in Social Norms Change: Results from the Change Starts at Home Trial
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Cari Jo Clark, Rollins School Of Public Health, Emory University
Co-authors :
Brian Batayeh
Binita Shrestha, The Prevention Collaborative
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
Prabin Nanicha Shrestha, The Asia Foundation
In response to the well-recognized burden of intimate partner violence (IPV), there has been a growth in primary prevention strategies with an emphasis on norms change as an approach to widespread and sustained prevention. Norms and diffusion theorists believe only a small group of "trendsetters" may be needed to reject a standing norm and to effect change. However, research into how norms change, particularly diffusion from a group to a community, is limited. We address this gap by examining the diffusion effects of an existing norms change intervention, the Change Starts at Home project (Change) to provide novel insights into the pathways of change that will be of immediate use to the field. In this study, we use data from the Change trial to examine the community and programmatic characteristics associated with social norms change with a special focus on diffusion as a lynchpin of social norms interventions.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 2
Using Digital Media to Counter Misinformation
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Digital/Mobile | Misinformation/Infodemic | Social Media
Speakers
Patnice Jana, UNICEF
Abu Md Akteruzzaman Bhuiyan, Pathfinder International
Saiful Hasan, Pathfinder International
Myra Khan, Interactive Research And Development (IRD)
Aimee Barnes, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Anna Mysliwiec, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Moderators
Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Helen Keller International
Fake News or Reliable Source? Testing Strategies to Counter Misinformation
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Aimee Barnes, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Anna Mysliwiec, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Misinformation is a growing, global issue – impacting outcomes ranging from whether citizens receive accurate public health guidance to citizens' ability to make informed choices at the ballot box. The widening reach of digital media and communication platforms has created unprecedented opportunities to target misinformation to citizens at low cost. Social media manipulation by political actors is prevalent in more than 80 countries, with misinformation being produced on an industrial scale by federal governments, candidates and political parties, and private firms. These campaigns can influence individual decision-making, undermine democracy, and even contribute to political and intergroup violence.Platforms, policymakers, and practitioners have all promoted a range of fact-checking services, media literacy trainings, content warnings, and other programs or tools to slow the spread and influence of misinformation. While there is an extensive literature on the impacts of providing citizens with accurate information about candidates and the electoral process, there is limited rigorous evidence on what programs are effective in combating misinformation that voters may encounter.This session will discuss recent contributions to our understanding of what does and does not work to combat political misinformation, highlighting randomized evaluations on fact-checking and media literacy training programs in India and France as case studies. Further, the session will summarize relevant policy lessons from the voter information campaign evidence-base that could be applied when designing interventions to combat misinformation. The session will conclude with a discussion of the substantial remaining evidence gaps around misinformation and directions for future research.
Jeelo Dobara (Live Life Again): Co-Creating a Community-Driven Digital Movement to Enhance COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence and Uptake in Karachi, Pakistan
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Myra Khan, Interactive Research And Development (IRD)
Co-authors :
Kainat Khurshid, Interactive Research & Development
Asad Mujtaba Taj, Interactive Research & Development
Raviya Mysorewala, Interactive Research & Development
Syed Aun Haider, Interactive Research & Development
Fariha Parvaiz
Misbah Baig, Interactive Research & Development
Gulshan Nazeer, Interactive Research & Development
Ubed Ur Rehman Memon, Interactive Research & Development
Anokhi Shaheen Khanum, Interactive Research & Development
Mehek Ali, IRD Global
In Pakistan, impediments to bolster vaccine confidence can be traced to endemic misinformation, conspiracy theories, and lack of awareness and access. Social media extensively facilitated the spread of unverified information. Jeelo Dobara (meaning 'Live Life Again') is a community-driven online movement co-creating critical dialogue, enhancing COVID-19 vaccine confidence, and uptake through vaccine camps in three high-risk districts of Karachi; South, East, and Korangi.Jeelo Dobara utilizes user-informed and generated content to co-create digital dialogue. The movement, via creation of six online communities on WhatsApp and Facebook, provides virtual safe spaces fostering crucial conversations. The digital spaces are complemented by participatory community engagement activities. Jeelo Dobara has invested in and developed a volunteer-grassroots leadership team, connecting communities to on-ground activities, such as Theater of the Oppressed performances, awareness sessions, and to program's digital communities - scaling reach and influence. Till date, over 50 grassroots leaders and 800+ members have joined these online community spaces. 2000 people have been engaged in critical conversations via on-ground engagement; where COVID-19 related myths, concerns, and queries have been raised and discussed. Our field-team and digitally savvy grassroots leaders are encouraging community members, leading critical contextualized conversations, and co-creating content through various engagement mechanisms; including online competitions, influencer engagement, and personal stories. Up till now, 654 people have availed COVID-19 vaccinations via mobile vaccination drive. Jeelo Dobara highlights an opportunity to combine community engagement and digital communications to create grassroot movements and amplify community voices.
Priming Adolescents for Family Planning and Sexual and Reproductive Health using Digital Health Tools: Experiences from 10 Years of Digital Intervention in Bangladesh: Findings from A Landscape Analysis
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Abu Md Akteruzzaman Bhuiyan, Pathfinder International
Saiful Hasan, Pathfinder International
Co-authors :
Asif Aziz, Pathfinder International
Marufa Aziz Khan, Pathfinder International
Fatema Shabnam, Pathfinder International
Liaquat Ali, Pathfinder International
Adolescents in Bangladesh, particularly the unmarried ones, faces certain challenges to access SRH information and services from a variety of reasons, and thus are prone to misinformation and disinformation, resulting in harm. To circumvent, digital health tools in varying capacity have been tested and scaled up. USAID AUAFP project in 2020 conducted an analysis of such interventions in Bangladesh within the last 10 years to adequately inform the design of a digital health initiative for FP and SRH information targeting adolescents and youth in Bangladesh. Based on a selection criteria, 28 interventions were included for analysis from a list of 72, identified through desk research and secondary analysis. Using a key informant interview (KII) guide, 16 KIIs were conducted with people involved in such interventions. Very few interventions were successfully implemented and were operating for more than 3 years. Sustained and scaled up interventions were either supported by the government or had to rely on an alternate revenue model. High dependency on donor funding, lack of business case, weak revenue model, lack of awareness, governance model and M&E Framework, adapting technological changes, low retention rate of the backend service providers remains as key issues for scaleup and sustainability. Buy-in by government stakeholders doesn't guarantee sustainability without proper governance mechanism and key resources in place to manage such intervention. Multi-stakeholder engagement including actors from both public and private sector with key strength (e.g., finance, knowledge management, technology management, M&E, operation and maintenance) is required to sustain digital health intervention.
Youth Agents of Change for Collection, Analysis of Community Feedback on COVID-19 Prevention and Vaccine Uptake in Malawi
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Patnice Jana, UNICEF
Co-authors :
Kenford Mayere
Blessings Mtuwa Nkhata, UNICEF
As the Coronavirus continues to spread around the country disrupting lives, it forced UNICEF Malawi to reimagine and change the way of doing business. The challenge and magnitude of the pandemic compounded by the already challenging economic and social situation led UNICEF Malawi to extend its reach and engage with volunteer youth structures across 10 districts through a partnership with a local youth led NGO called Youth Wave.In an effort to ensure big success and transform the way young people are consulted on important issues like ending child marriages, keeping children in school, governance issues, climate change programme goals and COVID-19, they were engaged through the use of communication and digital media as social influencers, educators and channels of feedback to inform programming and enhance change.The volunteering youth structures were trained in digital media on collecting feedback from the communities on their behaviour perceptions around COVID-19 and on how to combat misinformation on COVID-19 and vaccines and how they can use digital media to reassure the public by raising awareness on the safety and efficacy of vaccines. These young people collected feedback from over 3962 community members. The feedback provided great insights that helped in promoting greater engagement between the communities and those responsible for response development and implementation across all the sectors, gave opportunity to communities to voice out what they want and need to fight the pandemic, strengthened collaboration among various stakeholders, and continue to enhance understanding on what is working or not working.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 4
Better Cross-Sectoral Collaboration, Better Health Outcomes: Applications of the Circle of Care Model
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Human-Centered Design (HCD)
Speakers
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Anne Pfitzer, Jhpiego
Mokshada Jain, Surgo Ventures
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Moderators
Heather Hancock, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
When Social and Behavior Change (SBC) and Service Delivery (SD) projects work together, health outcomes improve. Until recently, partners lacked a systematic framework and a joint understanding of precisely how SBC can strengthen service delivery. The Circle of Care Model was developed to create a common reference for the integration of SBC and SD activities. This conceptual framework demonstrates how SBC can be used across the service delivery continuum – before, during, and after services – to improve health outcomes and reduce health inequities.The Circle of Care model is human-centered, placing the needs, perspectives and wants of clients and providers at the forefront of program planning. The model shows how SBC can be used at each stage of the service delivery continuum. In the Before Stage, SBC motivates clients to access services by generating demand, creating an enabling environment, and setting supportive norms. In the During Stage, SBC improves the client-provider interaction by empowering clients, improving provider behavior, and building trust. In the After Stage, SBC boosts adherence and maintenance by enhancing follow-up, supporting behavioral maintenance, and reinforcing linkages between facilities and with communities. The end result is more effective service delivery programs that meet the needs of the audiences and contribute to improved health outcomes.This panel highlights practical applications of the Circle of Care model and facilitates discussion around how to use the model in participants' contexts. It prompts discussion around the need for SBC and SD partnerships and collective action for improved health outcomes.
Promoting Respectful Maternity Care During Labor and Delivery in Zambia and Liberia
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Jana Smith, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Allison Schachter
Ameck Kamanga, PATH
Mistreatment during labor and delivery is a well-established global problem, yet research on effective interventions to change provider behavior is still quite limited. This presentation will highlight solutions for provider behavior change – part of the During Stage of the Circle of Care. A four-prong set of solutions was tested in Zambia and adapted and piloted in Liberia: 1) a pain management toolkit-a range of cues and tools placed through the ward to continuously prompt supportive care 2) a provider-client promise-a list of promises read out loud to clients upon admission and signed to set boundaries around acceptable provider care and shift power imbalances, 3) a feedback box-a means to default women into evaluating their experience of care and elevate their voice, 4) a reflection workshop-a safe space for providers to discuss facility norms and build motivation and a commitment to improve client care. The results of the evaluation showed statistically significant differences between clients in the treatment and control sites related to their experiences of disrespect and abuse and pain management support received.  The package of solutions, informed by behavioral science, holds promise to positively impact the experience of care of women in labor. The solution set was feasible to implement in both Zambia and Liberia and well received by health workers, thus suggesting its promise for scale. Additional research is needed to more rigorously test impact, refine intervention design to more effectively elevate client expectations of care, and ensure acceptability and feasibility at scale.
Motivating a High-risk Segment of Employed Men to Seek Care for Tuberculosis Testing through an Omni-channel Digital Intervention in Urban Southern India
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Mokshada Jain, Surgo Ventures
Co-authors :
Hannah Kemp, Surgo Foundation
Akash Dey, CHI
Sanskriti Goel, CHI
Devika Kapadia
K Ravi Shankar, CHI
Gokul Sundar, CHAI
Tichakunda Mangono, Surgo Foundation
Gayathri Natrajan
Sema Sgaier, Surgo Foundation
Driving early identification for infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) in the Before stage of the Circle of Care is critical to effective care and reduction of community spread. For a high-risk population of urban, employed mid-age men in Southern India, low care seeking for TB is driven by symptom normalization, norms around masculinity and status, and concerns around slow, expensive or difficult-to-access services. Given that this segment has high digital access, a multilayer digital intervention was designed to counter these beliefs and enable faster care seeking. The intervention comprised a campaign via high-reach platforms such as Facebook, Whatsapp, and YouTube, interest-building interactive tools such as a chatbot, helpline, and engagement tools like a nearby facility locator, and self-assessment test for TB risk. The intervention was iteratively optimized over an 8 month period and reached 30 million non-unique individuals at a sustainable cost, with 400k engaged users. Symptom recognition targeted messaging was most effective, and different content formats performed better on different platforms. Interactive platforms saw high initial bounce rates and required design optimization to improve retention. The study yields important insights around the design of digital interventions in urban low income contexts in India, including platform and content choices. This model presents a novel approach to develop and target behavioral messaging approaches to demand generation for TB care seeking among the most vulnerable populations, and initializes a pathway to service delivery around testing and treatment in the TB Circle of Care.
The After stage in the Circle of Care for postpartum women: Lessons from Liberia, Tanzania, and Ethiopia
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Anne Pfitzer, Jhpiego
Co-authors :
Chelsea Cooper
The After stage of the Circle of Care applies SBC theory and practices to support clients in following through on counseling during the health contact (using contact to imply both facility and community-based health services). For postpartum family planning (PPFP) especially, there can be a lag between counseling and initiation of a method, as counseling happening during pregnancy, at childbirth or a postnatal contact may necessarily or by choice involve delayed start of contraception. Women who have not discussed PPFP with their partners frequently wish to before adopting contraception, especially where postpartum abstinence norms exist. Thus, PPFP is most effective when we embrace opportunities afforded by a continuum from antenatal to immunization visits in the extended postpartum period. In designing effective service integration, the Circle of Care guides us to anticipate women's needs at multiple visits, ideally linking FP discussions from one visit to another. Under USAID's Maternal and Child Survival Program, Jhpiego undertook several implementation research studies on PPFP in Liberia, Tanzania and Ethiopia, with varying models of PPFP integration. This presentation will tease out specific components of SBC design to support clients after a visit, facilitate self-care and encourage linkages from one visit to the next.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Anfa (Mogador)
Regional Programming
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Fedala (Mogador)
A Pixelated Blue Sky: Where Frontier Technology Pushing the Boundaries of Social and Behavior Change (SBC)
Format : Blue Skies Presentation
Track : Digital/Mobile | Inclusion
Speakers
Manya Dotson, Jhpiego
Revolutionary technologies are transforming this world, the people in it, and the decisions they make every day. Emerging technology is continuously opening doors to ideas, worlds, and experiences that were never possible before. This "Blue Sky Session" will bring together a unique set of people to discuss the possibilities for the future of SBC in a world of frontier technologies. What does social and behavior change look like when interventions are augmented with artificial intelligence? What does behavior look like after interventions simulated in a 4D immersive environment? How do social structures change when knowledge becomes democratized through decentralized technology? With vast advancements in biotechnology, will we be able to make behavioral changes at the cellular level? What if you could select to remove a gene linked to addiction or obesity; what if you could add a gene linked with emotional intelligence? This session will demonstrate new frontiers in technology as it relates to SBCC, asking the hard questions around ethics, and stimulating a discussion around where technology is leading SBCC to new possibilities. We know that digital divides exist between genders, remote and urban locations, and different countries worldwide. During this session, the panelists will discuss the issue of a widening divide as technology becomes more evolved and sophisticated.
06:30PM - 08:30PM
Reda 5
Intersections of Faith and Norms
Format : Auxiliary Event
The purpose of examining in depth how faith-based entities and narratives can contribute to social and behavioural change in the MENA region, with a particular emphasis on social and gender norms. The side event will also be an opportunity to share good practices where faith-based organizations have responded to gender norms and harmful practices in the region.
06:30PM - 08:30PM
Reda 4
Effective Strategies to Counter Rumors and Misinformation, Information Voids
Format : Auxiliary Event
The COVID-19 pandemic brought fresh attention to the ways that misinformation and disinformation influence vaccine demand. The role of social media algorithms in turbo-charging the spread of rumors and falsehoods is in the spotlight as never before. There have also been new opportunities to understand the real-world concerns of communities and to engage with them using digital tools. Just as trusted messengers play a key role in shaping offline community dialogue on vaccine safety and efficacy, online influencers are also well-placed to develop and deliver impactful information to vulnerable groups. This session will discuss examples from polio, routine immunization and COVID-19 of how this dynamic field can be used to counter misinformation and build demand.
06:30PM - 08:30PM
Auxiliary Session Details Coming Soon!
Format : Auxiliary Session
Wednesday, Day 3, Dec 07, 2022
07:00AM - 09:00AM
Auxiliary Session Details Coming Soon!
Format : Auxiliary Event
07:30AM - 09:00AM
Karam 2
Dialogue with the Private Sector
Format : Auxiliary Event
The purpose of this side event is to bring together a diverse audience of external (to UNICEF) stakeholders representing a spectrum of the private sector and members of the SBC community, to discuss and generate ideas for innovative programming, service delivery and community engagement by understanding and hearing more about approaches that have worked for the private sector.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Aud des Ambassadeurs
Multimedia Interventions for Child Protection
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Children | Gender | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Zeina Merhi, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Diala Ktaiche, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Jeldau Rieff, Stepping Stones International
Lisa Jamu, Stepping Stones International
Moderators
Hadeer Albo Heae, UNICEF
“Be the Voice for Our Children” (Infomercial On Reporting Child Sexual Abuse)
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Lisa Jamu, Stepping Stones International
Jeldau Rieff, Stepping Stones International
Evidence shows that sexual exploitation and abuse has serious short and long-term physical, psychological and social consequences on children. These include increased risks for illness, unwanted pregnancy, psychological distress, discrimination and difficulties at school, hence the need to adopt zero tolerance towards this crime. The extent of child sexual abuse is unclear as reporting is low in Botswana, thus children's rights contravened (Botswana Police Commissioner 2021). Often a child is not taken seriously, a perpetrator is protected or families settle a case within their homes. Child sexual abuse has significantly increased during the COVID pandemic. Botswana ranks the highest rape incidence per capita in the world which requires catalytic action by citizens to "Be the Voice for Our Children."The five-minute infomercial, which Stepping Stones International and beneficiaries produced, presents information and solutions to the underreporting of child sexual abuse by answering the basic question of 'why is it important to report and what are long-term effects for a child if crime is not reported. By understanding these effects, more people will react and report the way Thato* did after viewing the infomercial stating, "I did not know what my Uncle was doing was wrong, but I knew it hurt me." The infomercial is the springboard for action which strives towards the realization of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5 on Gender Equality, to eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation. 
The Qudwa Positive and Responsive Caregiving Toolbox – a cross sectorial multimedia Toolbox to support positive and responsive caregiving
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Diala Ktaiche, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Zeina Merhi, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
In collaboration with Magenta and under the framework of the QUDWA - SBCC plan to prevent violence against children and women, child labour and child marriage, UNICEF Lebanon designed  a toolbox aimed at engaging caregivers as active agents in leading on change for children. The toolbox supports caregivers to gain the skills they need to adopt & to promote chidlren's protection and positive caregiving approaches. The toolbox focuses on normalizing responsive cargiving for both man and women- and is thus a gender sensitive tool that contributes to gender equality. It tackles various subjects such as violent discipline, child labour, child marriage, girls education, hygiene, early stimulation, communication with adolescents, as well as mother and child health during pregnancy. This toolbox is designed  in ways that would allow volunteers, community mobilizers and any stakeholder to use it in any community space when caregiving is discussed or promoted with the aim of increasing knowledge and self-efficacy among parents and teenagers, as well as value deliberation, which are key to the adoption of protective behaviours. While each tool serves different aims and addresses different target behaviours, they are complimentary and seek to enhance caregivers' knowledge and skills in order to promote positive caregiving. The tools are intended to be used independently of or in conjunction with a variety of caregiving and parenting curricula being utilized in Lebanon, but could also be used elsewhere in the MENA region. These tools can be used in different setting including Primary healthcare centers, classrooms and others. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Aud des Ministres
Entertainment Education Approaches for Nutrition and Prevention of Violence against Women and Children
Format : Multimedia Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Digital/Mobile | Entertainment Education | Gender
Speakers
Zeina Mehri, UNICEF
Amal Haouet, MAGENTA
ANURUDRA BHANOT, Project Concern International, India
Hua Wang, University At Buffalo, The State University Of New York
Moderators
Maurice Ocquaye, CORE Group
BREAKAWAY: An Entertainment-Education Game about Violence against Women and Girls
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Hua Wang, University At Buffalo, The State University Of New York
Co-authors :
Ann DeMarle
Wendi Stein, Population Media Center
BREAKAWAY is one the first entertainment-education games. It was designed to raise awareness and educate youth around the world about violence against women and girls. This game uses football as an international language to engage youth (8-18) and role modeling through its main characters to present realistic scenarios where girls are mistreated because they are girls. As a first-person role-playing game, the player makes choices at various turning points and can become a "transitional character" in the story, learning about the consequences of their decisions, which may or may not help the team to win the championship if they do not break away from toxic gender norms. For over a decade, BREAKAWAY has grown from a game to an international initiative with a youth camp model, coupling gameplay with facilitated group discussions and activities for deeper learning and more sustainable change. Building on lessons learned from El Salvador and Guatemala, this presentation will showcase the game design, camp implementation, and major lessons learned about the role of digital games for SBCC interventions. 
Leveraging Digital Activities & Platforms to Strengthen SBCC Interventions in Rural Areas
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
ANURUDRA BHANOT, Project Concern International, India
Bihar is among the poorest states in India with high rates of undernutrition and high prevalence of health problems among women and children (NFHS-5, IIPS). Project Concern International India's JTSP project works with poor households in rural Bihar to influence social norms and behavior change. The project uses an entertainment drama series with health, nutrition and gender-based messaging woven into the storyline, along with mobile app based videobots, games and quizzes/contests to engage pregnant and lactating women, mothers of children under two years of age and their family members belonging to the self-help groups (SHGs) operated by the Bihar Rural Livelihoods Promotion Society (also known as JEEViKA). JEEViKA's community cadres use pico-projectors for community screenings among large groups, and their smartphones for smaller meetings when visiting individual member households. JEEViKA's cadres invite the audience after each screening to take the quiz through the bot, and play the games created using the key characters from the drama series. JEEViKA cadres also share the drama episodes, bots and the games through social media platforms with community members who have access to a personal or family smartphones, to enjoy the episodes and play the games with other family members and friends. The project's strategy of leveraging edutainment and digital interventions is not only helping the project to reach larger number of rural poor, but also engaging them in fun and exciting ways.
Qudwa – Using Edutainment to Challenge Violence Against Women and Children in Lebanon
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Amal Haouet, MAGENTA
Zeina Mehri, UNICEF
In 2019, to counter violence against women & children, child marriage and child labour in Lebanon, MAGENTA developed the country's first National Social and Behavioural Change Communications (SBCC) Strategy, targeting three cohorts of the population in Lebanon (Lebanese, Syrian and Palestinian). The strategy was branded Qudwa, meaning role-model in English.  One of the activities under the strategy was the development of a piece of high-quality edutainment designed to shift perceptions, spark a dialogue on violence, and contribute to a favorable media environment for the successful implementation of other Qudwa activities.   In 2021, MAGENTA produced a 20-episode 'soap opera' – Bakir – which discussed issues like child labour, child marriage, and domestic violence. MAGENTA worked with an acclaimed Lebanese script-writer, director, crew and cast, and shot the series in Bekaa and Beirut.  MAGENTA tested the soap opera's pilot with a cross-section of our target audience. We found that, not only did the audience find the series entertaining, watching the pilot also stimulated debate about the core topics we aimed to address, particularly child marriage, intimate partner violence and violence against children.  The show premiered in February 2022 and is already on its second broadcast run. So far it has been seen by over 1 million viewers and discussed online by over 3 million people. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 1
Communication for Climate Action
Format : Panel Presentation
Moderators
Anna Godfrey, BBC Media Action
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Fes 1a
Tug of War Between Power, Equity, and Ethics: What is the Role of SBC?
Format : Blue Skies Presentation
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Inclusion | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Sara Jewett Nieuwoudt, University Of The Witwatersrand
Foyeke Oyedokun-Adebagbo , United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Moderators
Carol Underwood, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
This session will invite practitioners, researchers, government representatives, donor representatives, and civil society members to debate how power and influence shape whether equity and social determinants of health (SDOH) are explicitly considered in the funding, design, implementation, and evaluation of social and behavior change (SBC) programming. The panel will examine how power dynamics and resource distribution and allocation shapes who participates in the design and decision-making process and benefits from SBC programming by using an intersectional lens that unpacks patterns of oppression and privilege that give rise to disparities in access to and use of family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH) information, services, and products and subsequent health outcomes. Panelists will explore how best to shape FP/RH investments and design SBC programming to intentionally and systematically address equity and SDOH and effect social and structural change while building support and deepening multi-sectoral partnerships and coalitions. For too long, most programming has benefited those in higher wealth quintiles who experience fewer intersectional disadvantages, leaving many without access to quality information, services, and products and the ability to realize their full potential of health and well-being. The field of SBC has a unique role to play in this space as well as a responsibility to be more intentional about equity in programs globally.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Fes 2a
(Main) Streaming Entertainment Education : Meeting the Future in Digital Formats
Format : Panel Presentation
More session information coming soon!
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 3
Communication as a Behavior Change Intervention To Engage Local Communities In The Context Of COVID-19
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Veronica Avalos Clerici, Global Immunization Action Network Team (GIANT)
Kiyini Jimedine, Global Immunization Action Network Team (GIANT)/Zidan Benevolence
William Remak, Global Immunization Action Network Team (GIANT)
Maia Romanowska, Stowarzyszenie Higieny Lecznictwa (SHL)
L. Arlette Saavedra Romero, Secretaria De Salud
Julia Pantoglou, Africa AHEAD
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 4
The Role of SBCC in Peacebuilding and Conflict Prevention (Including Reducing Violence Against Women): Reviewing Evidence and Practice to Strengthen the Approach
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Gender | Research | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Gillian Kiplagat, BBC Media Action
Abdisalan Abdi, Equal Access International
Alasdair Stuart, BBC Media Action
Aimee Barnes, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Gad Peter Shamaki Shamaki, Equal Access International
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
In recognition of the success of SBCC in other disciplines there has been an increasing focus on how media and communication can be used to tackle social and behaviour change in relation to peacebuilding and conflict prevention (e.g. by influencing norms around dissent, dispute resolution and the use of violence, including gender-based violence). There is emerging (but limited) evidence of the success of SBCC approaches in this field. However, some media interventions have had unintended (negative) consequences and it calls for more research on the mechanisms underpinning impact of media interventions. Recent assessments and research examining EAI's SBCC in CVE work in Nigeria and Burkina Faso have assessed what media programming interventions are most effective at sustaining interest and creating new beliefs and behaviors to transform violent extremism.Equal Access will present learning about what we know what works in positively affecting attitudes, behaviors and social norms in VE-affected environments, supporting practitioners, policymakers, donors, governments and other decision makers to consider how to use SBCC to accelerate transformational change and build resilience to the potential upheaval of violence, support gender-inclusive peacebuilding and reduce violence against women.  
The role of SBCC in peacebuilding and conflict prevention (including reducing violence against women): reviewing evidence and practice to strengthen the approach
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Abdisalan Abdi, Equal Access International
Co-authors :
Gemma Ferguson, Equal Access International
In recognition of the success of SBCC in other disciplines there has been an increasing focus on how media and communication can be used to tackle social and behaviour change in relation to peacebuilding and conflict prevention (e.g. by influencing norms around dissent, dispute resolution and the use of violence, including gender-based violence). There is emerging (but limited) evidence of the success of SBCC approaches in this field. However, some media interventions have had unintended (negative) consequences and it calls for more research on the mechanisms underpinning impact of media interventions. Recent assessments and research examining EAI's SBCC in CVE work in Nigeria and Burkina Faso have assessed what media programming interventions are most effective at sustaining interest and creating new beliefs and behaviors to transform violent extremism.Equal Access will present learning about what we know what works in positively affecting attitudes, behaviors and social norms in VE-affected environments, supporting practitioners, policymakers, donors, governments and other decision makers to consider how to use SBCC to accelerate transformational change and build resilience to the potential upheaval of violence, support gender-inclusive peacebuilding and reduce violence against women.
The role of SBCC in peacebuilding and conflict prevention (including reducing violence against women): reviewing evidence and practice to strengthen the approach
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Aimee Barnes, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
In recognition of the success of SBCC in other disciplines there has been an increasing focus on how media and communication can be used to tackle social and behaviour change in relation to peacebuilding and conflict prevention (e.g. by influencing norms around dissent, dispute resolution and the use of violence, including gender-based violence). There is emerging (but limited) evidence of the success of SBCC approaches in this field. However, some media interventions have had unintended (negative) consequences and it calls for more research on the mechanisms underpinning impact of media interventions. In this this panel, J-PAL will provide an overview of the current evidence base for SBCC approaches to peacebuilding and violence prevention-drawing especially on new and emerging evidence from mass media and edutainment interventions implemented across diverse and complex contexts and situating this against evidence for other peacebuilding and conflict prevention interventions.This will support practitioners, policymakers, donors, governments and other decision makers to consider how to use SBCC to accelerate transformational change and build resilience to the potential upheaval of violence, support gender-inclusive peacebuilding and reduce violence against women.  
The role of SBCC in peacebuilding and conflict prevention (including reducing violence against women): reviewing evidence and practice to strengthen the approach
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Gillian Kiplagat, BBC Media Action
Co-authors :
Alasdair Stuart, BBC Media Action
In recognition of the success of SBCC in other disciplines there has been an increasing focus on how media and communication can be used to tackle social and behaviour change in relation to peacebuilding and conflict prevention (e.g. by influencing norms around dissent, dispute resolution and the use of violence, including gender-based violence). As a sector-leader in the C4D field, BBC Media Action will describe how its work in conflict affected states (including Myanmar and South Sudan) uses SBCC to impact audience-level outcomes relevant to peace and conflict prevention (e.g. norms around the use of violence, including gender-based violence, and the acceptance of others). It will also discuss how it uses audience research to inform project design and adaptation, provide an overview of its approach to evaluation of this work, summarise key evaluation approaches (and impact) in this field and reflect on some of the challenges/limitations of research to date. This will support practitioners, policymakers, donors, governments and other decision makers to consider how to use SBCC to accelerate transformational change and build resilience to the potential upheaval of violence, support gender-inclusive peacebuilding and reduce violence against women.
The role of SBCC in peacebuilding and conflict prevention (including reducing violence against women): reviewing evidence and practice to strengthen the approach
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Alasdair Stuart, BBC Media Action
Co-authors :
Aimee Barnes, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)
Gillian Kiplagat, BBC Media Action
Abdisalan Abdi, Equal Access International
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 5
Not without Norms Change: Cross-National Findings on the Role and Importance of Norms Controlling Girls’ Sexuality in Supporting the Practice of Child Early and Forced Marriage.
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Children | Gender | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Erin Murphy-Graham
Enrique Valencia Lopez
Alison Cohen
DIana Pacheco-Montoya
Priya Das
Anne Laterra, CARE
Nitin Datta, ICRW
Ruchira Naved, Icddr,b
This panel brings together researchers, practitioners, and funders to a) reflect on the gender norms that regulate or control girls' sexuality and their role in reinforcing the practice of child early and forced marriage (CEFM) and b) determine how we can attend to these norms as part of both systematic- and SBCC-based efforts to address CEFM. This session will allow conference-goers to engage with research conducted in three different high-CEFM communities in India, Bangladesh, and Honduras. We suggest that restrictive gender norms around girls' sexuality span all three contexts and jeopardize interventions to address child marriage. In India, we explore how increases in support for educational attainment among girls, often cited as a critical approach to preventing CEFM, can be instrumentalized to make girls more eligible for early and forced marriages. Similarly, in Bangladesh, we present how the restrictive norms that continue to surround girls, even as their educational attainment increases, can put them at heightened risk for CEFM as they push against boundaries erected to control their sexuality. Finally, in Honduras, we present the concept of 'marianista' gender norms and illustrate how the inflexibility of these norms, which expect girls' passivity, supervision, and regulation, serve to push many adolescents toward early marriages. We conclude that SBCC approaches must reflect an understanding of the specific norms surrounding the behaviors targeted and be designed to address them through multi level approaches. SBCC strategies that attempt to address CEFM without an understanding of these norms will be less impactful. 
Gender Norms, Control Over Girls’ Sexuality, and Child Marriage: A Honduran Case Study
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Enrique Valencia Lopez
Alison Cohen
Co-authors :
DIana Pacheco-Montoya
Erin Murphy-Graham
Social norms and cultural beliefs regarding girls' appropriate roles and their sexuality can play an important role in fostering CM. When girls reach puberty, their emerging sexuality can lead their families and communities to fear that girls will become sexually active, become pregnant out of wedlock, and/or express the sort of sexual autonomy that is perceived to damage a family's honor. This family and community fear can affect girls' decision-making processes, sense of autonomy, mobility, and social, academic, and economic opportunities. We draw upon marianismo and adolescent development theory to explore why rigid gender norms and the control of adolescent girls' sexuality can drive CM in the Honduran context. We find that girls who scored higher on a scale of traditional gender norms were more likely to marry early. Additionally, the control girls experience clashes with undergoing psychosocial changes that are associated with increased desire for autonomy and intimacy as well as increased awareness of their sexuality. In some cases, girls believed that marriage was better than staying in their restrictive households, and/or they viewed marriage as the only way to have a romantic relationship.
Exploring the Prevalence of Child Marriage and the Social Norms that Facilitate the Practice in Bangladesh
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Ruchira Naved, Icddr,b
 The practice of child early and forced marriage (CEFM) has, in many contexts, been demonstrated to be a deeply entrenched and inherently challenging issue. This abstract presents the results of a baseline study, implemented in Rangpur, Bangladesh, as part of a larger cluster-randomized controlled trial of an intervention targeting CEFM and associated attitudes, beliefs, and norms. The prevalence of CEFM in the study communities was assessed using data from household enumeration. Qualitative data collected from adolescent boys and girls, their parents, and community-level key informants, were used to explore the social norms that support this practice. We found that CEFM is quite common, with 59% of girls married before turning 18, and practiced primarily as a way to exercise control over girls' sexuality and / or mitigate the perceived loss of that control by family and community members. We also observed that strategies often thought of as solutions to CEFM, such as increasing girls' access to and enrolment in secondary and tertiary education without appropriate social norm change, could be triggers for CEFM. If girls were seen as pushing up too closely against expectations related to their mobility and engagement with male peers, something that was becoming more common in response to increased schooling, an often-cited mitigation strategy was to have them marry. Overall, these findings point to the importance of integrating social norms work into SBCC strategies on CEFM to improve their effectiveness without causing any inadvertent harm or unwanted consequences.
Education, Sexuality, and Marriageability: Overlapping Tropes in the Lives of Adolescent Girls in Haryana, India
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Priya Das
Nitin Datta, ICRW
Increasing girls' access to and participation in education is an important mechanism through which delays in early marriage can be achieved. Through research conducted in service of an impact evaluation of a Conditional Cash Transfer scheme, Apni Beti Apna Dhan, which aimed to prevent early marriage of girls, we explore the aspirations of girls and their mothers surrounding education and marriage. Through 124 in-depth interviews among both beneficiaries and eligible but non-beneficiaries, we found that the value of and appreciation for education is largely related to the benefits that education brings in terms of a girls' marriage prospects. Indeed, families were often delicately balancing the benefits education brought in terms of marriage with the risks it posed in terms of mobility, sexuality, and conduct. Overall, the study illustrates the limitations of these types of conditional cash transfer programs if they are not accompanied by broader SBCC approaches that tackle gender and social norms that continue to prioritize control of girls' sexuality including through early marriage. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 1
Helping Youth Navigate their SRH Needs
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Daniel Kasansula, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
Cecelia Angelone, Pathfinder International
Zonja Penzhorn , Shout-It-Now
Olukunle Omotoso, The Challenge Initiative
Moderators
Taroub Faramand, WI-HER, LLC
Improved Enabling Environment for Family Planning Programming Through Effective Engagement of Interfaith Group, Southwestern State, Nigeria
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Olukunle Omotoso, The Challenge Initiative
Co-authors :
Olubunmi Ojelade, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
BackgroundReligion inclination play major roles in the socio-cultural norms, belief system, decision making, value system and health behaviours of the Nigerian populace. Hence the religious leaders (RLs) play significant roles as major influencers of contraceptive health behaviour for men and women of reproductive age who are greatly influenced by teachings of these leaders.InterventionA total of 40 RLs were recruited. The capacity of the RLs was built in advocacy, family planning messaging and delivery, and referral linkages. The RLs were equipped with resource materials developed from the Bible for the Christian faith and Quran for the Islamic faith. The religious leaders were also linked to resource materials on The Challenge Initiative University (TCI-U) which further strengthen their capacity in family planning programming. ResultsWithin a period of 12 months, social norms and open dialogue on family planning and contraceptive uptake for sexually active young persons improved. A total of 62 media slots were aired which addressed socio-religious myths and misconceptions on contraception; 336, 876 members of the congregation were reached with messages on benefit, safety and religious support for use of contraception, a total of 184 voices of RLs were captured speaking in favor of FP during public events.Implications for field practiceInvolvement of religious leaders in the design, implementation and evaluation of social behaviour change (SBC) interventions is essential. This would address social cultural and religious barriers to behaviour change, strengthen positive behaviour, and improve credibility of sources of SBC information in many developing countries.
Does Normalizing Sexual Conversations Increase HIV Prevention Demand in Young Women Aged 20-24 years? Lessons from the Mo’ghel, Get Your Life Pack! Campaign in 5 South African Districts.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Zonja Penzhorn , Shout-It-Now
During South Africa's COVID-19 waves, community-based providers of HIV prevention services were challenged to engage clients. To cut through other public health messaging and motivate clients to access services, Shout-It-Now (Shout) developed a demand creation campaign that tapped into young women's desire to move forward in their lives and relationships after feeling stalled by COVID-19 lockdowns. Using human-centered design principles, Shout engaged clients, staff and a media partner to provide input on vocabulary, tone, messages and service journey mapping. Informed by this input, Shout's Mo'ghel, Get Your Life Pack! campaign spoke to young women in their own language and featured an aspirational value proposition: come get a free pack of youth-friendly services that can improve your life and relationships. The campaign was implemented August 12-October 8, 2021 in five districts. During the six-week campaign period, 3,499 clients were served and 2,854 (82%) reported they heard of the campaign. Of those aware of the campaign, 2,697 (94%) were females and 1,368 (51%) were aged 20-24, the campaign's target demographic. There was a 668% increase in HIV testing and a 44% increase in PrEP initiations among females aged 20-24 years during the campaign period compared to the preceding six weeks. These results strongly suggest that promoting empowerment and normalizing sexual health conversations can lead to HIV prevention seeking behaviors among a highly vulnerable population. This approach is now used to design all Shout communications and is easily replicable.
Reimagining Contraceptive Services for Adolescents: Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention Designed to Increase Girls’ Sexual and Reproductive Health Attitudes and Intentions in Burkina Faso
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Cecelia Angelone, Pathfinder International
Co-authors :
Laura Hinson, International Center For Research On Women
Triantafyllos Pliakas, London School Of Hygiene And Tropical Medicine
Emily Schaub, International Center For Research On Women
Mahaman Nourou AYA, REM Africa
Mohamad Brooks, Pathfinder International
Abdou Abga, Pathfinder International
Reshma Trasi, Pathfinder International
Engaging end-users is critical to designing and testing interventions that address the specific barriers women and girls face in voluntarily accessing and using contraceptives. One size does not fit all, even within subpopulations such as adolescent girls and young women. The (re)solve project in Burkina Faso used behavioral science and engaged girls to design and test scalable solutions for schoolgirls in grades 9 and 10, with the objective of improving their sexual and reproductive health (SRH) intention and attitudes. The objective of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of the (re)solve intervention in Burkina Faso.We conducted an impact evaluation using a mixed-methods cluster randomized control trial. The intervention had a positive effect on girls' intention to use contraception, though this did not reach statistical significance. Girls receiving the intervention had statistically significant attitudes related to contraception at endline compared to girls at control schools. We also found a significant increase in the percentage of intervention-school girls reporting they went to a health facility for SRH information or services. Qualitative findings demonstrate that the intervention was well received and that misconceptions related to contraceptive use persisted in this mostly young, sexually naïve population.The (re)solve intervention showed promise for supporting adolescent schoolgirls to use contraception and potentially avoid pregnancies in Burkina Faso. Multi-component interventions with activities that address deep-seated norms and beliefs are still needed; however, there is also a need for focused, innovative, interventions that are easily scalable in low-resource settings.
Using Adolescent Centric SBCC Interventions to Promote FP and ANC Services Utilisation Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women: Lesson from East Central Uganda.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Daniel Kasansula, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
Co-authors :
Keith Baleeta, University Research Co., LLC
Esther Kalanzi, USAID Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services In East Central Uganda (RHITES-EC) Project, URC
Robert Iriso, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) Project, URC
Augustin Muhwezi, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC), URC
Adrian Kalemeera, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services In East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES-EC) Project University Research Co., LLC
Emmanuel Atuhairwe, USAID’s Regional Health Integration To Enhance Services – East Central Uganda (USAID RHITES–EC) , URC
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 2
Before They're Born: Best Outcomes for Mothers and Babies
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Maternal Health | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
Speakers
Yvonne SERUBIBI UMURUNGI, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Akinyi Odera, ThinkPlace Kenya
Ines Gortari, ThinkPlace Kenya
Sarah Mpapuluu, ThinkPlace
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Zoé Hendrickson, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Moderators
Wame Jallow, Population Media Center (PMC)
Collective Action for the Prevention of Preterm Births: A Mixed Methods Study from Bangladesh and Ethiopia
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Zoé Hendrickson, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Co-authors :
Nandita Kapadia Kundu, Vegetarian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Timothy Werwie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Carmen Cronin, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Amanuel Gidebo, World Vision
Marie Bettings, World Vision
Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause globally of neonatal and under-five mortality. Little is known about contextual factors of PTB in low and middle income countries (LMICs) as most research has been conducted in high income countries. Systematic efforts to research preventive approaches to PTB are lacking.Preterm births are live births delivered prior to 37 weeks of gestation. More than half of preterm births are low birth weight (< 2500g), leaving newborns at risk of both subsequent morbidity and mortality. Globally, the burden of preterm births is primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, with 90% of preterm births occurring in low and middle income countries. The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) is the global lead researcher to assess the distal (household and societal) factors of PTB.Survey data were collected in March 2020 in Ethiopia (N= 927) and September to November 2020 in Bangladesh (N = 855) and Mali (n=904) with women (15-49 years) with a child < 2 years.The results for the PTB Bangladesh and Ethiopia model indicated several significant (p< .05) protective and risk factors for preventing PTB. The protective factors include education, more dietary consumption than pre-pregnancy, and a belief in "mitat" which prevents women from working long hours in the midday sun. The risk factors include a positive attitude towards early marriage, living in a high violence cluster where partner violence is in more than 7 out of 10 households and excessive workload in pregnancy.
A Social Norms-Based Approach to Reduce Anemia Among Women of Reproductive Age in India: Biomedical and Behavioral Outcomes from the RANI Project
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Co-authors :
Bee-Ah Kang, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Michael Long, The George Washington University
Hagere Yilma, Boston University
Jeffrey Bingenheimer, The George Washington University
Erica Sedlander, University Of California, San Francisco
Lipika Patro, IPE Global Limited
Ichhya Pant
Satyanarayan Mohanty, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
Rohini Ganjoo, The George Washington University
Despite significant expenditures by the Government of India (GOI) to reduce anemia, including through the national Anemia Mukht Bharat (Anemia-Free India) program, anemia prevalence has remained high. Latest data show a deterioration in anemia among women in the last four years, from 54% to 57% prevalence. The WHO and the GOI recommend regular and sustained iron folic acid (IFA) consumption to reduce anemia. This requires an adequate supply and delivery of IFA, the focus of the GOI. Missing in this effort is a scientifically sound and culturally tailored approach to ensure IFA consumption by the target population. This demand-side task, unfortunately, lacks funding and prioritization in government policies. In this presentation, we report findings from the Reduction in Anemia through Normative Innovations (RANI) Project, a cluster randomized trial to improve social norms, thereby promoting and sustaining IFA consumption behaviors and subsequently reducing anemia. Longitudinal data over three years to assess serum hemoglobin were collected through Hemocue finger pricks at baseline (N=4,110), midline (N=3,953), and end-line (N=3,780) from women in treatment and control arms. Findings showed a significant treatment effect in reducing anemia (P< .001); the existing difference of .16 g/dL between treatment and control arms at baseline increased significantly to .50 g/dL at end-line. Another analysis showed the RANI Project reduced anemia prevalence by 12.5%, demonstrating the effectiveness of a social norms-based approach at a population level. Scaling up the intervention approach by integrating it with the existing healthcare system widescale implementation remains a viable goal. 
Generating Behavioral Insights Using Rapid Research Approaches
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Akinyi Odera, ThinkPlace Kenya
Ines Gortari, ThinkPlace Kenya
Sarah Mpapuluu, ThinkPlace
In 2019 – 2021, ThinkPlace Kenya partnered with Jhpiego to conduct behavioral research to understand the barriers to early entry into care and the continued usage of maternal healthcare services among pregnant women in rural and peri-urban regions of Kenya, Malawi, Ethiopia, and Mali. The team used a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing on the fields of sociology, anthropology, and human-centered design to unpack participants' attitudes, norms, and customs preventing the uptake of healthcare services. The team prepared participatory research tools to help get a more in-depth understanding of the social and psychological drivers of behavior, aside from the physical influences. The tools complemented focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. These tools were: Silent debate, Good advice corner, Empathy Cards, Decision-making prompts, and research conducted through a national radio station. The design of the tools considered multiple stimuli presentation methods such as the use of visuals, videos, and active engagement of participants through debate-like prompts.  The team administered the tools in a semi-structured fashion when engaging pregnant women, men, and health providers in health facilities and community settings. These tools are useful in helping social science researchers quickly collect evidence of psychological drivers of behavior. To ensure that the data collected is of high quality, researchers can combine these tools with diagnostic approaches, where the focus is on collecting evidence to show that previously known behavioral drivers may be at play in the different contexts being examined. 
Effect of Integrated Maternal Nutrition Interventions on Nutrition Practices and Birth Weight – a Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Yvonne SERUBIBI UMURUNGI, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Co-authors :
Alemayehu Gebremariam, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 4
Engaging Communities for Health & Nutrition
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
SOULEY IBRAHIM, SCI
Lauren Bellhouse, Maternity Foundation
Ardhiani Dyah Priamsari, GAIN
Barry Pittendrigh, Purdue University
Moderators
Olukemi Akeju, Breakthrough ACTION Nigeria
Scientific Animations Without Borders: Connecting Communities to Create, Learn, and Scale Educational Interventions.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Barry Pittendrigh, Purdue University
Co-authors :
John Medendorp, Purdue University
Anne Lutomia, Purdue University
Julia Bello-Bravo, Purdue University
Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO) is a university-based research program focused on developing scalable behavior change tools with a specific focus on increasing inclusivity of indigenous and rare languages, low-literate learners, women, youth, and those who live across digital divides. These tools come from expertly created and vetted educational animations made available for use in educational programs as needed. Cross-community expert input is highly multi-disciplinary, inclusive of topic experts and experts in cultural appropriateness, to mention a few. Once created, SAWBO works with linguistic experts globally to place the content into diverse languages. Content is then made freely available to other organizations for educational and scaling purposes. The resultant content is used in research studies ranging from randomly controlled design experiments (RCTs) testing:Acceptability of content.Learning gains.Adoption of the educational content (behavior change).Innovations occur from those that adopt.However, the program's goal is to provide the necessary evidence that other organizations can cost-effectively scale this content in their programs. Thus, another level of behavior change of interest is that of institutional behavior change. We also present an ongoing meta-scale study looking at how other institutions have been involved in creating and using such content for their educational goals within their target audience contexts. We present an overview of studies supporting scaling and a meta-analysis of such scaling.
Tutorial Videos are as Effective as In-Person Training for Improving Community Volunteers' Knowledge for Implementing Emotional Demonstrations on Breastfeeding Practices
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Ardhiani Dyah Priamsari, GAIN
Co-authors :
Agnes Mallipu, Global Alliance For Improved Nutrition (GAIN)
Nindya Pamungkas
Vitria Dewi, East Java Provincial Health Office
Wendy Gonzales
Since 2018, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition has supported the Government of Indonesia in scaling up the implementation of interpersonal communication activities named emotional demonstrations (emo-demo) to improve breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices. Emo-demos are short, interactive sessions that intend to create habits by triggering the association of drivers, emotions, or interests with specific behaviours.Emo-demos have reached more than 290.000 caregivers by the end of 2021; however, in-person trainings of health volunteers (cadres) in charge of their implementation are costly and limit scale-up. GAIN conducted an evaluation to compare the effectiveness of tutorial videos vs in-person training in improving cadres' knowledge on breastfeeding emo-demos.GAIN developed 5-minute tutorial videos explaining how to implement a specific emo-demo. We then defined four different training groups: G1 viewed the tutorial videos once, G2 twice, and G3 thrice. G4 received in-person training with practice sessions and were not exposed to any videos. All groups received the same printed materials.We found that cadres who watched the tutorial videos twice or thrice (G2, G3) had significantly higher knowledge on all three emo-demos than those who participated in the in-person training (G4). In addition, cadres who received training by watching tutorials 2 or 3 times (G2 and G3) had consistently higher knowledge of all emo-demos than those who watched the tutorials once. Virtual training can effectively improve health volunteers' knowledge in contexts where technological resources and skills have been assessed and are available.
Testing the Limits of Digital Innovation: Experiences from a Maternal and Newborn Health Messaging Platform in Benin
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Lauren Bellhouse, Maternity Foundation
Co-authors :
Astrid Gronbaek, Maternity Foundation
Hyppolyte Aho, Plan International Benin
Rodrigue Dimon, Plan International Benin
Rosanna Rosengren-Klitgaard, PlanBornefonden
Pregnant women and new parents living in low-resource settings often lack access to accurate and timely information about pregnancy, childbirth, and best practices for caring for their newborns - especially if not frequently accessing health services. Information gaps can lead to the perpetuation of harmful practices and missed opportunities to support positive care-seeking behaviors. Digital health can help bridge these gaps, leading to behavior change, community/health facility linkages, and increased service utilization thereby contributing to improved maternal and neonatal health outcomes. But is it possible for a digital solution to evolve past the point of being helpful? A Danida-funded partnership between Maternity Foundation, Plan International, and the Benin Ministry of Health encouraged multi-phase innovative implementation research leveraging the increasing ownership of mobile devices across Benin, aiming to test both "low-tech" and "high-tech" solutions. By December 2021, the Lucy Mobile Messaging Platform reached 2,400 pregnant women, new mothers, and male partners in Benin through text and audio messages. The platform had an above average message completion rate (61%); qualitative feedback found it to be highly appreciated with relevant content and identified areas to improve user experience. A quantitative endline evaluation showed statistically significant differences between Lucy users and a comparison group in knowledge and self-reported behaviors related to key topics such as antenatal care, nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, reducing harmful practices, and early childhood development. Design research found that higher tech innovation would not be beneficial in the Benin context at this time.  
Le Cycle d’Action Communautaire : une Approche qui Engage la Communauté pour un Changement Social et de Comportement en Faveur de la Nutrition de la Femme Enceinte et du Jeune Enfant
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
SOULEY IBRAHIM, SCI
The Breakthrough ACTION and Hamzari projects in Niger collaborate to improve nutrition and WASH practices of children and pregnant women. The innovative community mobilization approach was established in Maradi region to identify and address problems in the community and then adopt local solutions to achieve sustainable social and behavior change. Communities in the villages explored and prioritized key issues and developed an action plan to address these problems. Once adopted, the community core group along monitored action plan implementation with coaching from the multisectoral community mobilization team made up of regional and municipal government leaders, Breakthrough ACTION and Hamzari. These community engagement activities have resulted in the adoption of priority behaviors related to the nutrition of pregnant women and children. The projects are working with partners and government stakeholders to document and share the process so that it can be replicated in new districts/communities across the country. This interest in replication demonstrates a growing understanding of the value of the community engagement approach ensuring that mentoring at the center of this activity that Breakthrough ACTION promotes. (176)
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Reda 5
Giving a Shot in the Arm to Immunization with SBC
Format : Panel Presentation
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Immunization | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Stefanie Friedhoff, Brown University School Of Public Health
Ifeoma Ike, Pink Cornrows
Raihanah Ibrahim, Solina Center For International Development And Research
Michela Martini, IOM EHoA
Jitendra Awale, CGPP India, World Vision US
Moderators
Veronique Doyon, Cowater International
CORE Group Polio Project India’s Experience in Adapting Polio Communication Lessons in COVID-19 Pandemic Response.
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Jitendra Awale, CGPP India, World Vision US
Co-authors :
Roma Solomon, World Vision US
Manojkumar Choudhary, World Vision US
Rina Dey, CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP)
Across the globe, polio assets were deployed to respond to the pandemic. In India, the WHO's polio network supported surveillance and contact tracing. The CGPP, drawing from its core community engagement strengths and existing community-level assets (e.g., a network of community volunteers and influencers), also responded by building confidence among community members to deal with the pandemic. An investment in polio eradication is an investment for a strong health system ready for emergency response that could be the need of time, and continued strengthening of polio eradication infrastructure transition will help countries develop systems and be prepared for future health emergencies.
Reducing Vaccine Inequity Among Undocumented Migrants and Vulnerable Populations Through Effective Advocacy, Risk Communication and Community Engagement in Eastern and Southern Africa
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Michela Martini, IOM EHoA
Co-authors :
Carolyn Kipsang, IOM
Kit Leung , IOM
Mary Alai, IOM
Astrid Carruet, IOM
Abdi Hassan, IOM
Victoria Kajja, IOM
Joseph Yowela, IOM
Aggrey Achola, IOM
Tashbid Sattar, Iom
Introduction Access to healthcare services and current COVID-19 vaccination programs for undocumented migrants and vulnerable community members are still a challenge due to multi-faced factors. This study assesses the effectiveness of migration-sensitive advocacy process, risk communication and community engagement strategies in increasing the uptake of COVID 19 vaccination among UM-CM in Eastern and Southern African region MethodsBetween August and December 2021, IOM jointly with the Ministries of Health and COVID 19 stakeholders started an advocacy process for the inclusion of migrants into national COVID-19 vaccination plans in 10 countries in east and Southern Africa. A 5-pronged approach was designed for identifying priority locations, delivering tailored and context specific risk communication strategies and activation of out-reach interventions to increase vaccine uptake. Descriptive statistics including frequencies and percentages were conducted.Results:A total of 495 vaccinators were trained, and over 1.6 million persons were reached with COVID-19 risk communication messages.  Out of 939,313 vaccinations, 14.4% (118,369) were undocumented migrants while 85.6% were vulnerable community members. By countries, 63% of 16,826 persons vaccinated in South Sudan were migrants, 25% of 5981 in Djibouti, 40% of 2379 in Tanzania, 73% of 4279 in Somalia, 7% of 36,013 in Uganda and 7% of 831,994 in Ethiopia. Conclusion:Migration-sensitive advocacy, risk communication and community engagement are viable strategies to reach undocumented and vulnerable community members with COVID-19 vaccination. Scale up of these robust strategies are recommended to increase access and uptake of COVID 19 vaccination among UM-CM globally 
Routine Immunization Buddy System (RIBS): A Multi-Pronged Women Collective Approach for Social Behavioral Change Towards Improving Immunization Demand
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Raihanah Ibrahim, Solina Center For International Development And Research
Background: In Nigeria, barriers to immunization include a dearth of knowledge, and prevailing social norms that hamper women's economic status and agency. The Routine Immunization Buddy System (RIBS) sought to test the effectiveness of women collectives to provide access to information, economic empowerment opportunities, and social support to trigger behavior change in caregivers.Methodology: The study is a three-arm Randomized Controlled Trial implemented in two socially heterogenous LGAs in Kaduna state. Caregivers were provided interventions within buddy groups; Peer-led Knowledge sharing where caregivers share information on immunization and child health facilitated by a visual immunization hand tool and a theme song Economic empowerment through group loans and business support for caregivers to finance micro-businesses990 caregivers were randomly assigned to one of the three groups to receive: Both interventions (Group 1); Only Peer-led knowledge sharing (Group 2); and No intervention (control), over 18 months.Results: Evidence affirms that RIBS was effective in triggering the required behavior change, and resultant increase in vaccine uptake. Findings showed that a significantly lower proportion of children remained unimmunized at the endline compared to the baseline of the study. In addition, community-wide awareness of and reception to immunization services were observed. Implications: While there is no simple solution to improving immunization demand, a multi-pronged women collective solution empowers caregivers with intellectual, psychosocial and financial support to correct normative misperceptions, and ultimately catalyze positive behavior change to improve health outcomes.
Funding Capacity Building for Communications: Lessons Learned and Recommendations for Funders and Supporting Organizations
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Ifeoma Ike, Pink Cornrows
Stefanie Friedhoff, Brown University School Of Public Health
Co-authors :
Nohely Arteaga, Pink Cornrows
Erika Bonnevie
Adriana Diaz, Public Good Projects
Daisy Winner, Brown University School Of Public Health
In the United States, individuals who identify as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) have inequitable access to the Covid-19 vaccine and trustworthy information about the vaccine. This disparate access to healthcare and health information, and earned doubt and skepticism about the vaccine among BIPOC communities, is anchored in historical and present day systemic racism and has contributed to low rates of vaccination, disproportionate rates of Covid infections, serious illness and hospitalization across BIPOC communities.  To address these inequities and disparate health outcomes, a private foundation funded a one-year large-scale initiative across five cities in the United States. The aim of the initiative was to increase the capacity of community-based organizations (CBOs) to provide access to vaccinations, and to design and deliver hyper-local strategies to increase vaccine confidence among BIPOC communities, and subsequent vaccine uptake. Central to this initiative was a communications intervention, a collective of firms and institutions specializing in communications, social impact, misinformation and evaluation who worked with CBOs to build their capacity to plan, implement, evaluate, iterate, and replicate data-driven messaging. Varied CBO utilization of different aspects of the intervention provides important insights into the potentials and pitfalls of rapid-response programs supporting CBOs in this way.  We highlight important considerations for practitioners and funders as we detail factors that may have influenced the extent to which the communications intervention was adopted including funder reporting requirements and timelines, the intervention design, and the context in which the intervention was delivered. 
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Karam 2
Actionable Insights on ANC and Nutrition
Format : Panel Presentation
Speakers
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Ameet Babre, Nutrition International
Bashir Sunusi, Kano State Primary Health Care Management Board
Moderators
Stembile Mugore, Nil, World Vision US
Using Responsive Feedback Mechanism to Improve Group Antenatal Care (GANC) Services Delivery in Kano State
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Bashir Sunusi, Kano State Primary Health Care Management Board
Co-authors :
Tijjani Hussaini, Diabetic , Kano State Primary Health Care Management Board
Summary: Kano State Government adopted / implemented the Group Antenatal Care (GANC) service model in 242 Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities of the State as a vehicle to achieve an improved maternal health outcome in line with minimum service package (MSP) for health. The State Primary Health Care Management Board (SPHCMB) with support of Technical Advice Connect (TAConnect) conducted a responsive feedback study to understand how well the Technical Assistance (TA) guiding principles are being adhered to in the TA deployment. Kano State adopted The Curve approach to Responsive Feedback in strengthening PHC management capacity and rolling out the GANC model. In trying to achieve that, In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) were conducted with the relevant government officials, beneficiaries (service providers) and the TA provider while digital surveys were used to collect valuable feedback on the adherence of the TA provider to the TA principles. Findings revealed that the TA provider is agile, adaptive and iterative; promotes good governance in all its operations; applies principles of good TA and best practices in deployments; promotes a participatory and inclusive process, state ownership and sustainability; reduces dependencies by employing a capacity building rather than capacity filling approach to TA delivery; aligns with government systems and structures contributing to the PHC system strengthening. It was recommended that RF should be integrated in the delivery of MSP based on the learnings from the GANC to ensure wider impact and sustainability.Keywords: GANC, Responsive Feedback Mechanism (RFM), TAConnect, TA provider, TA Beneficiaries, The Curve Process
Use of Digital Media as Job Aids and Interpersonal Counselling Assistance for Frontline Health Workers: Experiences from NI’s Support to the Vitamin A Supplementation (VAS) Program in Three States of India
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Ameet Babre, Nutrition International
Ameet Babre, Nutrition International
Co-authors :
Mini Varghese, Nutrition International
Ritu Ghosh, Nutrition International
Mansi Shekhar, Nutrition International
Tuhina Verma, Nutrition International
Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) of children (6-59 months) is a proven low-cost intervention that can reduce all-cause mortality by up to 24%. In India, VAS rounds is delivered in community settings and was critical to organise maintaining physical distancing and following safety protocols during Covid 19. It meant limited opportunities of interpersonal communication among FLWs and beneficiaries. NI in consultation with the state governments developed 15 digital pictorial messages on benefits of Vit A and the COVID-adaptation in regional language that was disseminated through whatsapp groups. FLWs utilised these digital messages for generating awareness among families during VAS rounds. These messages reached to approximately 0.5 million FLWs and ~13 million beneficiaries in four rounds between 2021- 22 in three states of India. An independent assessment showed that 84% FLWs used the WhatsApp messages for counselling of beneficiaries; 390 FLWs and 700 mothers/caregivers found these messages useful to learn the benefits of VAS. The WhatsApp messages had positive impact on adherence to Covid-19 protocols at the VAS sessions: 72% sites ensured physical distancing, 73% ensured handwashing facility was available. The digital messages were easy and quick to circulate among FLWs and beneficiaries and allowed quick adaptations at nominal costs. The messages are easy to store (requires only a smartphone) and can be retrieved in case of loss of data. They are attractive and allow interactive learning. NI's experience in digital messages showed that it can be used to improve knowledge levels of frontline workers and beneficiaries.
Behavioral Outcomes from the Reduction in Anemia Through Normative Innovations (RANI) Project in Odisha, India: Promoting Iron and Folic Acid Consumption in a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
09:15AM - 10:30AM
Presented by :
Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University
Co-authors :
Bee-Ah Kang, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Erica Sedlander, University Of California, San Francisco
Rohini Ganjoo, The George Washington University
Hagere Yilma, Boston University
Ichhya Pant
Lipika Patro, IPE Global Limited
Satyanarayan Mohanty, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
Manoj Kumar Parida, DCOR Consulting Private Limited
Minati Swain , DCOR Consulting Private Limited
Anemia in India (57% and 67% among women and children, respectively) has increased recently, despite the government's ongoing efforts. Gender power dynamics often impede improvements in women's health, but social norms-based interventions can address these barriers. Based on the theory of normative social behavior, we conducted a cluster randomized trial to promote iron and folic acid (IFA) consumption among women of reproductive age. We assessed whether the trial increased IFA consumption through social norms. The intervention included videos and education modules delivered by community facilitators. Communication materials were designed to change descriptive norms (perceptions about others' behaviors), injunctive norms (pressures to conform), and collective norms (the actual behavior). We collected data at baseline, midline, and end-line to assess whether improvements in social norms and their interaction with the intervention increased IFA consumption. All three norms improved at a higher rate in the treatment, compared to control, arm (p< .001). Improvements in descriptive and collective norms were associated with IFA consumption (β=.03, p< 001; β=.14, p< .001). Change in descriptive norms interacted with the intervention to affect the outcome (β=.08, p< .001). Findings reveal that field trials can improve social norms in measurable ways; improvements in norms can affect behavioral outcomes (both perceptually through descriptive and injunctive norms and objectively through collective norms). When people's observations about changes in their community are highlighted (and thus legitimized), the process of change can accelerate. This unique randomized field trial also allows us to make causal inferences about the influence of social norms on behaviors.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Poster Space
Poster Presentations
Format : Poster Presentations
Speakers
Suniti Neogy, CARE
Philip Bill Okaka
Tabby Nyanjui, Voluntary Service Overseas
Robert Magezi, AVSI Foundation
Sylvia Mariettah Katende, UNICEF
Mitiku Telilla, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Miriam Nagadya Lwanga, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Mandi Chikombero, UNICEF Uganda
Enoch Kassenyi, UNICEF
Hellen Onyango, Voluntary Service Overseas
Susan Ontiri, Population Services International (PSI)
Lovemore Magombo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Apry Selwin Leokuna, Save The Children
Retno Indrawati, Save The Children
Natalie Tibbels, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Michela Martini, IOM EHoA
Demi Priscilla Duah, Total Family Health Organization
Andrews Adjieteh, Total Family Health Organisation
Joao Bosse, PCI Media
Helena Bon, UNICEF ESARO
Victoria Marijani, Save The Children
Albert Legrand Fosso, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Benita Izere, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mohamed Sangare, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Judi Aubel, Grandmother Project - Change Through Culture
Megan Williams, Splash International
Mouhamadou Lamine BALDE, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Marjorie Nana, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Benjamin Hickler, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Mamadou Mbaye, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
ISSIAGA DAFFE, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Frehiwot Belete, Splash International
Marilena Crosato, IOM UN Migration
Mutsa Tsvamuno
Heather Chotvacs, FHI360
Mary Packard, P-W Consulting
Chris Dickey, New York University
Karen McDonnell, George Washington University
Emily Zimmerman, Ideas42
Rachel James, RCCE Collective Service
DATA FOR THE PEOPLE: A COLLECTIVE APPROACH FOR EQUITABLE AND OPEN DATA FOR THE COVID-19 RESPONSE
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Rachel James, RCCE Collective Service
Co-authors :
Vincent Turmine, RCCE Collective Service
Ginger Johnson , United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Behaviours drive epidemics, they can also stop them. Effective risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) requires sociobehavioural data to identify ways to influence, predict, and mitigate the role people play in the spread of disease. This means understanding people's changing perceptions and attitudes, and the barriers and enablers influencing their ability and motivation to adopt and/or sustain positive healthy behaviours. Unfortunately, coordination and collaboration in social data collection and analysis prior to COVID-19 was severely lacking. In order to fill this gap and facilitate collective action for an institutionalised data and analysis mechanism, the RCCE Collective Service (CS) initiated an easy access RCCE Behavioural Dashboard to keep a pulse on people's perception, attitudes, questions and opinions related to COVID-19.The CS Behavioural Dashboard is a first-of-its-kind repository of social and behavioural data on COVID-19, covering 198 countries and consisting of over 250,000 data points from 411 different data sources. The Dashboard aims to track how information, knowledge, perception, and practices are changing in the context of COVID-19. The Behavioural Dashboard is an initiative borne out of the CS's commitment to ensure critical social and behavioural information is equitably available at all levels and in all countries (wherever possible) for response actors working to end the COVID-19 pandemic. Beginning January 2020, insights drawn from the Dashboard have influenced and enhanced cocreation and codesign of people-centred interventions, policy decisions, and the incorporation social behavioural change communications (SBCC) into broader public health programming globally.
Girl-led activism and movement building: A model of INGO support and facilitation
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Suniti Neogy, CARE
Co-authors :
Anne Sprinkel , CARE
Grannies' Tea Groups Move Mountains
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Tinny B Seitei, Stepping Stones International
Accelerating Adolescent Involvement for Better Health Outcomes: The Uganda West Nile Adolescent Volunteer Experience
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Mandi Chikombero, UNICEF Uganda
Enoch Kassenyi, UNICEF
Sylvia Mariettah Katende, UNICEF
Miriam Nagadya Lwanga, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Robert Magezi, AVSI Foundation
In 2019 in a bid to boost adolescent involvement in key development issues including health, UNICEF in collaboration with the Government of Uganda worked with adolescent groups to co-create an Adolescent Volunteer Initiative (AVI). To date, the initiative has recruited and empowered 1005 adolescents in seven districts.AVI is a methodology and leadership growth path used to enable adolescents to participate in decision making, information dissemination, and service delivery processes that directly or indirectly contribute to their development and wellbeing. In 2020, to address growing adolescent challenges including sexually transmitted infections, adolescent pregnancies, drugs and alcohol, UNICEF supported partner AVSI to roll out the AVI in four districts. The roll out included (a) orientation of district staff in the four districts development of action plans and (b) identification, recruitment, orientation, and deployment of 150 Adolescent Volunteers (AVs) from selected sub-counties across the districts. AVs were clustered in groups of 10, assigned a chaperone and attached to a health facility in their sub-counties. Between July 2020 and June 2021, the AVs reached approximately 30,000 people (57% adolescents, 21% caregivers- parents, guardians, health workers, and 22% community leaders) with integrated health messages including on COVID-19 prevention. The AV support contributed to an increase in demand for adolescent health services such as antenatal care by teenage mothers, increased community/family mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) screening of children under 5 years for malnutrition and observance of COVID-19 preventive measures such as proper use of masks and hand washing. 
Community-led Complementary Feeding and Learning Sessions (CCFLS) positively impact young children feeding practices: the experience in Ethiopia
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Mitiku Telilla, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Co-authors :
Mesfin Hirbaye, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Amy Ellis, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Community-led Complementary Feeding and Learning Sessions (CCFLS) are an impactful community-based SBC approach. CCFLS includes a total of 12 consecutive sessions for a group of 15 mothers/caregivers and is facilitated by trained Health Extension Workers (HEWs) and Community Health and Nutrition Promoters (CHNPs). Each session lasts for about 2 hours and includes cooking demonstrations, child feeding and caring support, and nutrition education.Introduced in Ethiopia in 2019 as part of the USAID's Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (BHA) five-year Development Food Security Activity (DFSA), CCFLS aims to prevent malnutrition in children aged 6 - 23 months with growth faltering through improved child feeding and caring behaviors. The program seeks to enhance and sustain food, nutrition and livelihood security and compliments Ethiopia's government productive safety net program. Program participants greatly valued that CCFLS brought their peers together, allowed them to discuss challenges, and built community support. Positive health and nutrition outcomes have been observed. Mothers started feeding children fruits, stopped giving pre-lacteal feeds, learnt how to prepare porridges from locally available ingredients, and ensured that food was available for the child to be fed by other family members when they are away.  Among children aged 6-24 months with growth faltering who participated in CCFLS, 85% showed weight gain of 250g or more by the end of the sessions. The inclusion of weight measurement (upon admission to and discharge from CCFLS) which objectively verified outcomes kept mothers motivated and built trust, further enhancing the impact and sustainability of the approach. 
Increasing speed while maintaining quality: Lessons learned in adapting adolescent nutrition social and behavior change communication materials from Ethiopia to Tanzania
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Victoria Marijani, Save The Children
In Tanzania, where 14-18% of adolescents experience malnutrition (TDHS 2010, 2015), the evidence base on adolescent nutrition (AN) has been limited and few nutrition social and behavior change communication (SBCC) materials for adolescents exist. In 2019, Lishe Endelevu, a five-year activity funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), faced the challenge of ensuring the rapid implementation of nutrition SBCC programming to improve nutrition outcomes among adolescents in four regions of Tanzania. The Activity made the strategic decision to use the same priority behaviors and adapt evidence-based AN SBCC materials used by USAID/Empowering New Generations to Improve Nutrition and Economic Opportunities Activity in Ethiopia. Adaptation steps included: (1) Review the evidence base on adolescent nutrition in Tanzania and Ethiopia and prioritize nutrition behaviors; (2) Procure copies of AN SBCC materials from Ethiopia and adapt them to the Tanzanian context; (3) Pretest the adapted materials with adolescent girls, mothers and fathers of adolescent girls, and teachers; (4) Use the pretest findings to make further revisions to adjust to local Tanzanian context; (5) Submit the materials and pretest report to government authorities for technical review; (6) Incorporate technical feedback to finalize the materials; (7) Reproduce and disseminate the materials; (8) Train teachers and community volunteers to use the materials; and (9) Monitor implementation and document lessons learned. In less than 2 years from adapting the set of 8 adolescent nutrition SBCC materials from Ethiopia to the Tanzania context, Lishe Endelevu reached 625 teachers and 3952 community health workers.
Capacity strengthening in social inclusion positively influences health care workers’ attitudes and behaviour towards service delivery to persons with disabilities
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Philip Bill Okaka
Tabby Nyanjui, Voluntary Service Overseas
Hellen Onyango, Voluntary Service Overseas
Susan Ontiri, Population Services International (PSI)
Challenges accessing quality care are particularly acute for young women with disabilities seeking to exercise their right to sexual and reproductive health services. These include structural barriers limiting physical access to health facilities, lack of information and communication materials tailored to meet their needs, and health care providers' negative attitudes and lack of knowledge and skills about Persons with Disabilities (PWDs). To demonstrate that capacity strengthening on social inclusion can positively influence Health Care worker's attitudes and behaviour towards service delivery for PWDs, the DESIP programme committed to enhancing the capacity of Health Care Workers (HCWs) and County Health Management Teams as key actors during the first year of project implementation (2019/20). DESIP supported the mapping of Disabled Persons Organizations, developed disability mainstreaming guides and information, educational and communication materials in braille and Kenya Sign Language format. HCWs trained from the 19 DESIP supported counties reported initiatives aimed at improving access to care for PWDs and an increase in the number of PWDs reached with FP services. Health facilities continue to undertake self-initiative for staff sensitization on social inclusion and training on Kenya Sign Language, improve service accessibility for PWDs, targeted in-and-outreaches community mobilization, and allocate financial resources towards facilitating mobility and access to FP for PWDs. The DESIP training also led to facility discussions on reduction of stigma and negative attitude among HCWs towards PWDs, demystifying myths, stereotypes and misconception about disability and FP/SRH, and enabling adequate skilled health care workers to provide inclusive FP/SRH services.
Last Mile Health Marketing Activity: Dissemination of health Information and distribution of Health Commodities to rural communities in the northern, north-east and savannah of Ghana.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Andrews Adjieteh, Total Family Health Organisation
Demi Priscilla Duah, Total Family Health Organization
Health Marketing has most often been successful in the cities as compared to the villages, not to talk of hard-to-reach communities. It is obvious that several favorable conditions in the cities make health marketing possible and perhaps more profitable as it is often commercial in nature. The purpose of the activity was to improve access to health information and related highly impactful health commodities in rural communities in Northern, North-East and Savannah regions of Ghana through the establishment of a community-based distribution model. We offered small grants to community-based organizations (CBOs) as partners to carry out the activity. At the end of six (6) months, the CBO grantees successfully implemented the following: recruitment, training, and deployment of community members to distribute FP and related health products within their respective communities accompanied with health information and specific interventions. 13340 cycles of Secure oral contraceptives, 372 SATO pans, 1,030 condoms, 1,480 tubes of Chlorhexidine gel, and 134,800l hand sanitizers were distributed A total of 288 volunteers including the youth were deployed. This has offered great opportunity for the youth to be change agents in their communities, a model which ensures that communities are able to address urgent health issues at anytime. Including the youth in this activity provided the opportunity for their colleagues to patronize community level FP commodities and services. At least a total of 4851 individuals including the youth were reached with key messages on FP, Cord care, WASH, through the community-based distribution activity
REAL Fathers approach with SBCC strategies for child’s better nutrition and gender equality parenting practice at home: A best practice in Rural Sumba-Indonesia.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Apry Selwin Leokuna, Save The Children
Retno Indrawati, Save The Children
The critical role that the child's father plays in improving a child's health and nutrition in the same household is being recognized more and more. More attention is being focused on incorporating the child's father into counselling interventions, such as parenting sessions.However, the evidence in West Sumba shows that fathers' participation was lower than mothers. Parenting classes in West Sumba showed that fathers' participation was 17,9%, compared to mothers which was 82%. Moreover, the average of parenting intervention in West Sumba to lower the prevalence of Stunting was 16,3%. Stunting data of 0-59 months of children in West Sumba showed an increase. In 2020, the percentage was 25,90%, while in 2021, it rose to 28,8%.REAL (Responsible, Engaged, And Loving) Father is an approach that involves the participation of parents, especially fathers, in parenting practices. This approach has been used in Save the Children Indonesia programs, to promote positive parenting values, strengthen positive gender norms, and involve men's participation in equal parenting practices at home. Using local language adaptations and audio messages to convey key messages in parenting sessions, parenting practices have succeeded in increasing fathers' awareness of their role and the importance of father-child involvement from infancy to adulthood especially in decreasing stunting prevalence in West Sumba to 22,7% in 2022. This approach hopefully, can share experiences and inform other programs specifically designed for the role of fathers in parenting.
Shifts in gender attitudes and self-efficacy related to child protection: insights from a community-based project to end child marriage in Malawi
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Alfred Mang'ando, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Lovemore Magombo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Natalie Tibbels, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Beth Mallalieu, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Jennifer Boyle, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Maria Elena Figueroa, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Child, early, and forced marriage (CEFM) has many negative impacts on the lives of girls and women, including disrupted education, early childbearing and associated risks of morbidity and mortality. More than 4 in 10 girls in Malawi are married before the age of 18 despite recent changes in policy to end child marriages. Drivers include poverty, social norms, and individual attitudes and beliefs of both caregivers and girls and young women themselves. Since 2020, Breakthrough ACTION, in partnership with local NGOs offered multi-session dialogue-based groups with adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), adolescent boys and young men (ABYM), and fathers and mothers. These groups addressed leadership, goal-setting, gender norms, harmful traditional practices with a focus on CEFM, and advocacy for the protection of girls and women. To monitor changes on CEFM opinion and attitudes that could be taking place as a result of the Breakthrough ACTION project groups, we collected qualitative data among AGYW, ABYM, and within their households. We conducted 16 focus group discussions (FGDs) across 4 project sites and post-tests from AGYW (n=381) and ABYM (n=316) to explore aspirations, attitudes, and self-efficacy. The results indicate that participants experienced positive changes across thematic areas discussed in the groups: educational aspirations, gender equitable norms, shared household responsibilities, and a commitment to advocating for their rights and ending harmful practices. Insights from the monitoring activities reinforce the benefits of community-based activities to shift attitudes, and findings informed project re-design going into its second year.
Understanding social and behaviour drivers to improve immunization demand and uptake among migrants and refugees in the Eastern and Southern Africa Region
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Helena Bon, UNICEF ESARO
Michela Martini, IOM EHoA
Co-authors :
Sofia De Almeida, UNICEF ESARO
Charles Ogbanufe, IOM
Equitable access to vaccines entails including vulnerable population such as migrants, refugees, internal displaced persons (IDPs) and asylum seekers, regardless of their legal status or documentation. The significant higher risk of severe disease or death by this sociodemographic group is recognized by SAGE and moreover, their vulnerabilities have been exacerbated due to the secondary effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.[1] Furthermore, limited engagement of health system with this population groups deepens challenges on accessing immunization services. [2] They are more likely to suffer physical, mental health and socioeconomic consequences of COVID-19 and therefore need to be included in planning purposes. Previous analysis reveals that the inclusion of these vulnerable population groups in national vaccination plans in Eastern and Southern Africa region is not systematic, and there is a dissonance between their inclusion in plans and actually accessing COVID-19 immunization services[3]. Ensuring regular social and behavioural data collection is critical to increase evidence-based advocacy, inform effective and targeted interventions and improve equitable demand for and uptake of COVID-19 immunization services.[1] World Health Organization. (‎2021)‎. WHO SAGE roadmap for prioritizing uses of COVID-19 vaccines in the context of limited supply: an approach to inform planning and subsequent recommendations based on epidemiological setting and vaccine supply scenarios. (20 October 2020, latest update 16 July 2021). WHO[2] Mukumbang, F.C., Ambe, A.N. & Adebiyi, B.O. Unspoken inequality: how COVID-19 has exacerbated existing vulnerabilities of asylum-seekers, refugees, and undocumented migrants in South Africa. Int J Equity Health19, 141 (2020). 
'Ouro Negro da Malta': Amplifying Youth Voices through SBCC
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Joao Bosse, PCI Media
Co-authors :
Elena Colonna, PCI Media
Juvência Mahumana, PCI Media
David Wood, PCI Media
Meesha Brown, PCI Media
Cultural traditions, unequal gender relations and limited access to information represent the main factors that affect adolescents' rights and well-being in Mozambique. 'Ouro Negro da Malta' is an adolescent-led SBCC radio program produced by young people and for young people. For many, it is the only source of information on critical topics that affect younger populations, particularly sexual and reproductive health, education, child marriage, and gender equity.  Analysis of qualitative results, including testimonials, indicates that young people are engaged in the program. 'Ouro Negro da Malta' demonstrates that if properly supported by adults, adolescents, especially girls, use the program to redefine their life, their perspectives for the future, and their roles in the community. Programs like these can also help inform future initiatives implemented in partnership with youth and marginalized groups.  The discussion will explore both the successes and the challenges of facilitating meaningful participation of adolescents in SBCC programs that address adolescent issues, as well as important considerations, such competing priorities affecting youth and adult engagement critical to achieving social behavior change objectives.  
Sciences sociales impliquées en contexte humanitaire : De l’hésitation vaccinale à l’acceptation de la vaccination contre le Covid-19 par le personnel de santé au Cameroun
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Albert Legrand Fosso, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Food for Thought: Expanding our Understanding of Structural Determinants of Nutrition Behaviors
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Lana Khoury
Gretchen Thompson, FHI360
Delilah Takawira, FHI360
Co-authors :
Claire Gillum, FHI360
Grandmothers: Powerful catalysts for change for adolescent girls health and development
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Judi Aubel, Grandmother Project - Change Through Culture
Les partenariats pour avancer l’équité dans la protection des couches vulnérables au Sénégal: répondant aux besoins des enfants talibés dans la riposte contre la COVID-19.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Marjorie Nana, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mouhamadou Lamine BALDE, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Benita Izere, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mamadou Mbaye, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Mohamed Sangare, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
ISSIAGA DAFFE, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Depuis mars 2020, le Sénégal traverse une crise sans précédent avec la COVID-19. L'impact est la plus dure pour les couches vulnérables. Le gouvernement du Sénégal a mis en place un plan d'urgence afin d'accompagner les populations; cet effort, fort appréciable, ne permettait pas de couvrir les besoins des populations les plus vulnérables. Des enfants « talibés », évoluant dans les écoles coraniques traditionnelles (daaras), vivent dans des situations de précarité accentuées marquées par une promiscuité, une insalubrité et un déficit alimentaire. C'est ainsi que Breakthrough ACTION avec ses partenaires gouvernementaux ont développé une initiative de prévention de la COVID-19 ciblant les daaras de six régions. Ayant obtenu l'engagement et le soutien financier de divers acteurs à travers le plaidoyer, l'initiative a permis de fournir les informations sur la COVID-19 et de doter les enfants en équipements de protection individuelle pour minimiser ainsi les risques d'exposition au virus. Le projet a aussi remis des kits alimentaires pour atténuer les effets liés à l'état d'urgence, au couvre-feu et au ralentissement de l'activité économique. Le succès de cette initiative a encouragé les partenaires à continuer à considérer les besoins de ce groupe, extrêmement vulnérable, dans ses stratégies de prévention de la COVID-19. Les programmes de riposte doivent intégrer  les stratégies pour  l'équité pour s'assurer que les efforts de prévention n'excluent pas les communautés  hautement marginalisées. Les partenariats stratégiques multisectoriels avec les acteurs du secteur privé, de l'Etat et des partenaires appuient la réussite des initiatives d'équité.
Learning from Experience: Findings from an SBC Review of USAID Development Food Security Activities
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Michael Manske, United States Agency For International Development (USAID)
Co-authors :
Andrea Warren, USAID
Mary Packard, P-W Consulting
Ethical considerations for applying behavioural insights approaches with children
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Benjamin Hickler, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
In the last decade there has been a global trend to apply approaches informed by evidence and methods from the behavioral sciences to achieve Social and Behavior Change program and policy objectives. This talk provides a focused reflection on unique and important ethical considerations for applying "behavioral insights" approaches to work that implicates children. The talk describes the results of a collaboration between UNICEF's Office of Research-Innocenti, the Behavioural Insights Team, and the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University to undertake a systematic exploration of relevant literature along with direct consultations with youth in Australia, Chile, and Ghana on the subject. The literature review, interviews with experts, consultations with youth, and pretesting with potential end users were used to develop a simple set of resources for practitioners. The talk will outline the process and describe the resulting three core principles and a checklist of 10 process criteria to help practitioners navigate ethical considerations specific to applying behavioral insights approaches to programming with children.
Reaching scalable solutions within the WASH sector in Addis Ababa
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Frehiwot Belete, Splash International
Megan Williams, Splash International
Co-authors :
Addisu Shewamoltot, Splash International
What does it take to truly reach a scalable solution that involves behavior change? Splash's program in Addis Ababa is on target. As this international NGO has moved from a grand idea -- ensuring all children in urban school settings have access and improved hygiene practices -- into action.  Splash has designed child-focused water, sanitation, hygiene (WASH) and menstrual health solutions with government partners in one of the lowest-resource and dense cities in the country.With over a decade of experience implementing WASH projects in nearly 2,000 child-serving institutions (orphanages, schools, shelters, and feeding centers), Splash embarked on their largest project yet: Project WISE (WASH in Schools for Everyone).  Through Project WISE, Splash set out to design a program that could scale. And a key component was partnering with the Government of Ethiopia to reach 100% of government schools in Addis Ababa with improved WASH infrastructure; behavior change programs for students and adults; and menstrual health solutions for girls. In keeping with the core elements of reaching scale, Splash created a model that can be easily replicated across cities nationally.For over a decade, handwashing has been at the center of Splash's work and as a result, are driven by the belief that an integration of handwashing is a key outcome for practitioners and policy makers who want to achieve strong healthy practices to fight off communicable diseases such as COVID. Handwashing is having its movement and Splash will discuss how to capture this attention to bring forth results.
Bridging mental health and awareness raising with returned migrants in West Africa: the experience of peer support groups.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Marilena Crosato, IOM UN Migration
Harmful religious norms and social injustices affecting women and children in Marange area of Mutare District, Zimbabwe: The Role of SBCC in reshaping power dynamics in closed communities.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Delilah Takawira, FHI360
Mary Packard, P-W Consulting
Heather Chotvacs, FHI360
Mutsa Tsvamuno
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed and exacerbated health and wealth inequalities globally, and especially in closed communities, with the potential to stall development efforts and widen social inequalities in low- and middle-income countries. Takunda, a USAID funded Resilience and Food Security Activity is working in Mutare district, eastern Zimbabwe, an area inhabited by the Marange Apostolic Faith Sect. Takunda promotes sustainable, equitable, and resilient food, nutrition, and income security amongst poor and vulnerable households, using cross-cutting Social and Behavior Change (SBC) approaches. To help inform design of the SBC interventions, Takunda conducted formative research in September 2021 to understand behavioral determinants influencing selected behaviors, including people's knowledge, perceptions, and feelings about target behaviors, and to identify appropriate practices to promote. Findings revealed deeply rooted religious norms that negatively impact women and children, and a social system supporting male dominance and limiting socio-economic progress.  The Marange Apostolic Faith Sect is a religious group with strict norms characterized by shunning medical care, polygamy (one man having as many as twenty wives), huge families (driven by the prohibition of modern family planning methods) and early marriage (girls marrying older men). These norms contribute to high rates of child mortality and poverty; children do not complete school, and women are widely dominated by men, who control household resources and decision-making. Takunda will share these findings together with innovative SBC approaches designed to work within the system to shift social norms, enhance women's agency, and improve child and family welfare.
Empowering Adolescent Girls in Ethiopia to Improve Their Dietary Practices
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Tamirat Walissa, FHI360
Co-authors :
Abdulaziz Ali Oumer, FHI360
Sunny Kim, International Food Policy Research Institute
Improving dietary practices among adolescent girls can lay the foundation for protecting the nutrition and health of current and future generations. In Ethiopia, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded the Alive & Thrive (A&T) project to implement a package of adolescent-led nutrition interventions through government schools. The interventions sought to improve the diet of adolescent girls 10–14 years of age, enrolled in primary schools in one agrarian region (Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples or SNNP) and one pastoralist region (Somali) in Ethiopia. School-based activities were designed to address knowledge gaps, motivations and barriers affecting the food consumption patterns of adolescent girls.  It is an example of a multi-sectoral approach where the Bureau of Education took the lead with support from the Bureau of Health and Local Government. Interactive and empowering school-based activities were designed with student involvement. Key participants in the program design and implementation in addition to adolescent girls included student peers, schoolteachers and principals, health extension workers, and parents, who were identified as most influential persons. Each group was assigned specific roles for supporting improved dietary practices and self-efficacy. Application of social and behavior change principles to intervention design and implementation of interactive school-based activities aimed at empowering adolescent girls, led to positive changes in their dietary practices. Primary schools may be effective channels for delivering and scaling up interventions to improve diets of adolescent girls sustainably.
Evaluation of a virtual living toolkit to facilitate collaboration towards the prevention of FGM/C
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Karen McDonnell, George Washington University
Co-authors :
Krishna Patel, George Washington University
Ghada Khan, Muslim Health Professional Association
Khadijah Abdullah, RAHMA
Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) is a procedure for the partial or total removal of external female genitalia for non-medical purposes and affects over 200 million women and girls worldwide. To date the prevention of FGM/C has been neglected, the responsibility has been siloed, and misinformation has persisted. Collaboration between survivors, health care providers, faith-based leaders, and men is needed. To that end our project developed an online virtual living evidence based resource (fgmtoolkit.gwu.edu) for multiple audiences to increase awareness and responsibility for the prevention of FGM/C using a multimedia format with first person stories. This presentation will present the alpha and beta testing of the toolkit among our key interested parties with a particular focus on the collaboration between female survivors of FGM/C and health care providers for the secondary prevention of FGM/C in the US. A total of over 200 women and health and social care providers and trainees completed the evaluation and the findings demonstrated the toolkit had a high level of usability and utility and that self-paced interaction with the the toolkit materials significantly increased participant awareness, knowledge, and self-efficacy. For many, the toolkit was their first time learning about FGM/C, dispelled existing myths, and created a common vernacular to enhance communications and foster collaborations. A virtual living toolkit can be regularly updated to create fresh content thus having the ability to readily address the needs and strengths of the respective audiences and ensure misinformation does not persist. 
Behavioral Communication Strategies for Global Epidemics: An Innovative Model for Public Health Education and Humanitarian Response
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Chris Dickey, New York University
In response to a number of complex global health challenges, NYU School of Global Public Health (GPH) and UNICEF designed a Behavioral Communication Strategies for Global Epidemics (BCSE) course that brings together UN professionals, government staff and MPH students to design innovative behavior change communication strategies that address disease outbreaks and humanitarian challenges around the world. Applying a systems approach, participants in the course work on interdisciplinary teams to design strategies, develop skills, and engage in global learning. At the culmination of the course, all teams present strategies to UNICEF country offices for implementation. This innovative model for public health education and humanitarian response provides professionals with an opportunity to develop a wide range of competencies, including systems thinking, behavior change, and human-centered design, and equips them with the necessary tools to develop more novel approaches to behavior change communication. As the number of humanitarian challenges increase each year, this format for learning can serve as a model for how professionals can effectively address these complex crises.
Adolescent Girls as Agents of Change
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presented by :
Sara Flanagan, Ideas42
Co-authors :
Emily Zimmerman, Ideas42
Andrew Gidudu, Marie Stopes Uganda
Francis Aucur, Marie Stopes International
Arielle Gorstein, Ideas42
Julius Twesigye, Marie Stopes Uganda
Faith Kyateka, Marie Stopes Uganda
Samuel Balamaga, Marie Stopes Uganda
Alison Buttenheim
Pregnancies during adolescence can significantly jeopardize girls' health and economic futures, and yet family planning (FP) use among this population remains low. Existing interventions to increase FP use among youth may fall short because they don't smartly engage the population they intend to serve. Drawing from research in other contexts showing that giving advice to others can encourage action by building confidence and motivation, we developed a program that positions girls as advocates for FP among their peers and keeps girls' agency in mind – placing them as both active participants in and as recipients of the program. Through interviews with adolescents, community-based mobilizers, and service providers, we identified behavioral barriers contributing to high unmet need for FP among Ugandan adolescents, which persist even when services are available and affordable. With MSI Reproductive Choices and Mare Stopes Uganda, we designed a "Refer a Friend" (RAF) program where girls who use contraceptives or have received FP counseling use small, colorful cards to engage in conversations with friends and encourage them to visit health facilities for FP counseling and friendship wristbands. Clinic materials reinforce a welcoming environment for girls, and providers from a subset of clinics received a training on youth-friendly service provision.We conducted a randomized controlled field trial and found that the program significantly increased adolescent FP uptake by 45%, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results underscore that empowering girls as peer advocates and offering a welcoming clinic environment can meaningfully improve access to important health services.
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Tea Break
Format : Tea Break
11:15AM - 12:45PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Plenary Session - Social Movements for Social Change : What Makes Them Tick and What Can We Learn?
Format : Plenary
Speakers
Mohmaed Mahmoud
Avexnim Cojti Ren
Social movements are crucial for social change at both global and local levels. People working together in networks to identify issues of common concern and take strategic steps to change policies, improve equity, advance rights and affect the structural forces that create many development issues, have been vital for development progress. Whether this is regarding land rights; civil rights; language protection and advancement; gender equity; stigma reduction; girls education; voting rights; or hundreds if not thousands of other local, global and national issues, social change action at this level is crucial for specific progress across all SDGs on the development priority spectrum.This session will Identify effective ways to relate to and progress organic social movements relevant to your work priorities.This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Lunch Break
02:00PM - 03:30PM
Aud des Ambassadeurs and Aud des Ministries
Plenary Session - Public Sector Leadership in Social and Behavior Change
Format : Plenary
Public sector policies and actions regulate behaviors and promote societal change in a variety of ways, such as through the application of law or by directing conduct through default rules, regulations, and social nudges. Governmental adoption of SBC approaches, tools, and interventions contributes to societal development by challenging entrenched racial, gender, and socio-economic hierarchies.Many pressing health and social issues of today such as the recent COVID-19 pandemic or gender-based discrimination have emphasized the significance of public leadership and governmental adoption of SBC to influence public and private behaviors and social practices by creating an enabling environment for change. Governments around the world have used a variety of approaches and strategies, such as incentives, bans and mandates, information campaigns, and nudges, to promote change in numerous areas. This session will be livestreamed at sbccsummit.org.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Poster Space
Poster Presentations
Format : Poster Presentations
Speakers
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Saif Ul Hadi, IAVI
Olayinka Umar-Farouk, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Kavita Ayyagari, Howard Delafield International
Ibukunoluwa Sanni, ARDA Development Communication Incorporated
Sitora Shokamolova, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Fidelis Awonodomo Da-uri, Amplio Ghana
Veronique Doyon, Cowater International
Sarah-Jean Cunningham, Magenta
Kathryn Bertram, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Sacha St-Onge Ahmad, University Of Maryland
Chelsi Campbell, Duke University And North Carolina State University
Chizoba Onyechi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Maksim Fazlitdinov, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
Victor Orozco-Olvera, World Bank
Cori Fordham, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Josie Gallo, Peripheral Vision International
Raffat Shuja, Bedari Pakistan
Dina Borzekowski, University Of Maryland
Julia Bello-Bravo, Purdue University
Namita Brij Mohandas, Howard Delafield International
Cliodhna Ryan
Megan Westervelt, Ohio University & InitialEyes (nonprofit)
Saumya Pant, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA
Katinka Moonen, Oxfam Novib
Multidisciplinary Experience Design and Gamified Learning to Spark Community Conversations on HIV Science in India
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Saif Ul Hadi, IAVI
Co-authors :
Devi Leena Bose, Vegetarian, International Aids Vaccine Initiative
Kashma Goyal, DCT Mindlinks
Monib Ahmad, IAVI
The Good Participatory Practice guidelines (UNAIDS and AVAC, 2011) recognize barriers to understanding HIV science as one of the major roadblocks to equitable and mutually beneficial collaboration between communities and HIV research teams. To address this, we experimented with experiential learning and gamification techniques to help democratize and humanize HIV science for communities through simulated experiences and community conversations. We identified common information needs of communities and the primary reasons for mistrust in HIV research. These centered around a lack of understanding of current gaps in HIV science, and how collaborative research could bridge them to improve human understanding of critical aspects such as HIV viral diversity, latency, drug resistance, and broadly neutralizing antibodies. To explain these complex concepts through relevant and culturally appropriate experiences, we designed simulation games to help deconstruct the fundamental biological mechanisms of HIV using familiar metaphors and cultural references. We piloted these games through 12 community workshops across Maharashtra, Kerala and Delhi, and learned that: 1) community conversations were most productive when conducted in groups of 15-20; 2) the optimal duration for such simulation games was 15-20 minutes; and 3) communities found it easier and considerably more enjoyable to learn about the biology of HIV and the scientific implications of research through games and simulated experiences. The potential for innovative pedagogies and multidisciplinary co-creation with communities looks promising and can play an important role in strengthening dialog between researchers and communities, and catalyzing better informed and more equitable participation in HIV research.
Peer to peer social research in a COVID-19 era: preparing the next generation of young Social and Behaviour Change researchers in Tajikistan
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Sitora Shokamolova, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Tajikistan is a country in Central Asia, which inherited the central planning governance model with little or nominal participation of people at the policy level. Voices of young people, especially girls, are particularly unheard in the agenda-setting. Yet adolescents and young people aged 10 to 25 comprise 40 % of the total population in Tajikistan and represent a huge force for development. To address this, UNICEF Tajikistan in collaboration and guidance from its headquarters initiated a process of developing and testing a model of children and young people participation in research. The research topic to test this model was around how young people's mental health was affected by the latest COVID-19 crisis. As a result, 100 young researchers were trained to conduct the research and advocate for a topic of concern through participation at the national-level meaning making workshop and sharing their self-produced digital story, which will be published through social media channels. For the first time in history of the country, young people were formally engaged in peer-to-peer research and their voices heard for programmatic change.
MALASUR - MAKING THE INVISIBLE, VISIBLE WITH THE DEMON OF DEFECA
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Varinder Kaur Gambhir , BBC Media Action, India
Co-authors :
Reethira Kumar, BBC Media Action, India
Using theater to foster collective action against a yellow fever outbreak in Bauchi state, Nigeria
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Olayinka Umar-Farouk, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Usman Inuwa, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Sandra Chipanta, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nura Bashir Faggo, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Victor Enangama, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Munkail Titilola, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito which continues to cause severe morbidity and mortality. As a priority country for the global Eliminate Yellow fever Epidemics (EYE), Nigeria has recorded repeated outbreaks since 2017. In 2021 alone, the country recorded 2,053 cases of yellow fever. Whereas, the estimated national immunization coverage for yellow fever as at 2020 was 54 percent, which is far below the 80 percent necessary to protect against outbreaks. More so, preventive measures being implemented seems to be ineffective against the outbreaks.For a sustained response to these outbreaks, the Breakthrough ACTION-Nigeria project through the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) reviewed previous risk communication interventions. The project then implemented a community theatre approach to directly orient affected communities in Bauchi state on appropriate yellow fever behaviors. The project conducted a series of 9 community theater performances in collaboration with a local drama group in six wards reaching 4,485. Following these dramas, random members of the audience were able to mention the signs and symptoms of yellow fever, what to do in case of a sudden onset of fever and where to go. Sustained behavior change at the individual and community levels have been shown to have more impact over a longer period when appealing to deep human emotions. Thus, putting communities at the center of risk communication and community engagement responses remains crucial to moving systems and people from response to prevention and preparedness.
Collaboration not competition: How a digital gaming platform helps integrate and share essential SRH resources for adolescents?
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Kavita Ayyagari, Howard Delafield International
Co-authors :
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
Researched and co-designed with Hindi-speaking girls in India, the first game of the Game of Choice, Not Chance™ initiative provides opportunities for players to role play and learn, and offers a platform for accessing sexual reproductive health (SRH) resources. Go Nisha Go™ is designed to empower girls to make relatable choices that reflect trade offs and consequences of real-world conflicts in a virtual space, while connecting them with in-game direct-to-consumer tools and resources in support of their choices.  Co-design approaches and formative research were used to not only develop the game, but at the same time, identify and broker partnerships with NGOs and private sector partners to connect access to products and services to position the game for scale up and sustainability. While the  game focuses on menstruation, fertility awareness, contraception, consent, prioritizing education/careers and delaying marriage, themes identified through co-design research with girls highlighted key behavioral insights and thematic areas. These are identity, ambition, safety, self-image, relationships, and technology access. Based on these insights/episode themes, the game has forged 18 partnerships with organizations to reach girls where they are and deliver products and services that they value.
Songs, Dramas, interviews, and Endorsements: Understanding the effective messaging formats for public health crisis communication using digital audio technology
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Fidelis Awonodomo Da-uri, Amplio Ghana
Capacity Building for Behavioural Insights: Development of UNICEF’s Global e-Learning Module
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Chelsi Campbell, Duke University And North Carolina State University
Co-authors :
Jenna McChesney
Fernanda Silva, UNICEF
Julianne Birungi , United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Lori Foster
As SBC continues to incorporate Behavioural Insights (BI) into its toolbox there is a need for training in many forms, including capacity building that is online and globally accessible. UNICEF partnered with content experts and instructional designers to develop an online, asynchronous, self-paced course targeted at introducing BI. The training was designed to help learners: 1) describe BI as a tool for behavioural change, 2) describe the ways in which BI can contribute to a social and behavioural change program or intervention, 3) explain BI methodology, 4) recall practical examples of BI in low- and middle-income settings, and 5) identify when BI is an appropriate tool to leverage versus when it is not.The project resulted in an online, open-access, three-module Behavioural Insights training. The approximately six-hour training combines video, interactive modules, and formative and summative assessments to provide an overview of BI. Using animated characters, it follows two hypothetical UNICEF colleagues through their journey of learning BI. The training emphasises that BI is just one approach to behaviour change, including how BI can be combined with other approaches such as human-centred design. The content development process focused on examples from LMIC countries, highlighting the need for more BI research globally. The feedback process generated discussion around how to balance the technical nature of BI with the practical needs of SBCC practitioners. The training will continue to develop as capacity grows and more BI evidence is generated. 
An unspoken issue: Addressing the taboo of bullying in Jordan through edutainment
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Sarah-Jean Cunningham, Magenta
Co-authors :
Charlie Booth, Magenta
Khaled Darwazah, Magenta
L’art de changer ensemble : une expérience Malienne en éducation
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Veronique Doyon, Cowater International
Outbreak READY! A digital simulation strengthening the readiness of non-governmental organizations to respond to infectious disease outbreaks.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Kathryn Bertram, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Laura Cardinal, Save The Children
Pilot of an Interactive Voice Response Service for Delivering Maternal Health Information to Expectant Fathers in Pakistan
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Sacha St-Onge Ahmad, University Of Maryland
Co-authors :
Mustafa Naseem, University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Shan Muhammad Randhawa, University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Muhammad Bilal Saleem, Purdue University
Agha Ali Raza, Information Technology University
High mobile phone ownership in Pakistan offers a unique opportunity to connect populations that otherwise would not have access to one another. We propose an Interactive Voice Response Service (IVR) to connect gynecologists to expectant fathers, a subgroup that is often the primary decision-maker at home. We developed and piloted Super Abbu (Super Dad), an IVR that delivers maternal health information in Pakistan. Its main features are: 1) a question and answer section that connects users to gynecologists and 2) a story-sharing section that allows users to share experiences with peers. Content is moderated prior to becoming public and can be shared with friends, commented on, voted on, and given open-ended feedback on by users. Findings include: 1) targeted robocalls result in high uptake and audio banner ads on existing IVRs result in high engagement and retention; 2) there is demand for maternal health information by men; 3) there is high approval of a service that delivers culturally sensitive information on reproductive health; 4) content moderators require guidelines on what questions to make public to maintain cultural appropriateness of the service; 5) content moderators require guidelines to prevent the spread of misinformation while protecting users' right to free speech. Super Abbu demonstrates that IVRs can: 1) collect data on the informational needs of marginalized populations about culturally sensitive topics and 2) deliver personalized information to hard-to-reach populations with low education levels. Limitations include limited information on users and health impacts of the service.
STRENGTH IN NUMBERS—TOGETHER WE CAN! HOW COMMUNITY WOMEN CAN TRANSLATE SELF-EFFICACY TO ACTION IN COUNTERING VIOLENT CONFLICTS AMID A PANDEMIC
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Ibukunoluwa Sanni, ARDA Development Communication Incorporated
Co-authors :
Alison Data Phido, ARDA Development Communication Incorporated
Chinwe Nelly Maduabum
Oluwaseun Ajiboye, ARDA Development Communication Incorporated
Priscilla Fiberesima, ARDA Development Communication Incorporated
Due to the rise in violent conflicts in Northern Nigeria, there has been a call for innovative initiatives to promote messages to counter narratives peddled by extremist groups. In achieving this, it became clear that the goal should not be to just end the conflicts but also build and sustain peaceful, tolerant and resilient societies where everyone irrespective of gender and status can thrive. Although women are often most affected by conflicts, peace processes in Nigeria have hitherto been largely dominated by men due to patriarchal cultural beliefs and gender inequalities. However, there is substantive evidence that indicates that women participation in peace processes are usually more successful as they are often focused on economic development and justice which are important elements for sustained peace.To address the United Nations SDG goals (5 and 16) and women's involvement in CVE, our task as the communication partners of the USAID-funded Community Initiatives to Promote Peace project with Mercy Corps as lead partner and other local partners, was to adapt our radio programs during the peak of the  pandemic to address vaccine hesitancy and ensure women's participation in peace-Building. Using a combination of the Entertaining-Education (EE) format of Radio drama and the qualitative research method of Focus Group Discussions (FGD), Women listeners clubs were created in audience communities with the aim of bridging the gap between knowledge and action on countering violent conflicts in Northern Nigeria. Women's agency and their participation in peace-building efforts are amplified in project communities.
Amplifying Traditional Media through Mobile Digital Platform. The Albishirin Ku! Story.
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Chizoba Onyechi, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Idi Nasiru, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Justin DeNormandie, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Nii Lante Heward-Mills, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Delivering social and behavior change (SBC) content through a combination of traditional media and mobile platforms can increase the reach of messages among target audiences. Breakthrough ACTION-Nigeria, a USAID-funded project, developed an integrated mass media campaign titled Albishirin Ku! (Glad Tidings! in Hausa) that uses radio and mobile channels. The campaign concept was developed to address 17 priority behaviors, including MNCH+N, FP and malaria, and social objectives, including gender. The radio program uses an innovative approach to storytelling. Monday through Friday, a new 5-minute segment is aired throughout the day. The story unfolds through a different lens: a dramatic cliffhanger, religious, family influencer, health provider, and a social perspective. The full 25-minute episode is aired over the weekends. These changing perspectives allow the radio program to tell an engaging story and appeal to diverse beneficiary populations and influencers while addressing the project's objectives.The Albishirin Ku! radio drama and spots was launched in August 2019 using a combination of traditional and mobile platforms. The radio program is available on a toll-free mobile platform that allows callers to listen. The project analyses the content callers' access, the time they spend listening, and demographic information provided by the callers. The analysis allows the program to understand callers' engagement and level of interest in the program. Since the launch of the Albishirin Ku! Radio drama on the mobile platform, it has received over 2,368,873 calls from 565,912 unique callers who have spent over 9,647,601 minutes of call time.
The Entertaining Way to Behavioral Change: Fighting HIV and GBV with MTV
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Victor Orozco-Olvera, World Bank
Co-authors :
Abhijit Banerjee
Eliana La Ferrara, Bocconi University
The Loop Trail Quest: Game-based learning for One Health holds promise for additional public health behavior change applications
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
Game-based learning (GBL) is a well-researched and dynamic mechanism for instruction, characterized by elements of engagement, narratives, and personalized feedback that enhance learning. Studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of GBL for public health applications. This study was both a messaging treatment employing GBL through a simulation and a data collection tool. Results revealed that participants in the simulation and video treatment groups were significantly more likely to shift attitudes on One Health-related themes when compared to participants in the Booklet treatment (p<0.05). The designers and producers of this game drew reference from this simulation entitled: The Loop Trail Quest. In this low fidelity game, players are presented with competing choices and asked to make a decision, then indicate from a drop down list why they made that choice. The simulation then animates how their seemingly benign behavior puts in motion the triggers that cause zoonotic disease. The design of a choice-based simulation to understand decision-making and the findings of this study were the inspiration of the Game of Choice, Not Chance game for girls in India; a story-driven mobile game with direct links to reproductive health information. Similarly, in Go Nisha Go, the players make decisions and the story branches based on her decisions. Tools and features in the game guides players, providing them with insights and feedback about their in-game choices and actions, with the aim of increasing their decision-making capacity in real-life situations.
Creating a Regional Mini-Series to Promote Attitudes and Behaviors Related to Zoonotic Diseases in Francophone West Africa
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Cori Fordham, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Co-authors :
Mohamed Sangare, Johns Hopkins Center For Communication Programs (CCP)
Using interactive educational audio mobile phone games to empower adolescent girls in Uganda
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Josie Gallo, Peripheral Vision International
Co-authors :
Rachael Alldian, Viamo
Jenna Grzeslo, BRAC USA
This project is a collaboration between BRAC, Peripheral Vision International (PVI), and Viamo; to adapt the Empowerment and Livelihoods for Adolescents (ELA) program to a digital and remote learning model. The ELA program works with adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), many of whom are out of school, to provide them with mentorship, skills, and training in areas such as financial literacy, savings, health, goal-setting and leadership. Material from the ELA curriculum has been selected to be adapted as interactive teaching content delivered in spoken English and local languages, available via basic mobile phones. The platform, initially delivered through a pilot phase, will be made available on Uganda's Airtel-Viamo 3-2-1 service which is free to dial, available in multiple languages, and accessible on any mobile phone across the country. The selected content includes educational games on health - puberty, menstruation, HIV - as well as finances, wellbeing, and the future. The content is brought to life through a series of fictional characters and interactive storylines that the caller can journey through, responding to scenarios and quizzes to complete the games. By scaling up the ELA program through this method, it will enable BRAC to increase its reach.
How the COVID-19 shutdown revealed the effectiveness of a Nigerian educational media program
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Dina Borzekowski, University Of Maryland
Co-authors :
Hadiza Babayaro
A team of researchers were investigating the impact of a Nigerian adaptation of Akili and Me when the COVID-19 pandemic struck. Schools shut down, altering the study's quasi-experimental intervention design. Post-intervention and school reopening, researchers recontacted 363 children (mean age= 5.1yrs, SD= 1.1 yrs) who had provided data at baseline. The interruption allowed exploration of the research question "if and how did home-based exposure to Akili and Me affect educational outcomes among Nigerian children?" The post-intervention analyses revealed that during the school shutdown, children accessed Akili and Me through broadcast, radio, the Internet, and social media. Across viewing groups and including the control group, children became familiar with the program's characters. While the team observed no differences associated with the prior and different intervention groups, those children who could name more Akili and Me characters performed significantly better on the outcomes of literacy, numeracy, shape, socio-emotional development. This study offers promising evidence that when collaborating sectors (i.e., governments, media producers, educators, and researchers) come together during a time of urgency and promote the production, distribution, and utilization of educational media, young children can gain skills and knowledge even during a time of crises.
Creative and Artistic Approach to Peace Building and Reconciliation in Mali
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Julia Bello-Bravo, Purdue University
Co-authors :
Anne Lutomia, Purdue University
John Medendorp, Purdue University
Barry Pittendrigh, Purdue University
Despite the worldwide efforts to bring peace and justice to some countries using social, economic, and creative approaches, conflict continues to spread, affecting marginal communities. Using creative arts in peacebuilding could bring stable transformation to affected communities. Digital opportunities to bring affected partners into the space of creative arts to express their traumatic experiences could help to start the conversation on reconciliation. This project was a collaboration between the Malian Commission for Truth, Justice and Reconciliation (CVJR), students from the Malian University Institute for Technology (IUT), the Michigan State University Residential College in the Arts and Humanities (RCAH), and the program Scientific Animation Without Borders (SAWBO) at Purdue University. It explored the creation of animation on topics of peace that are recurrent in any conflict and translated into local languages to engage local communities into peacebuilding dialogues. We created the first animation based on a picture book with textiles fabric and traditional approaches to negotiation from Mali. The other animations, Forgiveness and Kidnapping, were created with the voice of students, teachers, local artists, and local community activists. With this creative approach to peace, we attempt to bring a transformative collaboration to accomplish shared objectives. We explained the process and outcomes of creating this educational peace approach. The project has been ongoing since 2019 and, since then, we have been participating in workshops via Zoom. Team leaders have tested the videos in towns and villages in Mali with the assistance of students from IUT.
Contributing to an Integrated Early Childhood Development, Nutrition and WASH Porgramme through Social and Behaviour Change in Rwanda
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Maksim Fazlitdinov, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Early childhood development (ECD) is a national priority in Rwanda. The country faces a stunting rate of 38 per cent among children under five, with 37 per cent of those aged 36-59 months developmentally off-track in literacy-numeracy, physical, social-emotional, and learning domains. UNICEF and partners designed and implemented a comprehensive programme around integrated ECD, nutrition, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), to respond to this context. The programme aimed to increase effective and responsive care for young children by primary caregivers, extended family, and communities. The social and behaviour change (SBC) strategy leveraged platforms such as the Itetero radio and TV drama to broadcast relevant content and community platforms like monthly community work days with support from a trained cadre of community health volunteers. Partnerships were established with religious networks, including churches and mosques, as well as the tea growing sector. Theatre for Development, sermons in churches and mosques, and dialogues with caregivers and community influencers were also utilised to reach wider audience. A 7 per cent increase in access to ECD services was recorded in the second year of the intervention, from 13 per cent baseline to 20 per cent. A 13 per cent increase in the number of primary caregivers who promote early learning and 6 per cent increase in caregivers who believe physical punishment is necessary was realised. Buy-in from the highest level of government, as well as community influencers was key to tackling complex barriers related to integrated interventions.
Can a game break down barriers to boys\' engagement with ASRH and become allies with girls?
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Namita Brij Mohandas, Howard Delafield International
Susan Howard, Howard Delafield International
The USAID-funded Game of Choice, Not Chance™ (GOC) initiative develops mobile games  supporting youth to become active decision-makers in their lives. The first game was designed with and for girls (15-19), in Bihar, Delhi and Rajasthan. The platform provides an entertaining private space for learning through interactive role-play and connects girls to information,  products, services, equipping them to confidently shape their futures. Building a complementary game for boys/young men will create collective action, allyship, and impact for adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH).Through Boy Game Discovery Research, we gathered information and insights on boys' lives, relationships, aspirations, gaming behaviors, ASRH needs, and challenges. Primary objectives related to boys' self and social spheres: Self - understand game-relevant dimensions of boys' lives: phone use/engagement, media, game usage; aspirations, conflicts, gender ideologies; ASRH-related behaviors/perceptions. Social - explore semiotic/social/normative contexts of boys' understanding of ASRH, gender, and masculinity. Using multi-method research with boys (15-22), family members, and experts, we asked foundational questions: How does boys' social, spatial, and cultural environment shape gender ideologies, ASRH attitudes, outcomes? What motivations, aspirations, tensions exist for boys? How do boys engage with phones, media, content, and data? What are gaming behaviors, practices, and preferences?Resulting insights informing game design/development: boys' aspirations, trusted channels for information, relationships with girls, peers, family. Scenario-based, projected representations were built on broad themes, ASRH experiences mapped, and case studies developed. Identifying relevant values/multiple traits enabled building individual personas that will become relatable characters in game design.
The Case for Utu: Co-Creating Educational Cartoons to Promote Social Responsibility and Mobilisation through Character Strengths and Indigenous Pan-African Values
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Cliodhna Ryan
Numerous studies have shown that socioemotional and life skills are equally important as academic measures to learning and life outcomes. Significant efforts have been made on socioemotional learning, however, the majority of this work has been centred on Western concepts and formal delivery models. Over the past three years, a Pan-African edutainment organisation has been utilising a developmental science approach to incorporate life skills and socioemotional development into diverse learning content. The organisation then broadcasted the content to more than 16 million households across Africa. Studies show that the edutainment programme was successful in teaching 'Utu' - a character strength, or 'shared humanity' rooted in East African indigenous teachings. It also impacted children's practice of Utu. The edutainment programme motivated children towards social mobilisation in the form of 'Utu Clubs' after watching. Three different models were piloted - encouragement through live-action-videos, in-person outreach by staff and encouragement through digital channels. While the three models each had their own merits and challenges, a combined approach is most successful to enable kids to take learning offline and practise Utu. While participating in the clubs, children reported an increased sense of unity, cooperation and solidarity. Increased social responsibility was also reported, along with an increase in gender equity in the groups. Third-party researchers also discovered statistical significance in Utu's association with reduced stigma and greater resilience. The results of this project show the exciting potential of quality, localised edutainment to catalyse wide-spread character development, social mobilisation and socioemotional learning.
Empowering Indigenous Emerging Voices: Exploring the potential for Traditional and 360 Immersive Storytelling to bridge the Digital Divide in Amazonian Ecuador
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Megan Westervelt, Ohio University & InitialEyes (nonprofit)
Saumya Pant, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA
Co-authors :
Jorge Castillo, OHIO UNIVERSITY/ Tropical Herping
Who decides? Influencing decision making processes on child marriage in rural Pakistan
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Presented by :
Katinka Moonen, Oxfam Novib
Raffat Shuja, Bedari Pakistan
Co-authors :
Karlijn Morsink, Utrecht University
The More than Brides Alliance (MTBA) implemented a five-year project to end child marriages in rural communities in Pakistan. Pakistan is a context with high rates of child marriage: even among girls currently aged 20-24, 21% were married as a child (UNICEF, 2019). Child marriages are embedded in religion, culture and social norms. MTBA  has used mobile cinema to reach the heartland; small villages across conservative rural areas where child marriages are most prevalent. Cinema sessions- women/men only and mixed- were hosted by the community and  NGO's Bedari and Indus Resource Center. They focused on the costs of child marriage in terms of health of   married girls and future children,   quality of  marriage and low education levels. They demonstrated pathways to discuss delaying marriage and refusing spouses. Filmscripts were locally developed and based on qualitative research on beliefs and norms around child marriage. 6000 people were reached in two districts of Sindh and Punjab respectively. The impact of these interventions has been evaluated through a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) by a research team from the Center for Economic Research in Pakistan, University of Oxford and VU University. Results show significant reductions in child marriage in participating households when men are treated, while there are no impacts on marriage in participating households when women are treated, or men and women are treated jointly. In these latter two interventions, however, there are significant changes in child marriages at village level, and that does not happen when men only are treated.  
03:30PM - 04:15PM
Designated Break Areas (each level)
Tea Break
Format : Tea Break
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 5
Strengthening Community Voices
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Infectious disease/COVID | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Ombretta Baggio, International Federation Of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Lilian Kamanzi, Amref Health Africa
Moderators
Jitendra Awale, CGPP India, World Vision US
Achieving rapid behavior change in the midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic - Uganda
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Lilian Kamanzi, Amref Health Africa
Brenda Asiko
The pandemic has caused a heavy death toll, disrupted livelihoods and has rolled back economic progress like no other public health emergency in the past 100 years. In Uganda over 160,000 COVID-19 cases and 3,500 deaths have been registered so far. The high adherence to the known public health and social measures that were embraced by communities was a game changer in our COVID-19 response as a country Between June and December 2021, Amref Health Africa’s COVID-19 response was structured around three pillars: Preventing Transmission, Preventing Death, and Preventing Social Harm. For each of the pillars, Amref’s approach was reinforced by our trademark commitment to community engagement and awareness-raising, delivered through an extensive network of village health teams (VHTs). Through strategic partnerships and an ambitious communication and thought leadership agenda, Amref continued to provide leadership and strategic policy direction at global, continental, regional, national, district and village levels on matters related to COVID-19. We left no one behind.This is a snapshot of the key interventions implemented towards continuation of Amref’s COVID-19 response which began in mid-March 2020, initially targeting 10 countries in East, Southern, and West Africa. Since then, at least 30 COVID-19 projects have been rolled out, and an additional 45 existing projects realigned to incorporate COVID-19 into their routine implementation plans. Our COVID-19 response now spans 30 countries. The central focus of this work is on raising awareness to help reduce the number of new infections, border surveillance interventions, training of health workers to strengthen their capacity to respond to COVID-19, and WASH interventions, as well as support to the deployment of COVID-19 vaccines through awareness creation and community outreach, among others. In Uganda the Covid-19 Pandemic amplified the challenges in our country and demonstrated the importance of strong and effective partnerships in response efforts. As such Amref Health Africa in Uganda expeditiously re-programmed its activities in order to support and contribute towards flipping the script against COVID-19. Aligning all our work towards the new normal.
From words to action: community feedback in outbreaks response
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Ombretta Baggio, International Federation Of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)
The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed the world to a tipping point, but it has also reminded us that epidemics are all about people. From community leaders in Southern Africa, to religious leaders in Afghanistan and women's groups in Yemen, all defining and adapting COVID-19 protective measures to their needs; there is ample evidence that communities are central to preventing and containing epidemics.[1]The time to take community-led action to the next level is now. Based on our collective experience of preparing and responding to outbreaks worldwide,  this would require that our interventions and measures are inclusive, agile and receptive to change which is continuously grounded in regularly collected community data. Community partnerships need joint accountability and so must be oriented by evidence.  It helps us to monitor our work and foster the community trust, civil responsibility and public solidarity needed for pandemic readiness.  We advocate that social and behavioural data and community perspectives drive our work and community-centred action becomes the norm.Community feedback is an essential form of evidence in outbreaks, and should be included in decision-making processes.[2][1] Loewenson et al. 2020 Beyond command and control: A rapid review of meaningful community-engaged responses to COVID-19. Glob Pub Health https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33734007/ [2] McKay G, Baggio O, Camara CA, et al' The response is like a big ship': community feedback as a case study of evidence uptake and use in the 2018–2020 Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the CongoBMJ Global Health 2022;7:e005971https://gh.bmj.com/content/7/2/e005971.citation-tools
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Reda 1
Taking Back Power
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Entertainment Education | Gender | Inclusion
Speakers
Kaleem Khan, Magenta
Taroub Faramand, WI-HER, LLC
Moderators
Melissa Cockroft, International Planned Parenthood Federation - Africa Region
An unspoken issue: Addressing the taboo of bullying in Jordan through edutainment
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Kaleem Khan, Magenta
Co-authors :
Charlie Booth, Magenta
Laurelle May, Magenta
MAGENTA partnered with UNICEF Jordan to develop an Edutainment drama series to reduce bullying among adolescents ages 13-16 in schools in Jordan. To create a series that was resonant, entertaining and impactful, MAGENTA conducted formative research in the form of a literature review, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. During the research MAGENTA identified the main psychological, sociological and environmental drivers of bullying in Jordan and built a nuanced understanding of how bullying manifests in Jordan specifically. Script writers were directly exposed to the target audience during this process. The formative research served as the basis of the creative development of content that was resonant, culturally sensitive and accurately reflected the manifestations of bullying in Jordan. In order to reflect the media consumption habits of adolescents in Jordan, MAGENTA designed a mobile-forward drama series designed to be disseminated online and on social media.   The series, 'The Neighborhood,' is comprised of 12 short-form episodes, set in an average middle class neighborhood in Jordan, features Jordanian children as actors and utilizes an integrated method of both scripted and unscripted content, to directly reflect the language, attitudes and lives of children in Jordan. Along with the Edutainment series, MAGENTA developed training materials for teachers in Jordan to use to facilitate reflective discussions about bullying with students, promote positive behaviours and empower teachers to address bullying directly. 
Addressing Gender, Youth and Social Inclusion in Social and Behavior Change Programs to Increase Locally Led Improved Health Outcomes
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Taroub Faramand, WI-HER, LLC
Within social and behavior change (SBC) development projects; gender, youth, and social inclusion (GYSI) play a central role in program impact. GYSI initiatives are challenging due to gender norms that dictate individuals' roles in family, community, and society. GYSI health and social issues, such as access to, control over, and benefits from resources, opportunities, and services; gender-based violence; females' lack of decision-making ability; and healthcare-seeking behavior; are all challenges that influence individuals'  ability to adopt healthy behaviors, access health services, adhere to healthcare treatment and maintain healthy lives. GYSI issues and social norms impact all people in different ways and are influenced by local context of the implementing country and the clinical area in which the program is aiming to influence.WI-HER's President and Founder, Dr. Taroub Harb Faramand, designed the iDARE methodology to bridge the gap between implementation and behavior change sciences, with GYSI at its core, drive locally designed solutions, and ensure collective voices of target populations are integrated from design forward. iDARE builds capacity of local governments, facilities, and communities to devise and implement local solutions; critically, these solutions can then be adapted to any context. In the case of Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda, this included national, regional, and local government stakeholders, health workers, community health workers, and community influencers. While the goals, health areas, and contexts largely varied, the core application of iDARE, which focuses on the process, remained the same throughout the countries with adaptations made for programmatic and contextual differences.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Reda 1
Reimagining Community Volunteers
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Democracy, Conflict, and Governance | Inclusion | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Adaora Uzoh-Ntiwunka, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria.
Mohamed Mhmmoudi, CorpsAfrica
Moderators
Aditya Jagati, Busara Center For Behavioral Economics, Inc.
CorpsAfrica: Challenging the Notion of the Outside Savior
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Mohamed Mhmmoudi, CorpsAfrica
Co-authors :
Garrett Mason, CorpsAfrica
CorpsAfrica models sustainable, community-led development through year-long opportunities for motivated, college-educated Africans to serve in a rural community in their own country (or another African country) and facilitate a locally-identified project. The CorpsAfrica model empowers local communities to lead their own development, inspires African youth to become changemakers, and promotes African philanthropy and collaboration within the social sector. Evidence shows that this model works. 98% of CorpsAfrica Volunteers said their communities supported the projects, with 94% also saying the community has complete ownership over the project. 100% of CorpsAfrica Volunteers in the past year reported understanding their country of service better after serving. Moreover, in the past year CorpsAfrica has collaborated with nearly 200 development stakeholders in facilitating projects and training CorpsAfrica Volunteers.The CorpsAfrica model relies on ambitious and educated youth, an asset that exists in every country. Each CorpsAfrica office is locally-staffed with autonomy over their program, partnership, and fundraising strategies. One constant across all countries is the empathy and humility Volunteers develop by learning about and living in their assigned communities. Volunteers are trained in Human-Centered Design and Asset-Based Community Development to facilitate conversations that reveal local capacities, assets, and interests. They use these conversations to identify a project that comes from the community. This participatory approach challenges the notion that the outside savior knows best. By engaging community members, African youth and African philanthropists, CorpsAfrica mobilizes Africa's best assets in directing genuine, self-directed social change.
A Task-shifting and community mobilization approach to increase acceptance, demand and uptake for DMPA-SC/ Self-injection in Nigeria.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Adaora Uzoh-Ntiwunka, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria.
Co-authors :
Babafunke Fagbemi, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Adenike Ayodele, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
John Ejeh, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Itunu Dave-Agbola, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria
Atinuke Uchiduno, Centre For Communication And Social Impact, Nigeria
Olajumoke Olarewaju, Centre For Communication And Social Impact
Over the years, demand generation efforts have increased awareness about family planning in Nigeria but sadly, uptake has been remarkably low due to poor access to family planning (FP) services. This low uptake has had drastic consequences ranging from botched abortions to maternal mortality and poor socioeconomic conditions (NDHS 2018).The use of injectable contraceptives to increase access to family planning services has been documented in countries like Madagascar, Ghana, and Uganda. This approach significantly increased contraceptive uptake in these countries and motivated several other countries including Nigeria to adapt it. Owing to its success rate, the Nigeria National Council on Health (NCH) approved a policy to allow community health extension workers (CHEWs) to provide injectable contraceptives in communities, to scale-up contraceptive uptake in Nigeria. This approach tailored towards audience-centeredness was employed on the BMGF and CIFF co-funded Resilient and accelerated scale-up of DMPA-SC/Self-Injection in Nigeria (RASuDiN) Project.RASuDiN aims to expand FP method choice and empower women by supporting the roll-out of Depo-Medroxy Progesterone Acetate Sub-Cutaneous (DMPA-SC) integration and community-initiated Self-Injection (SI) in 10 states in Nigeria. Multi-channel demand generation approaches such as social mobilization, radio campaigns, and social media campaigns were employed over a three-year period. CHEWs trained to provide DMPA-SC and other FP services were paired with demand generation teams for the provision of community-based FP services. This approach increased acceptance, dispelled myths, clarified misconceptions, and improved uptake of DMPA-SC self-injection. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 1
Novel Approaches to Addressing GBV
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Gender | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Maithreyi Ravikumar, Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT)
Tribeni Pegu
Moderators
Ebele Achor, PACT
Decoding Bystander Behaviour: From Looking Away to Intervening Smart
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Tribeni Pegu
According to a survey in 2019, India ranked highest in the list of dangerous countries for women. During the 2020 COVID-19 lockdown, domestic violence cases in India reached a 10-year high.Gender-based violence is so deep rooted in our society that looking away from violence is acceptable. This idea even becomes stronger through our work in the communities. Those who witnessed violence chose to look away especially in public spaces as opposed to taking action. Most people seem to consider VAW as "not my problem" and hence the tendency to ignore and look the other way is high.  Breakthrough's 360 degree campaign, Dakhal Do (which literally means 'Intervene') aims to shift the norm of bystander apathy towards a world where looking away is unacceptable. Where, the next time there are any signs of violence in a home or a woman is being harassed in public space, someone steps forward and says, 'Enough!'.In order to promote positive bystander action, it is essential that we better understand the factors which motivate bystanders to intervene or prevent them from doing so. This led us to undertaking a research study titled, "Decoding Bystander Behaviour: Actions To Address Violence Against Women" in 2020-2021.It is this research that sheds light on how there can be smarter and subtle ways of intervention vis-a-vis the risk of confronting the perpetrator one-on-one especially in a violent situation.
Girl-Leads-Girl: Scaling up strategies to prevent Gender Based Violence
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Maithreyi Ravikumar, Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT)
Co-authors :
Avinash Kastura, KHPT
Anshu Kumari, KHPT
Satyanarayana Ramanaik
According to recent estimates  nearly 1 in 3 women, aged 15 years and older, face physical or sexual violence in their lifetime globally. Adolescent girls, from the low and middle-income countries, are particularly vulnerable to gendered violence, which affects their access to education, health and mental health, mobility, and even renders them victims of child marriage. Studies show that experiences of violence during the formative years contributes to the internalization of violence among young girls, who continue to be the victims of violence throughout their lives.  In this talk we discuss an innovative campaign that was conducted in the southern state of Karnataka, India to address gender-based violence (GBV). Titled 'Freedom from Violence', the campaign was led by adolescent girls who directly partnered with the state government to conduct an online training program for over 16000 schools and 600,000 adolescents across the state. Using multiple formats and sharing their own experiences of learning about violence and countering it at home, Pavithra, Rubiya and Anjali, from rural Koppal in Karnataka, taught their peers (both boys and girls) about resisting gendered discrimination, the importance of self-esteem and saying 'no' to prevent violence. In this talk, the girls will share their journey of conducting the campaign. We discuss with them the importance and effectiveness of conducting such a campaign, and the impact it had on their peers. We reflect on the potential of the peer-learning approach through social media as a means to scale of effective solutions to GBV.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 2
Encouraging Play
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Children | Digital/Mobile | Social Media
Speakers
Emma Mohamad, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Katherine Morse, Nal'ibali
Moderators
Anish Shrestha, Plan International Nepal
Fun Theory and Social Media as a Potential Community Engagement Tool for Global SBCC in Health
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Emma Mohamad, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Co-authors :
Arina Anis Azlan, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Shamsiah Abd Kadir, UKM X UNICEF C4D Centre In Health, Centre For Research In Media And Communication, Faculty Of Social Sciences And Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Theories in social behavior change communications have examined many cognitive and affective aspects of human beings to encourage people to adopt positive health behaviors. Antecedents such as attitudes, social norms and self efficacy are some of the common factors in these theories that were proven to motivate human intentions. A more recent development in behavior theories such as the nudge theory and behavioral insight techniques have also shown some potential to influence social change at a larger scale. However, these theories have not yet tapped on one of the most potential drivers of motivation, fun. Fun theory has been used to motivate people to do all sorts of 'boring' behaviors. We have seen fun theory being introduce in building designs such as the piano stairs in Vienna to motivate people to use stairs instead of an escalator. However we have yet to take advantage and maximize the potential of fun theory in SBCC on social media. This talk will unpack the potential of social media to engage people globally to adopt healthy behaviors by introducing fun theory to its application. 
Harnessing the Power of Families to Change Literacy Outcomes for Children Living in Poverty.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Katherine Morse, Nal'ibali
The Nal'ibali Trust runs a national reading-for-enjoyment campaign in South Africa. The campaign promotes reading and storytelling to children through a strong media presence reaching over 12 million, annually. The campaign targets communities who were disadvantaged under apartheid and still suffer with the poorest access to quality schooling. Reading-for-enjoyment is a critical part of whole language development. In South Africa, 80% of Grade 4s cannot read for meaning. Traditionally we have relied on the school system to develop literacy. However, during Covid-19 restricted school access, the role of parents as educators was elevated. Nal'ibali began to look for ways to draw families into the literacy eco-system to strengthen literacy development. We found that our national literacy event – World Read Aloud Day – was an effective introduction to reading and storytelling behaviours leading to 67% of family participants increasing their family reading and storytelling activities. In 2022 we pivoted our campaign more specifically towards families. We invited them to assist us in developing motivating and culturally relevant messaging and advise on distribution. Our 2022 World Read Aloud Day advertising was family focused with weekly follow-up messages and support to build daily family reading habits. 63% of families who participated in 2022, reported that since participating they were reading or storytelling on most days, compared to only 6% of families in the general population. The Nal'ibali National Campaign presents a replicable and scalable model of reaching impoverished families and motivating behaviour change. 
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 3
Families Connected with Dignity
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Children | Entertainment Education | Gender | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Katherine Morse, Nal'ibali
Harriet Perlman , Heartlines
Saumya Pant, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA
Moderators
Gacheri Ndumba Mbogori, Well Made Strategy
Centering the Narratives of Resistance and Transformation of Surrogate Mothers: An Exploration of Health Disparities During the Pandemic in India
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Saumya Pant, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA
Co-authors :
Lopamudra Goswami, Griffith University
In India, surrogacy has transformed itself from a marginalized and socially unacceptable procedure into a multimillion-dollar industry positioning India as a global surrogacy-capital. While surrogacy raises profound questions about our understanding of motherhood and the making of family, it also denaturalizes reproduction and gives agency to women who are surviving on the margins of deprivation and destitution.The impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic have been catastrophic internationally, with alarming rates of cases and deaths, as well as travel bans and countrywide lockdowns. While many industries experienced the negative effects of Covid-19, international surrogacy faced enormous challenges resulting from the pandemic. Due to multiple lockdowns in India, there were serious concerns about surrogate mothers' access to basic services including health care, food, and transportation. In addition, due to the global travel ban, many intended parents were unable to access the fertility clinics and retrieving their babies from the clinics raising concerns ranging from: who should be responsible for the care of the newborn babies, what should be the role of the surrogate mothers in post-natal care of the newborn babies, and what is the responsibility of the fertility clinics and the health care providers towards the newborn babies and the surrogate mothers. This talk will foreground the voices of the surrogate mothers in India who experienced immense challenges during the pandemic and will background a discussion on the structural inequities and conditions that constitute those health experiences. 
Fathers Matter - An edutainment initiative promoting the positive and active role of men in the lives of children, in order to mitigate the risks associated with uninvolved fathers
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Harriet Perlman , Heartlines
Heartlines, The Centre for Values Promotion, is a South African-based NGO established in 2002. We aim to contribute to a more equitable, caring, cohesive, healthy and just society. Research shows that children who grow up without the active positive presence of one or more men in their lives  puts them at significant risk of being victims or perpetrators of violence including GBV, mental illness, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy and poor educational and economic outcomes . In South Africa alone, over 65% of children experience male absence. Heartlines is involved in a wide reaching campaign entitled Fathers Matter,  to highlight the important role fathers and father figures play in the lives and well being of children . This SBCC campaign consists of multiple formats including,  6 entertaining anthology films,; talk radio; a website (www.fathersmatter.org.za);  social media, print and community outreach.  This talk will focus primarily on the 6 anthology films and how the stories have been rooted in a rigorous research process out of which messages were designed and scripts crafted . I will also share insights into how the testing process impacted on the  story and characters and how the other media formats support the campaign.  An evaluation has been designed. Covid delayed implementation but we start filming in June and will be on air  later in the year.  This talk will look at how the SBCC process (including research, testing) was embedded in the creation of this powerful edutainment initiative.  
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Karam 4
Changing the landscape to change social norms
Format : Comm Talk
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Sarah Akintubuwa, USAID YPE4AH/DAI Nigeria
Boladale Akin-Kolapo, USAID YPE4AH, DAI Nigeria
Moderators
OLUCHI BASSEY, Sydani Initiative For International Development
Sex in the City: Improving Sexual Health and Sexual Health Services for Adolescents in Conservative Contexts.
04:15PM - 04:45PM
Presented by :
Boladale Akin-Kolapo, USAID YPE4AH, DAI Nigeria
Sarah Akintubuwa, USAID YPE4AH/DAI Nigeria
In conservative or traditional cultures, sexual and reproductive health, and family planning services are mostly seen to encourage promiscuity. Cultural norms often dictate that women should stay in the home, marry early, and bear multiple children. Gender-based violence can be normalised within these contexts and discussions around sexual health, female reproductive and menstrual health may be taboo. Women often are only permitted to receive care from female health workers and may experience biases from contraception providers who restrict access to birth control. These attitudes can prevent adolescents from receiving age appropriate care and sexual health education, particularly disenfranchising young girls who often marry young with no knowledge or access to family planning services. Young people's futures and the health of mothers and babies can be jeopardised without proper reproductive and sexual healthcare, and knowledge about contraception and child spacing. Clearly, improving sexual and reproductive healthcare and education in conservative contexts can improve the health of entire communities. Development implementers need to effectively navigate social, cultural, religious, and political norms whilst challenging values that impact community health. Respecting cultural differences, gaining trust, and establishing buy-in for new health initiatives requires a thoughtful, holistic approach. Attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health are systemic, thus changing behaviour requires a whole-of-society approach. We examine how to effectively design and manage holistic SBC programmes in conservative areas to change attitudes towards family planning and sexual health. 
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 1a
Enabling Communities to Define and Manage their Own Behavior Change Program
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Behavioral Economics (BE) | Inclusion | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Francis Hary SOLEMAN KONE, Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
This session gives participants practical skills for enabling communities to prioritize, manage and monitor their own behavior change actions and agenda. In a relaxed and experiential learning environment, it enables participants to reflect upon the institutional norms that impede communities from managing their own behavior change priorities and activities. Then it allows participants to familiarize themselves with some inclusive, participative, visual and tangible tools that they can use as SBCC practitioners to support communities in assuming that management themselves. The workshop is facilitated by the CRS Madagascar SBCC team, who have won two important awards for this work.Participants will learn to use proven techniques for facilitating community SBCC decision making. They will learn by participating in the activities as if they were community members. They will receive a short written guide to implementing the activity learned. This workshop is for anyone seeking to learn proven methods of inspiring marginalized, non-literate but resilient and resourceful communities to be key actors in their own behavior change. It is for anyone frustrated that the prevalent rhetoric about 'inclusive' approaches is not consistently applied in the field. It is for anyone who wants to learn some practical activities that can redress imbalances of power and influence in the management of SBCC programs.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 1c
Bridging the Divide: Social Norms Research and Intervention
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Research
Speakers
Rebecka Lundgren, University Of California San Diego, ExpandNet Secretariat
Betsy Costenbader, FHI360
Suniti Neogy, CARE
Suruchi Sood, Drexel University
Moderators
Rania Abuelhasan, The International Planning Parenthood Federation (IPPF)
Effective social and behavior change program design and evaluation rely heavily on understanding and targeting norms that underly harmful practices. Considering the multiplicity of social norms and their influence on behaviors, identifying and prioritizing norms as well as measuring them, requires skills, tools and approaches beyond the existing quantitative measures. This skill-building session uses an interactive experiential learning format to familiarize researchers and program practitioners with easy-to-use tools to integrate social norms theory into practice for effective social and behavioral change interventions. This session will start with an introduction to social norms, with respect to their influence on behaviors in different contexts, and then move into group exercises where participants apply several participatory tools to identify norms related to selected outcomes, prioritize them through engagement with the community and then, use the social norms data generated, to identify opportunities for interventions to foster effective and sustainable social norms change. This will be done using real, multi-sector project case studies and evaluation data to help participants apply this approach to different stages of the project life cycle. The plenary, following the group work, will focus on laying out the steps involved in using information gathered on social norms to design effective interventions and linking participants to additional resources.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 2a
Reaching Your Audiences to Change Behavior: Developing and Implementing an Effective Social Media Strategy
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Digital/Mobile | Research | Social Media
Speakers
Danielle Fortin, JSI
Public health experts recognize health communication as vital to public health programs. Health communication enhances the program's ability to promote and improve the health of individuals, communities, and policy. Social media platforms are a powerful tool in advancing public health work, however, it can often feel difficult for public health organizations to get started, especially those without dedicated communication staff. In this hands-on workshop designed for program staff (even SBC and communications specialists), participants will begin the process of developing a social media strategy to improve program and organization outreach. Participants will learn how to increase their effectiveness by building a communication plan. Using the POST (People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology) method, participants will develop the framework of their communications plan, including a strategy for maintaining the plan and measuring effectiveness. Participants will learn how to identify and articulate their project or organization's priority audiences and the unique qualities and needs of each. We will also discuss the basics of current social media platforms, including Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and WhatsApp, their uses, advantages, differences, and limitations, and will also explore how to tailor messaging for the audiences they're trying to reach through social media. The workshop will close with a focus on applying measurement strategies to the skills learned so that participants will be able to identify key metrics and apply them to evaluate the reach and effectiveness of their social media strategies. 
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Fes 2c
Co-Creating Change with Youth
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Behavioral Economics (BE) | Digital/Mobile
Speakers
Tomas Jensen, Rain Barrel Communications
In the digital age, communication is interactive, participatory, unpredictable, co-created, and at times full of misinformation. What exactly are the implications of this to the field of social and behaviour change? Can we learn anything from exploring co-creation of change together with youth in the digital space - to become more relevant and impactful as facilitators of change - online and offline?
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Reda 4
Adapting High-Quality Illustrations from the IYCF Digital Image Bank—No Art Skills Necessary!
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Digital/Mobile | Nutrition
Speakers
Peggy Koniz-Booher, John Snow, Inc (JSI)
Meghan Anson, USAID
Laura Itzkowitz, USAID
Andrew Cunningham, USAID Advancing Nutrition
High-quality images are an essential component of SBC communication. However, limited time and funds often create programmatic barriers to developing these high-quality visual images. When we siphon our carefully crafted key messages through hastily developed images, we do a disservice to our work and our intended audiences. The UNICEF/USAID Advancing Nutrition Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Digital Image Bank aims to fill this gap in SBC communication with a set of resources for accessing, adapting, and developing high-quality images for nutrition. Images on the IYCF Digital Image Bank are in files that are incredibly information-rich and primed for adaptation. While thousands have used the IYCF Digital Image Bank, user feedback indicates that adaptation of images is still low. This session aims to show participants the possibilities of using these fully featured images for IYCF and nutrition programming. Session participants will be led through a series of tutorials exploring images from the IYCF Digital Image Bank and make light revisions. No artistic experience necessary! The tutorials will give participants a peek into the possibilities of adapting IYCF Digital Image Bank image files for use in your program's local context. Armed with the IYCF Digital Image Bank, and the knowledge from this session, you will be ready to collaborate with digital artists for high-quality SBC visual communication.Please bring your laptop to this session, as you will need it to follow along with the tutorial exercises during this session. This session does not require graphic design experience!
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Reda 5
Responsible Digital Solutions for SBCC: a Roadmap for Sustainable, Successful Implementation and Scale
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Digital/Mobile | Research
Speakers
Christopher Brooks, UNICEF
Laurie Markle, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
You've got a great idea to implement your programme using an app, a website, or SMS campaign and every private sector technology partner is offering their support. How do you know if it will work? Which digital tool is right? Will it be sustainable? Welcome to world of digital development! Join two ICT4D experts to gain practical, field-focused knowledge about responsible, successful implementation of digital tools at scale. Participants will learn about the stages of implementing digital products and access real-world scenarios to move through each stage. Leave with a comprehensive understanding of the Principles for Digital Development, the phases of implementation, and common pitfalls to avoid. Gain access to assessment tools and resources to guide the kick-off of your innovation through this interactive, scenario-based learning experience.
04:15PM - 06:15PM
Bahia (Mogador)
Strategies for Evaluating Human-centered Design: Methods, Cross-disciplinary Collaboration and Data Use
Format : Skills Building Workshop
Track : Human-Centered Design (HCD) | Research
Speakers
Stefanie Wallach, Itad
Meghan Cutherell, . Population Services International
Lydia Murithi, Pathfinder International
Human-centered design (HCD) has increasingly been recognized as a valuable tool to tackle the complex challenges that the global health community faces and to address community needs by facilitating faster innovation, better collaboration, more effective scale, and elevating the voice and agency of vulnerable groups. Yet, traditional evaluation approaches are often not well suited to capture the value of HCD when applied in public health programming or to assess the outcomes of programs that are continuously adapting and improving. As a result, these traditional evaluation approaches need to be re-conceptualized. There is a growing body of evidence and practice from HCD programs with evaluation components that can be shared to support the crafting of new,innovative approaches to evaluation moving forward and for assessing the influence of HCD on behavior change. Additionally, it is important for stakeholders from across the public health community of practice - implementers, funders, evaluators, and designers - to align on realistic expectations for the evaluation of HCD approaches. This workshop will offer participants up-to-date learning and new skills related to framing a monitoring, evaluation and learning (MEL) strategy for interventions that apply HCD. It will address the importance of understanding the anticipated influence and value of HCD in health programming, the need to balance expectations when applying measurement approaches (impact v learning and adaptation);and the critical nature of partnering and cross-disciplinary team communication practices to optimize the application of HCD and its link to program outcomes.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Reda 2
Working at Scale Whilst Leaving No One Behind: Integrating Above and Below the Line SBCC Approaches within the WISH2ACTION Consortium
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Adolescents/Youth | Inclusion | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) | Vulnerable Groups
Speakers
Melissa Cockroft, International Planned Parenthood Federation - Africa Region
Richard Ryaganda, Uzazi Na Malezi Bora Tanzania (UMATI)
Annette Naguudi, Reproductive Health Uganda
Wanjiru Mathenge, IPPF
ANZOA FORTUNATE, Humanity&Inclusion
Moses Okochi Wafula, Reproductive Health Uganda
Ssanyu Kalibbala, Development Media International Uganda
Working at Scale Whilst Leaving No One Behind: Integrating above and below the line SBCC approaches within the WISH2ACTION consortium
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Wanjiru Mathenge, IPPF
Co-authors :
Abbie Clare, Development Media International
Matthew Lavoie, Development Media International
Chantal Kijak, Development Media International
Reaching people living in severe poverty with SRHR through adapted SBCC strategies and poverty mapping: Experiences from WISH2ACTION and Uganda
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Moses Okochi Wafula, Reproductive Health Uganda
Annette Naguudi, Reproductive Health Uganda
Wanjiru Mathenge, IPPF
Melissa Cockroft, International Planned Parenthood Federation - Africa Region
Reaching people living in poverty has become a key objective for many global health programmes and the Leave No One Behind agenda. The Women's Integrated Sexual Health 2 (W2A) Programme, funded by FCDO and led by International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has supported integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in countries across Africa and Asia. A key priority for W2A is reaching marginalized and people living in poverty with quality family planning (FP) and SRHR services. W2A utilizes client exit interviews (CEIs) to assess the extent to which the program is reaching people living in poverty, with the goal of matching the national poverty headcount. Results from the first round of CEIs showed that only 4 /14 W2A countries matched or surpassed the national poverty headcount. Community Health Workers (CHWs) were identified as key actors in influencing referrals for FP services for poor clients. Subsequently, W2A utilized geospatial maps, coupled with service delivery segmentation to refine population segmentation and identification. Multi-channel awareness and demand creation strategies were implemented. CHWs were reallocated and new ones recruited where appropriate, use of community-level public address (PA) systems was increased, and audio and video cards produced to enhance the work of the CHWs. Using W2A Uganda as an example, this presentation will show how poverty adaptations to the programme led to a significant increase in the reach of SRHR clients living in poverty in Uganda from 25% to 61% against a national headcount of 41%.
Leaving No one behind: Disability Inclusive SBCC in SRHR in South Sudan
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
ANZOA FORTUNATE, Humanity&Inclusion
Co-authors :
Jane Newnham, Humanity Inclusion
Benson Bring Alex, Humanity Inclusion
Humanity and Inclusion (HI) worked in South Sudan to reduce the significant barriers to contraceptive access faced by women and girls living with disabilities.  A combination of locally-informed radio, music, community outreach, and focus group activities were conducted to raise awareness of the reproductive rights of people living with disabilities and to increase demand generation from this group. An endline, evaluation of the WISH Program showed an increase in the level of satisfaction by persons with disabilities with the attitudes demonstrated by Health Care workers when they accessed SRHR services.  Over the course of the project, it was clear that working with Organisations of Persons with Disabilities (OPDs) was key to success, due to the crucial role they play in linking persons with disabilities with sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service providers at the facility, community level, and hard to reach areas.
Reaching Adolescent Youth with SRH information and services through Special Youth Weekend Clinics Model
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Richard Ryaganda, Uzazi Na Malezi Bora Tanzania (UMATI)
Co-authors :
Daniel Kirhima, UMATI
UMATI under the WISH2ACTION program was implemented in 7 regions of Tanzania, targeting youths in the Hard-to-reach. Due to the operating environment where only out-of-school youths were allowed to receive comprehensive sexuality education, UMATI introduced a model known as the special youth weekend clinic (YWC). This model uses peer educators to mobilize young people during the week and motivate them to visit a youth weekend clinic on either Saturday or Sunday.When young people attend the weekend clinic, they get sexual reproductive information and education provided by trained peer educators. SRH information and education are normally provided in an edutainment way which includes plays, music, drama, and sports. Because seeing is believing, peer educators use audio-visual cards with SRH materials from DMI to deliver education and information aimed at tackling the SRH and FP myths and misconceptions among the youth.These are called UMATI special Youth Weekend Clinics because the provision of SRH/FP information and education is integrated with youth-friendly services (YFS). This makes it easier for youths that attend the weekend clinics because after they receive information on SRH, some of them want to get services that are provided by trained service providers on YFS.
Finding the balance between scale and localisation: DMI’s experience of delivering a family planning mass media campaign across seven countries and 29 languages
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Presented by :
Ssanyu Kalibbala, Development Media International Uganda
Co-authors :
Abbie Clare, Development Media International
Jonathan Garrard, Development Media International
Matthew Lavoie, Development Media International
Development Media International (DMI) delivered the mass media component of the WISH2ACTION campaign, using relatable characters and storylines to increase audience receptivity to what can be challenging messages on a sensitive subject. However, using characters and storylines that could resonate with audiences in seven countries and 29 languages, whilst maintaining fidelity to the core family planning themes, was a significant challenge.  This presentation describes how DMI, with the help of local consortium partners, struck the balance between working at the scale demanded by WISH yet developed outputs that were attractive to and resonant with local audiences.  The final campaign consisted of 1,214 radio spots, broadcast 560,000 times, dubbed into 29 languages, on 134 radio stations and heard by 70 million listeners, in addition to 344 audio-visual episodes broadcast 8,000 times and seen by 74 million on TV and watched for over 1 minute by 2.5 million on Facebook. A subset of the audiovisual outputs targeting youth, called Temzu Town, was also distributed to youth groups via 15,000 memory devices that could be used to view the episodes on phones. Finally, 3,550 audio and 830 video talking cards were distributed to people living with disabilities and those living in severe poverty across Uganda and Zambia.All radio outputs were written by African script-writers, trans-created by project teams in each country, and pre-tested directly with target audiences in over 250 rural focus groups. All media outputs were further presented to and approved by Ministries of Health in all countries.
04:45PM - 06:15PM
Karam 5
Power in the Context of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Self-Care: Women’s Perspectives, Shifting Understandings, and Implications for Social and Behavior Change Practice
Format : Preformed Panel Presentation
Track : Gender | Inclusion | Research | Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)
Speakers
Holly Burke, FHI 360
Doreen Nakimuli, Population Services International (PSI)
Sarah Okumu, Kenya Medical Research Institute
Reana Thomas, FHI360
Lindsey Reynolds
Erica Sedlander, University Of California, San Francisco
Lauren Suchman, UCSF
Claire Cole, Population Services International (PSI)
The linkages between contraceptive use and women's empowerment have found increased focus with the emergence of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) self-care. In the context of contraception, it is assumed that self-care technologies like self-injectables hold the possibility of providing new inherent social and behavioral change (SBC) for women, as its use may offer women capacity to actualize their power within (or sense of self-worth) by self-administering their own care. In doing so, women may sidestep entrenched social and patriarchal norms that might otherwise supersede their right to realize their SRH goals autonomously. An implied assumption in such a value proposition is that women desire autonomy, and value products that can support them to act independently to achieve their SRH goals.  Evidence from early self-injectable program research, however, demonstrates women's varied definitions of and aspirations for "power" in this context. As the global SBC community works to advance individuals' ability to shape the health and lives they desire, such insights have important implications for practice. SBC practitioners require evidence to support intervention design and adaptive management that is in line with women's goals for power in their self-care and lives. Following the logic that 'what gets measured gets managed', this panel will join participants with researchers and implementers from programs across four sub-Saharan countries to consider the role that measurement and evaluation currently plays in shaping SBC practitioners' understanding of whether and how interventions